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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Temperance reform. (search)
, in 1805, and this was followed by temperance societies organized, one at Moreau, Saratoga co., N. Y., April 30, 1808; another at Greenfleld, N. Y., in 1809; and another at Hector, N. Y., April 3, 1818. The Massachusetts Society for the Suppression of Intemperance was instituted at Boston, Feb. 5, 1813; but temperance reform as an organized movement began Feb. 13, 1826, when the American Society for the Promotion of Temperance was organized at the Park Street Church, Boston, Mass. Drs. Justin Edwards, Woods, Jenks, and Wayland, and Messrs. John Tappan and S. V. S. Wilder were prominent in it. The following is the chronology of the chief events in the temperance movement in America: First women's temperance society organized in Ohio, close of......1828 New York State and Connecticut State temperance societies organized......1829 Congressional Temperance Society organized at Washington, D. C.......Feb. 26, 1833 First national temperance convention meets at Philadelphia;
uncan, James, Rev., 1.144.—But see particularly the Postscript which immediately follows the Preface to Volume I. Durfee, Gilbert H., 2.103. Dwight, Timothy, Rev. [1752-1817], 1.21. Earle, Thomas [b. Leicester, Mass., Apr. 21, 1796; d. Philadelphia, July 14, 1849], biographer of Lundy, 2.323; nominated for V. President, 342, 343, 435, democratic views, 343; of committee to recover Emancipator, 351. Eastburn, John H., 1.73. Eayrs, Joseph H., 2.263. Eclectic Review, 1.301. Edwards, Justin, Rev. [1787-1853], 1.214. Eliot, Samuel Atkins [1798-1862], Harvard graduate, 1.213; sympathizes with Boston mob, 2.34; quells Broad St. riot, 32, and Marlboroa Chapel riot, 220.—Portrait in Memorial Hist. Boston, vol. 3. Emancipator, edited by Elihu Embree, 1.88. Emancipator (N. Y.), official organ Am. A. S. S., 1.375, 2.93, 123, 259, competes with Lib., 123, 207, proposal to merge with Lib., 1.415; enlarged issue, 483; burnt at Charleston, 485; edited by Leavitt, 2.170; articles
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 7: Baltimore jail, and After.—1830. (search)
of the slaveholders; trusting that all true and good men would discharge the obligation pressing upon them to espouse the cause of the poor, the oppressed, the down-trodden. He read to me letters he had addressed to Dr. Channing, Dr. Beecher, Dr. Edwards, W. E. Channing, Lyman Beecher, Justin Edwards. the Hon. Jeremiah Mason, and Hon. Daniel Webster, holding up to their view the tremendous iniquity of the land, and begging them, ere it should be too late, to interpose their great power in tJustin Edwards. the Hon. Jeremiah Mason, and Hon. Daniel Webster, holding up to their view the tremendous iniquity of the land, and begging them, ere it should be too late, to interpose their great power in the Church and State to save our country from the terrible calamities which the sin of slavery was bringing upon us. These letters were eloquent, solemn, impressive. I wonder they did not produce a greater effect. It was because none to whom he appealed, in public or private, would espouse the cause, that Mr. Garrison found himself left and impelled to become the leader of the great anti-slavery reform . . . . The hearing of Mr. Garrison's lectures was a great epoch in my own life. The imp
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 8: the Anti-Sabbath Convention.—1848. (search)
ady displayed in this narrative; and Ante, 2.51, 107-114, 152-154; 3.3, 9, 65. as far back as the summer of 1844, remarking the roving commission of the Rev. Justin Edwards, D. D., of Andover, for a year past, to enforce Sabbatarianism, he proposed a Lib. 14.110. New England Convention to discuss the Sabbath. Occurrences meanwhe necks of the American people. In a recent appeal made for pecuniary assistance by the Executive Committee of that Union, it is stated that the Secretary (Rev. Dr. Edwards) has visited twenty of the United States, and travelled more than thirty thousand miles, addressing public bodies of all descriptions, and presenting reasonseep the Sabbath,—all secular business, travelling, and amusement be confined to six days in a week, —and all people assemble on the Sabbath, and worship God. Justin Edwards. A permanent (?) Sabbath document has been prepared by the Secretary; and what has already been done will put a copy of this document into more than three hun
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30., A New ship, a New colony, and a New church. (search)
here became a well-known citizen, living in the second house west from the First Parish or Unitarian church. See Register. Vol. II, p. 67; Vol. XVIII, p. 89. Park Street, Rev. Ebenezer Rogers and Dea. Samuel Fales, First Church, Dedham, Rev. Justin Edwards and Dea. Mark Brown, South Church, Andover, Rev. Benjamin B. Wisner and Dea. William Phillips, Old South Church, Rev. Samuel Green and Bro. John Tappan, Union Church, who after hearing and approving the articles of faith and covenant whichpia shall soon stretch out her hands unto God. It having been reported to the Council that the infant church had made unanimous choice of Newport Gardner and John Selmar Nubia as deacons, the fellowship of the church was expressed to them by Rev. Mr. Edwards and the closing prayer by Rev. Mr. Green. An anthem arranged by Deacon Gardner was then sung. The Christian Watchman of December 30 (Baptist weekly) gives the same account, with this addition,— A Congregational Church and all the exer