Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for John Edwards or search for John Edwards in all documents.

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nded. The loss of the enemy is unknown, but must have been greater. On the same day General Sherman seized the crossing of Turkey Creek, a few miles to the right, and General McPherson, after a sharp skirmish, seized Raymond, still further to the right. The flight of the enemy from Raymond left the way open to Jackson, the capital of Mississippi, and General Grant determined to march his army in that direction. This involved a change in the direction of his movements. Up to this time Edwards's Station, to which I had been leading the advance, was the objective point. Here it was known the enemy had concentrated a considerable force, and intended to accept battle when offered. Jackson now became the objective point. On the night of the twelfth, I was ordered by Major-General Grant to move on the following morning on the north side of Fourteen-Mile Creek to Raymond. At this time my corps rested within four miles of Edwards's Station, with an outpost only three and a picket
ions of the First Virginia and First Vermont cavalry. A squadron of the First Virginia, numbering fifty-six men, under Captain W. C. Carman, lost twenty-six men; one officer, Lieutenant Swintzel, was killed, and several others were wounded. To the right of the First Virginia was the First Vermont, deployed as skirmishers, and still further on the right was General Custer's brigade, the First, Fifth, Sixth, and Seventh Michigan regiments. Two companies — D, Lieutenant Cummings, and A, Lieutenant Edwards of the First Vermont, were deployed as skirmishers in the town. They advanced through a wheat-field, drove the enemy from a fence on their front, when they were recalled to form in the rearguard. They lost fourteen men. Companies L, E, and F, under Captain Schofield and Lieutenant Newton, were deployed to the right of the town, company I, Lieutenant Caldwell, acting as a reserve force. L and E made one charge in skirmish line, and carried a house from behind which the enemy had anno
neral Pemberton informed me, by letter, dated Vicksburgh, May seventeenth, that he had retired within the line of intrenchments around Vicksburgh, having been attacked and forced back from Big Black Bridge, and that he had ordered Haynes's Bluff to be abandoned. His letter concluded with the following remark: I greatly regret that I felt compelled to make the advance beyond Big Black, which has proved so disastrous in its results. It will be remembered that General Pemberton expected that Edwards's Depot would be the battle-field before I reached Jackson, (see his despatch of the twelfth, already quoted,) and that his army, before he received any orders from me, was seven or eight miles east of the Big Black, near Edwards's Depot. On May nineteenth, General Pemberton's reply (dated Vicksburgh, May eighteenth) to my communication of the seventeenth, was brought me, near Vernon, where I had gone with the troops under my command, for the purpose of effecting a junction with him in c
of the Sixth and Eighth cavalry, Missouri State militia, I ordered Major Eno, in command, to fall back on Lebanon, and proceeded to Buffalo, where I found Colonel John Edwards, Eighteenth Iowa volunteers, in command, with a few cavalry and some enrolled militia. I at once addressed myself to the work of concentrating force enoug advance party, entering Huntsville with a dash, took quite a number of soldiers of Brooks's rebel command, with their horses and arms. I was there joined by Colonel Edwards, Eighteenth Iowa infantry, with three hundred men of his regiment, and Major Hunt, First Arkansas cavalry volunteers, one hundred and seventy-five men and twoe also large. My officers and men bore the fatigue and exposure of this campaign without tents and on small rations, in a manner to excite my admiration. Colonels Edwards and Catherwood were earnest in their cooperation in duty. Majors King, Eno, and Hunt, were always ready for any duty assigned them. Major King deserves spe