Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 6, 10th edition.. You can also browse the collection for Robert Eden or search for Robert Eden in all documents.

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lty, wished them freedom and happiness, till time should be no more. The flowing and confident assurances of Botetourt encouraged the expectation that the unproductive tax on tea would also be given up. Such was his wish; and such the advice of Eden, the new Lieutenant Governor of Maryland. Eden to Hillsborough, 23 Nov. To the Legislature of New-York, Colden, who, on account of the death of Moore, now administered the Government, announced unequivocally the greatest probability that the laEden to Hillsborough, 23 Nov. To the Legislature of New-York, Colden, who, on account of the death of Moore, now administered the Government, announced unequivocally the greatest probability that the late duties imposed by the authority of Parliament, so much to the dissatisfaction of the Colonies, would be taken off in the ensuing session. Journal of the General Assembly, 4; Speech of the Lieutenant Governor, 22 November, 1769. Compare Hillsborough to Colden, 18 January, 1770. Chap. XLII.} 1769. Nov. The confident promise confirmed the loyalty of Dec. the House, though by way of caution they adopted and put upon their journals the resolves of Virginia. Colden to Hillsborough, 4
g. questioned. His language became more explicit as danger drew nearer. In August, Boston saw in its harbor twelve vessels of war, carrying more than two hundred and sixty guns, commanded by Mon. tagu, the brother of Sandwich. Boston Gazette, 19 Aug. 1771. Yet there was no one salient wrong, to attract the sudden and universal attention of the people. The Southern Governors felt no alarm. Eden from Maryland congratulated Hillsborough, on the return of confidence and harmony. Robert Eden to Hillsborough, 4 August, 1771. The people, thus Johnson, the Agent of Connecticut wrote after his return home, appear to be weary of their altercations with the Mother Country; a little discreet conduct on both sides, would perfectly reestablish that warm affection and respect towards Great Britain, for which this country was once so Chap. XLVII.} 1771. Sept. Remarkable. W. S. Johnson to Alexander Wedderburn, 25 Oct. 1771. Hutchinson, too, reported a disposition in all the Colo