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in the New World, which was opened under a charter derived from a legislature, with tolls regulated by law. The enterprising citizens of Medford were among the first movers of the project, and the steadiest helpers of the work. It contributed so much to the wealth of our town, by inducing ship-builders to settle and work among us, that a notice of it belongs to our records. I find the following statistics in an Historical Sketch of the Middlesex Canal, gathered by their faithful agent, Caleb Eddy, Esq., and dated 1843:-- In the month of May, 1793, a number of gentlemen associated for opening a canal from the waters of the Merrimac, by Concord River, or in some other way, through the waters of Mystic River, to the town of Boston. There were present at this meeting the Hon. James Sullivan, Benjamin Hall, Willis Hall, Ebenezer Hall, Jonathan Porter, Loammi Baldwin, Ebenezer Hall, jun., Andrew Hall, and Samuel Swan, Esq. After organizing, by the choice of Benjamin Hall as chai
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Dr. W. T. G. Morton (search)
ery and of his own merits as the discoverer. No one can blame him for this. As events proved, it would have been far better for him if he had finished his course at the medical-school and set up his sign in the vicinity of Beacon Street; but the wisest man can but dimly foresee the future. Doctor Morton had every reason to believe that there was a fortune to be made in etherization. He consulted Rufus Choate, who advised him to obtain a patent or proprietary right in his discovery. Hon. Caleb Eddy undertook to do this for him, and being supported by a sound opinion from Daniel Webster, easily obtained it. Now, however, Morton's troubles began. He exempted the Massachusetts Hospital from the application of his royalty, and it was only right that he should do so; but, unfortunately, it was the only large hospital where etherization was regularly practised. In order to extend its application Doctor Morton secured the services of three young physicians, practised them in the use
December, Mar. 26, 1825 For Josiah Quincy, 1836; for all others, 65, Apr. 11, 1825 For Josiah Quincy, 3168; for Blake, 1750, Dec. 9, 1826 For Josiah Quincy, 2189; for Amos Binney, 340, Dec. 10, 1827 For Harrison Gray Otis, 2778; for Caleb Eddy, 1283, Dec. 8, 1828 For Harrison Gray Otis, 1844; for all others, 152, Dec. 14, 1829 For Harrison G. Otis, 2828; for Theodore Lyman, 672, Dec. 13, 1830 For Charles Wells, 3316; for Theo. Lyman, 2309, Dec. 28, 1831 For Charles Wells,strong, 3025; for John W. James, 1185, Dec. 13, 1835 For Samuel A. Elliott, 3288; for James and Williams, 2377, Dec. 8, 1836 For Samuel A. Elliott, 3471; for Walker, 1126; for Lyman, 1138, Dec. 11, 1837 For Samuel A. Elliott, 3780; for Caleb Eddy, 2769, Dec. 10, 1838 Election City. For Mayor, Jonathan Chapman, 4399; for Bradford Sumner, 3091, Dec. 9, 1839 For Jonathan Chapman, 5224; for Charles G. Greene, 2590, Dec. 14, 1840 For Jonathan Chapman, 4694; for John W. James, 3
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905, Historical Sketch of the old Middlesex canal. (search)
operty, and in case of delayed removal, a wharfage or demurrage charge was added. Meanwhile Caleb Eddy, who assumed the agency of the corporation in 1825, rebuilt the wooden locks and dams of stonethe expenditures of the canal outran its income; but steam came out triumphant. Even sanguine Caleb Eddy became satisfied that larger competition was vain, and set himself to the difficult task of saiated the speed and certainty of the railroad, in spite of the somewhat higher freight rates. Caleb Eddy proposed to abandon the canal for transportation and convert it into a canal for supplying Boser supply. Most of the wells were badly contaminated, some being little short of open sewers. Mr. Eddy's plan consisted in abolishing the levels betwen Billerica and Middlesex Village and Woburn and and eminently suitable for the purpose. The scheme was, however, not successful, and in 1845 Caleb Eddy resigned his position. Stock fell to $150, and in 1846 the canal was abandoned and the proper
s, 55. Danforth, Thomas, 53. Dedham, Mass., 88. Defence, Ship, 73, 74, 79. Derwent, Cumberlandshire, Eng., 49. Despeaux, Helen M., 36. Devonshire Street, Boston, 30. Dickering Wapentake, East Riding, Yorkshire, Eng., 49. Dix, Joel, 9. Dogget, John, 51. Domesday Book, 50. Dorchester, Mass., 48. Downer (family), 43. Drake's History of Middlesex County. 5, 9, 60. Dudley, Deputy Governor Thomas, 27, 28, 33, 52. Dunning's Coal Wharf, 3. Dutton, H. W. & Son, 56. Eddy, Caleb, 8, 9. Edmands, John, 66. Edward II., King, 50. Edwardston, Eng., 25. Edgerly, Adine Fitz (Pratt), 38. Edgerly, Annie E. W. (Mixer), 38. Edgerly, Caroline, 38. Edgerly, Charles Brown, 38. Edgerly, Edward Everett, 36, 38. Edgerly, Helen M. (Despeaux), 38. Edgerly, John S., 36-43, 65. Edgerly, John Woods, 38. Edgerly, Madeline Lemalfa, 38. Edgerly, Samuel, 37. Edgerly Schoolhouse, 43. Edgerly, Thomas, 37, 43. Eldridge,——42. Elliot, —, 32. Elliot, Charles D., 25, <
and making machinery, and a grist-mill. For the first eighteen or twenty years the operatives were summoned to and from work by the blowing of a tin horn at the house of Captain Luke Bemis, where a number of them boarded. This house is still standing on Bemis Street in Watertown, near the Railroad Station. From this custom the euphonious title of Tin Horn has been given to the village near and around the mills. In 1821 Mr. Seth Bemis purchased, of his brother Luke and his partner, Caleb Eddy, the property on the Newton side, and thus became sole owner of the whole water power. Soon after he sold to the Boston Manufacturing Company his original right to put a twelve inch flash-board upon the top of the dam for $1,000 per inch, or $12,000. In 1822 he built the present stone rolling-dam in front of the old wooden one which is still standing. February 3, 1827, the Bemis Manufacturing Company was incorporated, and manufactured satinets and duck until 1830, when the Company diss
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1., Medford Historical Society. (search)
Loomis. Librarian and Curator. Mary E. Sargent. Standing committees. Membership. Benj. P. Hollis, Benj. F. Morrison, Dr. J. E. Cleaves, Dr. R. J. P. Goodwin, Miss Fannie E. Bemis. Publication. R. B. Lawrence, Will C. Eddy, Walter H. Cushing, Dr. R. J. P. Goodwin, Charles H. Loomis. Papers and Addresses. David H. Brown, Charles N. Jones, George E. Davenport, John Ward Dean, Charles H. Morss. Historic Sites. L. L. Dame, Miss E. L. Burbank, will C. Eddy, Walter H. Cushing. Genealogy. Allston P. Joyce, Miss E. A. Black, Miss E. S. Hinckley, Charles E. Larkin, David H. Brown. Heraldry. Benj. P. Hollis, J. Edson young, F. H. C. Woolley, Charles B. Dunham, William F. Kingman. Library and Collections. Miss Mary E. Sargent, Miss Katherine H. Stone, Walter F. Cushing, Miss Agnes W. Lincoln. Historic Photographs and Portraits. Will C. Eddy, John H. Hooper, Dr. R. J. P. Goodwin. Members. [Those mark
office at Cambridge; Historical sketch of the Middlesex canal, by Caleb Eddy, 1843: Amory's life of Governor Sullivan, 1859. by Lorin L. Dame, upon the good old times. Bless your heart, no! was the answer. Mr. Eddy didn't put up with no drunkards on the canal. They could drink alnd twa'n t so heavy, nuther! Meanwhile, under the direction of Caleb Eddy, who assumed the agency of the corporation in 1825, bringing grea outran its income; but steam came out triumphant. Even sanguine Caleb Eddy became satisfied that longer competition was vain, and set himselg arose from a neighboring drain. Here was a golden opportunity. Eddy proposed to abandon the canal as a means of transportation, and convcorporation was drawn up, and a pamphlet was published in 1843 by Caleb Eddy, entitled an Historical Sketch of the Middlesex Canal, with Remare energy with which it was pushed, the agitation came to naught; and Eddy, despairing of the future, resigned his position as agent in 1845.
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 1., Medford Historical Society. (search)
urator. Mary E. Sargent. Standing committees. Membership. Dr. J. E. Cleaves, Dr. R. J. P. Goodwin, Benj. F. Morrison, Geo. O. Foster, Miss Fannie E. Bemis, Miss Annie E. Durgin. Publication. David H. Brown, George E. Davenport, Charles N. Jones, John Ward Dean, Charles H. Loomis. Papers and Addresses. David H. Brown, George E. Davenport, Charles N. Jones, John Ward Dean, Charles H. Morss. Historic Sites. Lorin L. Dame, Walter H. Cushing. will C. Eddy, John H. Hooper, Miss E. L. Burbank, Mrs. J. M. G. Plummer. Genealogy. Allston P. Joyce, Miss E. A. Black, Miss E. S. Hinckley, Wm. I. Parker, Charles E. Larkin, Miss Hettie F. Wait. Heraldry. Benj. P. Hollis, F. H. C. Woolley, Charles B. Dunham, Dr. J. Edson young, William F. Kingman. Library and Collections. Miss Mary E. Sargent, Miss Agnes W. Lincoln. Walter F. Cushing, Miss Katherine H. Stone, Joseph H. Wheeler, Cleopas B. Johnson, Benj. F. Fenton
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 7., An eighteenth century enterprise. (search)
made to utilize the power of steam; but the new manager, Caleb Eddy, seems to have made the most of existing conditions. Hesult was the town, and soon the city, of Lowell. In 1831 Mr. Eddy was directed to survey a route for a branch canal from Biterprise the corporation had. It seems that soon after Mr. Eddy took charge that he scented the coming danger, and in an r places such renewal suspended business for some weeks. Mr. Eddy's executive ability is seen in the fact that he had the mits course. It was with an evident feeling of pride that Mr. Eddy in his next report stated that the work was completed at ed to the Middlesex Canal. In the quaint language of Caleb Eddy, he thought it was better to be a rogue in Canada than aperty, such as canal boats and a dwelling house. While Mr. Eddy took prompt action to secure something from these, it is oss sustained. The railroad, the infant referred to by Mr. Eddy in 1827, though now ('41) but six years old, and weak in
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