hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 37 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 23 5 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 13 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 12 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 135 results in 35 document sections:

1 2 3 4
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter28: Gettysburg-Third day. (search)
commanded the corps July 1, and General Newton, who was assigned to that command on the 1st, superseded him July 2. Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton: -First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alexander Shaler; 65th N. Y., Col. Joseph E. Hamblin; 67th N. Y., Col. Nelson Cross; 122d N. Y., Col. Silas Titus; 23d Pa., Lieut.-Col. John F. Glenn ; 82d Pa., Col. Isaac C. Bassett. Second Brigade, Col. Henry L. Eustis; 7th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Franklin P. Harlow; Tenth Mass., Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Parsons; 37th Mass., Col. Oliver Edwards; 2d R. I., Col. Horatio Rogers, Jr. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton, Col. David J. Nevin ; 62d N. Y., Col. David J. Nevin, Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Hamilton; 93d Pa., Maj. John I. Nevin; 98th Pa., Maj. John B. Kohler; 102d Pa., Guarding wagon-train at Westminster, and not engaged in the battle. Col. John W. Patterson; 139th Pa., Col. Frederick H. Collier, Lieut.-Col. William H. Moody. Artillery Brigade, Col. Charles H. Tompkins; Mass. Light, 1st Batt. (A), Capt. William H. M
munication the infantry was quiet, with the exception of Getty's division, which made a reconnoissance to the Opequon, and developed a heavy force of the enemy at Edwards's Corners. The cavalry, however, was employed a good deal in this interval skirmishing-heavily at times — to maintain a space about six miles in width between thMichigan Cavalry, Company G, Lieutenant William H. Wheeler. first division: (1) Brigadier-General David A. Russell. (2) Brigadier-General Emory Upton. (3) Colonel Oliver Edwards. first brigade: Lieutenant-Colonel Edward L. Campbell. Fourth New Jersey, Captain Baldwin Hufty. Tenth New Jersey, Major Lambert Boeman. Fifteenth New JerD. P. Douw. Ninety-fifth and Ninety-Sixth Pennsylvania, Guarding trains, and not engaged in the battle. Captain Francis J Randall. Third brigade: (1) Colonel Oliver Edwards. (2) Colonel Isaac C. Bassett. Thirty-seventh Massachusetts, Lieutenant-Colonel George L. Montague. Forty-ninth Pennsylvania, Lieutenant-Colonel Bay
k in the afternoon, though the distance is but twenty-eight miles. As soon as we arrived at Colonel Edwards's headquarters in the town, where I intended stopping for the night, I sent a courier to ttifying there. By the time we had completed our survey it was dark, and just as we reached Colonel Edwards's house on our return a courier came in from Cedar Creek bringing word that everything was Captain John Harper. Third brigade:[At Winchester, Va., and not engaged in the battle.] Colonel Oliver Edwards. Thirty-seventh Massachusetts, Lieutenant-Colonel George L. Montague. Forty-ninth Pennsoceeding up the street which leads directly through Winchester, from the Logan residence, where Edwards was quartered, to the Valley pike, I noticed that there were many women at the windows and doossion of panic-stricken men. I was greatly disturbed by the sight, but at once sent word to Colonel Edwards, commanding the brigade in Winchester, to stretch his troops across the valley, near Mill C
The passengers stated that the rebels were at Frederick, Maryland; that rebel scouts were in and about Hagerstown, and that an advance on that place by the rebels was regarded as imminent. There was also a report from Chambersburgh that a rebel spy had been arrested there, with maps and plans of the Cumberland valley in his possession. Men then began earnestly to discuss means of defence for Harrisburgh.--The Thirty-seventh regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, under the command of Colonel Oliver Edwards, left Pittsfield for the seat of war. A party of rebels under the command of Captain Bowles, a son of J. B. Bowles, President of the Bank of Louisville, Ky., made a raid upon Shepherdsville, Ky., and burned the bridge over Salt River. A guard of eighty-five of the Fifty-fourth regiment, stationed at that place, were compelled to surrender, but were soon after paroled.--Louisville Democrat, September 8. Major-General Pope, at his own request, was relieved from the command o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
as prisoners to Indianapolis.--G. W. M. For a distance of eighteen miles north of Big Creek Gap, a pass southwest of Cumberland Gap, the Confederates had heavily blockaded the narrow and abrupt defiles along that route. The work of clearing the blockades was thoroughly done. But while Spears was thus engaged Kirby Smith advanced with a large force of infantry through a bridle-path called Woodson's Gap, to cut him off. The attempt might well have succeeded but for the heroic act of Mrs. Edwards, a noble woman, whose heart was wholly in the Union cause, although she had a son in each of the opposing armies. Well mounted, she passed the mountains by another path, and, by incredible efforts, reached my headquarters in time to enable me to send couriers at full speed with orders for Spears to fall back toward Barboursville, until his scouts should report that Smith had recrossed the mountains. In order to succeed in the task committed to me it was necessary to compel Kirby Smith
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Fredericksburg, Va. (search)
eonard Martin. Artillery loss; w, 1. Third division, Brig.-Gen. John Newton. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John Cochrane: 65th N. Y., Col. Alexander Shaler; 67th N. Y., Col. Nelson Cross; 122d N. Y., Col. Silas Titus; 23d Pa., Maj. John F. Glenn; 61st Pa., Col. George C. Spear; 82d Pa., Col. David H. Williams. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 19; m, 3 == 24. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Charles Devens, Jr.: 7th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Franklin P. Harlow; 10th Mass., Col. Henry L. Eustis; 37th Mass., Colonel Oliver Edwards; 36th N. Y., Col. William H. Browne; 2d R. I., Col. Frank Wheaton, Lieut.-Col. Nelson Viall. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 14 == 17. Third Brigade, Col. Thomas A. Rowley, Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton: 62d N. Y., Maj. Wilson Hubbell; 93d Pa., Maj. John M. Mark; 98th Pa., Lieut.-Col. Adolph Mehler; 102d Pa., Lieut.-Col. Joseph M. Kinkead; 139th Pa., Lieut.-Col. James D. Owens. Brigade loss: w, 6; m, 6 == 12. Artillery: C, 1st Pa., Capt. Jeremiah McCarthy; D, 1st Pa., Capt. Michael Hall; G, 2d U
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in the Chancellorsville campaign. (search)
oss: w, 8; m, 1=9. Third division, Maj.-Gen. John Newton. First Brigade, Col. Alexander Shaler: 65th N. Y., Lieut. Col. Joseph E. Hamblin; 67th N. Y., Col. Nelson Cross; 122d N. Y., Col. Silas Titus; 23d Pa., Col. John Ely; 82d Pa., Maj. Isaac C. Bassett. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 86; m, 67 = 160. Second Brigade, Col. William H. Browne (w), Col. Henry L. Eustis: 7th Mass., Col. Thomas D. Johns (w), Lieut.-Col. Franklin P. Harlow; 10th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Parsons; 37th Mass., Col. Oliver Edwards; 36th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. James J. Walsh; 2d R. I., Col. Horatio Rogers, Jr. Brigade loss: k, 42; w, 278; m, 22 = 342. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton: 62d N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Hamilton; 93d Pa., Capt. John S. Long; 98th Pa., Col. John F. Ballier (w), Lieut.-Col. George Wynkoop; 102d Pa., Col. Joseph M. Kinkead; 139th Pa., Col. Frederick H. Collier. Brigade loss: k, 48; w, 237; m, 200 = 485. Artillery, Capt. Jeremiah McCarthy: C and D, 1st Pa., Capt. Jeremiah McCarth
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
rigade loss: k, 2; w, 11; m, 2= 15. Third division, Maj.-Gen. John Newton, Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alexander Shaler: 65th N. Y., Col. Joseph E. Hamblin; 67th N. Y,, Col. Nelson Cross; 122d N. Y., Col. Silas Titus; 23d Pa., Lieut.-Col. John F. Glenn; 82d Pa., Col. Isaac C. Bassett. Brigade loss: k, 15; w, 56; m, 3 = 74. Second Brigade, Col. Henry L. Eustis: 7th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Franklin P. Harlow; 10th Mass., Lieut.-Col. Joseph B. Parsons; 37th Mass., Col. Oliver Edwards; 2d R. I., Col. Horatio Rogers, Jr. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 41; m, 25=69. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Frank Wheaton, Col. David J. Nevin: 62d N. Y., Col. David J. Nevin, Lieut.-Col. Theodore B. Hamilton; 93d Pa., Maj. John I. Nevin; 98th Pa., Maj. John B. Kohler; 102d Pa., Guarding trains and not engaged in the battle. Col. John W. Patterson; 139th Pa., Col. Frederick H. Collier, Lieut.-Col. William H. Moody. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 51 = 53. artillery Brigade, Col. Charles H. Tompk
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
Pemberton, dated the; 12th, informing me that the enemy was apparently moving in heavy force on Edwards's depot, which, as he said, will be the battle-field if I can carry forward sufficient force, lat Colonel Wirt Adams, of the cavalry, had informed him that General Pemberton's forces were at Edwards's depot, 20 miles from Vicksburg, and his headquarters at Bovina, 8 miles from that place; that at once with his whole available force ; but in the ride of ten or twelve miles to his camp at Edwards's depot he determined to disobey my order, and on his arrival assembled a council of war, whichy it was to ruin us. After the decision of the council of war, General Pemberton remained at Edwards's depot at least 24 hours; and instead of marching in the morning of the 14th, his movement wasofficers and 28,221 enlisted men. These were the troops that occupied Vicksburg and the camp at Edwards's depot when General Pemberton received my order dated May 13th. There were, besides, above tw
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The defense of Vicksburg. (search)
important points on our main line of communications at the railroad bridge and Edwards's depot, I returned to Vicksburg with Captain Wintter's company of sappers ando march up the east bank of Big Black River, to strike the railroad at or near Edwards's depot, and thus cut his communications with Jackson. To prevent this, and ae same time to defeat Grant, if possible, he concentrated all of his forces at Edwards's depot, excepting General Forney's division which was left in Vicksburg, and bridge. On the 12th of May, under the orders of General Pemberton, I went to Edwards's depot to put the Confederate forces in position upon the ground selected forhe two unfortunate engagements which did actually occur. The army remained at Edwards's depot from the 13th to the 15th. During this time General Pemberton receive and the disgraceful stampede of Big Black bridge. Pemberton moved out from Edwards's depot in obedience to a dispatch from General Johnston, ordering him to atta
1 2 3 4