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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
h Ohio battery, looking toward Iuka. The largest tree with the immense wart was thickly dotted with the scars made by bullets and canister-shot, and those of the whole woods around it showed tokens of the battle. in support. At the same time Colonel Eddy, with the Forty-eighth Indiana, was holding ground under a terrible fire, a little in front of the battery to whose assistance the Fourth Minnesota, Captain Le Gro, and Sixteenth Iowa, Colonel Chambers, were speedily sent. The struggle of these few regiments against more than three times their number, led by General Price in person, was brave and unflinching, until Colonel Eddy was mortally wounded, and the remainder of his regiment was hurled back in disorder, leaving the battery (every horse of which had been killed, and seventy-two of the men, including nearly all of the officers, had been slain or wounded) to be seized by the Confederates. For the possession of these guns desperate charges and counter-charges were made, and the
y saluted with a heavy fire of musketry, grape, canister, and shell, under which the 11th Ohio battery was with difficulty brought into position, with the 5th Iowa, Col. Matthias, and 26th Missouri, Col. Boomer, supporting it; the 48th Indiana, Col. Eddy, posted a little in advance of the battery, on the left of the road, holding their ground under a terrible fire; while the 4th Minnesota, Capt. Le Gro, and 16th Iowa, Col. Chambers, were hurried up to their support. The nature of the ground forbidding any extension of our front, the battle was thus maintained by a single brigade, against at least three times their numbers, until Col. Eddy was killed; when the remnant of his regiment was hurled back in disorder and our advanced battery clutched by the Rebels; but not till its every horse had been disabled and every officer killed or wounded. A charge was instantly made to recover it, and the guns were repeatedly taken and retaken; but they were finally dragged off the field by the R
nt example of Colonels Fouke and Logan, assisted by Major Berryman, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General of my brigade; also by Capt. Schwartz, Acting Chief of Artillery, Capt. Dresser, of the artillery, Lieut. Babcock, of the Second cavalry, and Lieut. Eddy, of the Twenty-ninth Illinois regiment, who had, upon my invitation, kindly joined my staff. Our men pressed vigorously upon the enemy and drove them back, their cavalry leaving that part of the field and not appearing again until attacked byms. The blood they so freely poured out proved their devotion to their country, and serves to hallow a just cause with glorious recollections. Their success was that of citizen soldiers. Major Brayman, Captains Schwartz and Dresser, and Lieutenants Eddy and Babcock, all mander. members of my staff, are entitled to my gratitude for the zeal and alacrity with which they bore my orders in the face of danger and discharged all their duties in the field. Colonels Buford, Fouke, and Logan rep
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
omas and I interchanged full dispatches. He had heard of the arrival of General A. J. Smith's two divisions at Paducah, which would surely reach Nashville much sooner than General Hood could possibly do from Florence, so that he was perfectly satisfied with his share of the army. On the 12th, with a full staff, I started from Kingston for Atlanta; and about noon of that day we reached Cartersville, and sat on the edge of a porch to rest, when the telegraph operator, Mr. Van Valkenburg, or Eddy, got the wire down from the poles to his lap, in which he held a small pocket instrument. Calling Chattanooga, he received this message from General Thomas, dated-- Nashville, November 12, 1864--8.30 A. M. Major-General Sherman: Your dispatch of twelve o'clock last night is received. I have no fears that Beauregard can do us any harm now, and, if he attempts to follow you, I will follow him as far as possible. If he does not follow you, I will then thoroughly organize my troops, an
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Little Eddie, the Drummer-Boy: a Reminiscence of Wilson's Creek. (search)
iscovered a man lying in the grass near him. By his dress I recognized him as belonging to the enemy. It appeared that he had been shot through the bowels, and had fallen near where Eddie lay. Knowing that he could not live, and seeing the condition of the boy, he had crawled to him, taken off his buckskin suspenders, and corded the little fellow's legs below the knee, and then lay down and died. While he was telling me these particulars, I heard the tramp of cavalry coming down the ravine, and in a moment a scout of the enemy was upon us, and I was taken prisoner. I requested the officer to take Eddy up in front of him, and he did so, carrying him with great tenderness and care. When we reached the camp of the enemy the little fellow was dead. It is now about two weeks since I made my escape from McCulloch's grasp. I have reenlisted for the war, and as we are likely to be in camp for some time I may write again of other scenes through which I have passed. Chicago Tribune.
ion on the right of the Fifth Iowa. The next regiment in the column, the Forty-eighth Indiana, under its brave Colonel, Eddy; took position on the left of the road, a little in advance of the battery, and with its left thrown forward, so as to coveems it an especial duty to signalize the Forty-eighth Indiana, which, posted on the left, held its ground until the brave Eddy fell, and a whole brigade of Texans came in through a ravine on the little band, and even then only yielded a hundred yardeight (148) killed, six hundred and twenty-five (625) wounded, and twenty (20) missing. Among our wounded officers are Col. Eddy, Forty-eighth Indiana, Col. Chambers, Sixteenth Iowa, and Col. Boomer, Twenty-sixth Missouri. The loss of the enemy, ahias, Tenth Iowa, Col. Perczel; Seventeenth Iowa, Col. Rankin; Fifty-ninth Ohio, Col. Alexander; Forty-eighth Indiana, Colonel Eddy; Twenty-sixth Illinois, Col. Boomer; Fifty-sixth Illinois, Col. Kirkham; Fourth Minnesota, Col. Sanborn; Eightieth Ohi
e resolute Boomer, immediately took position on the right of the Fifth Iowa. The next regiment in the column, the Forty-eighth Indiana, under its brave Colonel, Eddy; took position on the left of the road, a little in advance of the battery, and with its left thrown forward, so as to cover the open field on their left with thei on their bravery and good conduct. He deems it an especial duty to signalize the Forty-eighth Indiana, which, posted on the left, held its ground until the brave Eddy fell, and a whole brigade of Texans came in through a ravine on the little band, and even then only yielded a hundred yards until relieved. The Sixteenth Iowa, ecrans, foots up at one hundred and forty-eight (148) killed, six hundred and twenty-five (625) wounded, and twenty (20) missing. Among our wounded officers are Col. Eddy, Forty-eighth Indiana, Col. Chambers, Sixteenth Iowa, and Col. Boomer, Twenty-sixth Missouri. The loss of the enemy, according to the most carefully collected a
1871. 127,136AlrichMay 28, 1872. 136,525KirchnerMar. 4, 1873. 146,298WendellJan. 6, 1874. 5. Lamp-Brackets. 138,831WolfMay 13, 1873. 6. Work-Holders. 115,288EddyMay 30, 1871. 146,110TurnerDec. 30, 1873. 7. Aprons and Guards. 130,339TowerAug. 6, 1872. 136,410BrowneMar. 4, 1873. 8. Chairs. No.Name.Date. 140,362GrayJu1873. 141,236RobertsonJuly 29, 1873. 142,615ClarkSept. 9, 1873. 143,387SmithSept. 30, 1873. 145,011ProctorNov. 25, 1873. 146,289StansburyJan. 6, 1874. 146,997EddyFeb. 3, 1874. 147,377EddyFeb. 10, 1874. 147,574RobinsonFeb. 17, 1874. 147,981SargeantFeb. 24, 1874. 150,264StrongApr. 27, 1874. 151,018GaarMay 19, 1874. 151,8EddyFeb. 10, 1874. 147,574RobinsonFeb. 17, 1874. 147,981SargeantFeb. 24, 1874. 150,264StrongApr. 27, 1874. 151,018GaarMay 19, 1874. 151,841CassJune 9, 1874. 152,241MortonJune 23, 1874. 153,728Sloan et al.Aug. 4, 1874. 158,436PlankJan. 5, 1875. 161,624McEwenApr. 6, 1875. class I. — motors. 1. Hydraulic Engines and Water-Wheels. No.Name.Date. 120,975JenningsNov. 14, 1871. 121,441WelchNov. 28, 1871. 128,615GreenleafJuly 2, 1872. 131,616HydeSept. 24, 18
of the operator. The letter, being selected, is pressed inward, and the rotation of the disk brings it to the stopping-place, at which an impulse is given to the vertical corresponding plunger. Each selected letter is brought to the same spot, being arrested by engagement with a depression in the stationary ring. The following patents on type-writers may be consulted :— No.Name.Date. 3,228.ThurberAugust26, 1843. 4,271.ThurberNovember18, 1845. 7,652.FairbankSeptember17, 1850. 7,771.EddyNovember12, 1850. 8,980.JonesJune1, 1852. 10,995.ThomasMay30, 1854. 14,907.CooperMay20, 1856. 14,919.JonesMay20, 1856. 15,164.BeachJune24, 1856. 18,504.FrancisOctober27, 1857. No.Name.Date. 22,423.HargerDecember28, 1858. 38,815.De MeyJune9, 1863. 39,296.LivermoreJuly21, 1863. 57,182.PeelerAugust14, 1866. 59,522.FlammNovember6, 1866. 62,206.JohnstonFebruary19, 1867. 65,807.HallJune18, 1867. 79,265.Sholes et alJune23, 1868. 79,868.Sholes et alJuly14, 1868. 81,000.PrattAugust1
. Oil of creosote seems to be the only effectual preventative; piles saturated with this substance were unattacked after being submerged five years. The committee did not test petroleum, nor does it appear to have tried other hydrocarbons or their derivatives. The following United States patents may be consulted:— No.Name and Year. 4,560.Von Schmidt, 1846. 47,132.Robbins, 1865. 48,636.Hamar, 1865. 49,146.Palmer, 1865. 49,382.Cooley et al., 1865. 52,046.Holmquist, 1866. 53,217.Eddy, 1866. 53,267.Buell, 1866. 54,194.Myers, 1866. 55,216.Ransome, 1866. 57,960.Perry, 1866. 58,203.Benjamin, 1866. 60,794.Samuels, 1867. 4,158.Samuels (reissued), 1870. 62,334.Holmes, 1867. 62,956.Harvey, 1867. 63,300.Prindle, 1867. 64,703Pustkutchen, 1867. 65,545.Constant et al., 1867. 67,104.Clarke et al., 1867. 68,069.Harding, 1867. 69,260.Seeley, 1867. 70,761.Taylor, 1867. 73,246.Harmyer, 1868. 73,585.Beer, 1868. 77,777.Spaulding, 1868. 78,514.Calkins, 1868. 84,733Cowlin
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