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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. W. Eldridge or search for J. W. Eldridge in all documents.

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icable to any general officer in the military service, who should not, on the last day of any month, have been engaged in the performance of duty or service corresponding to his proper rank for three months consecutively, then next preceding. Mr. Eldridge, of Wisconsin, demanded the yeas and nays, and they were ordered, and the bill passed — yeas, ninety-nine; nays, thirty-eight. In the Senate, the bill was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs. On the twenty-second, Mr. Wilson repof Guerrilla Marauders, and for other purposes. In the House, on the sixth of June, 1864, Mr. Garfield, of Ohio, from the Committee on Military Affairs, introduced a bill for the more speedy punishment of guerrillas, and for other purposes. Mr. Eldridge, of Wisconsin, moved that the bill be laid upon the table. Lost — yeas, thirty-five; nays, sixty-seven. It was then passed — yeas, seventy-two; nays, thirty-seven. In the Senate, on the thirteenth of June, Mr. Wilson, from the Committee o<
ng the prisoners was Lieutenant-Colonel Von Schraden, Assistant Inspector-General on the staff of the Federal General Thomas. Of the artillery actually captured, I am unable to ascertain how many pieces were ultimately secured. After night, Major Eldridge, Chief of Artillery, sent four pieces and one caisson beyond the Chickamauga. The men being exhausted, and night approaching, after distributing ammunition, Brown's brigade was formed in front, facing the Chattanooga road; Clayton on the rin the service, displayed throughout his usual intelligence, promptness, and cool courage. Major John C. Thompson, A. I. General, and Lieutenant S. H. Cahal, A. A. and I. General, were conspicuous for their zeal and disregard of danger. Major J. W. Eldridge, Chief of Artillery, discharged his duties with energy and skill, bringing the artillery into play, on the few occasions where it was practicable, with judgment and success. My two Aids, Lieutenants Bromfield Ridley, Jr., and R. Caruthers