Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Political Economy or search for Political Economy in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 5: year after College.—September, 1830, to September, 1831.—Age, 19-20. (search)
ther, and giving up your time, perhaps, that it may be added to his days. It is now two days before Commencement. I am stiff in the determination to commence the coming year in the study of law at Cambridge. . . . I intend to give myself to the law, so as to read satisfactorily the regular and parallel courses, to take hold of some of the classics,—Greek, if I can possibly gird up my mind to the work,—to pursue historical studies,—to read Say and Stewart; J. B. Say's Treatise on Political Economy, and Dugald Stewart's Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind. all mingled with those condiments to be found in Shakspeare and the British poets. All empty company and association I shall eschew, and seek in the solitariness of my own mind the best (because the least seducing from my studies) companion. Can I hold fast to these good determinations? I fear much the rebellious spirit of the mortal. However, I will try. I must endeavor to redress by future application my past rem<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
ained many verbal abbreviations. They expressed in an unstudied way his thought at the instant; and he gave to them none of the careful reflection and emendation which he bestowed on whatever he printed. The beginning of the acquaintance of Dr. Francis Lieber Dr. Lieber was born in Berlin, in 1800. Having been a student, soldier, and exile, he came to this country in 1827, and lived successively in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia. In 1835, he became professor of History and Political Economy in the South Carolina College, at Columbia, where he remained more than twenty years. In 1857, he was appointed to a similar professorship in Columbia College, New York, and held the position till his death, Oct. 2, 1872. He is well known by his Encyclopaedia; but his fame is to rest permanently on his Manual of Political Ethics, and his Civil Liberty and Self-Government. and Sumner at Washington has already been referred to. From 1834 until Dr. Lieber's death in 1872, excepting the p
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 11: Paris.—its schools.—January and February, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
rn at Carrara, July 13, 1787. He was at first a lawyer at Bologna, but went to Geneva, in 1814, where he became a professor of law; published a treatise on the Penal Law; was associated with Sismondi in publishing Annals of Legislation and Political Economy; and was a member of the Diet and Council. Removing to Paris, in 1832, he was appointed Professor of Political Economy in the College of France; and, in 1834, Professor of Constitutional Law. He became the political associate of Guizot andPolitical Economy in the College of France; and, in 1834, Professor of Constitutional Law. He became the political associate of Guizot and the Duc de Broglie, and was made a peer of France and a member of the Council of State. From 1845, when he was sent as ambassador to Rome, until his death, he remained in Italy, taking part in political movements; though at one time in retirement at Carrara. While the Pope's chief minister, he was assassinated, Nov. 15, 1848. who, according to the programme, lectured upon Droit Constitutionnel Francais. The lecture-room was in the shape of an amphitheatre, the professor's chair being in the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 12: Paris.—Society and the courts.—March to May, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
id at the dinner: Notre cuisine est la cuisine du monde. Among the guests was Michel Chevalier, M. Chevalier was born Jan. 13, 1806. After the Revolution of 1830, he became editor of the Globe. In 1833-35, under an appointment from Thiers, then Minister, he visited tile United States for the purpose of investigating our railroad system, and later published his Letters on North America, which had already appeared in the Journal des Debats. In 1840, he succeeded Rossi in the chair of Political Economy at the College of France. He is among the most eminent economists of his age, and the head of the free-trade school in his country. Sumner received many attentions from M. Chevalier, on his visit to Paris in 1857; and a friendly correspondence from that time was continued between them. one of the editors of the Journal des Debats, and author of a recent work on the United States. He is a man of about thirty-five, modest, not handsome, but intelligent, with a prominent but expressive
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
e well, then, to catch the Cynthia of the minute? One day, I have sat in the Common Pleas at Westminster; then the Queen's Bench and Exchequer; then I have visited the same courts at their sittings at Guildhall; I have intruded into the quiet debate at Lincoln's Inn before the Chancellor; have passed to the Privy Council (the old Cockpit); have sat with my friend, Mr. Senior, Nassau William Senior, 1790-1864. He was appointed Master in Chancery, in 1836. His writings, on topics of Political Economy, are various; and he was for several years professor of that science at Oxford. Among his publications was one upon American Slavery, which reviewed Sumner's speech, of May 19 and 20, 1856, on The Crime against Kansas, and the personal assault which followed it, being a reprint with additions of his article in the Edinburgh Review, April, 1855, Vol. CI. pp. 293-331. In 1857 they met, both in Paris and afterwards in London, and enjoyed greatly each other's society. Mr. Senior invited