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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
s (June 6, 1862), looking south. After a drawing by rear-admiral Walke. Monarch and Switzerland were dispatched in pursuit of her and a few transports, but returned without overtaking them, although they captured another steamer. See paper on Ellet and his steam-rams at Memphis, page 453.-editors. The scene at this battle was rendered most sublime by the desperate nature of the engagement and the momentous consequences that followed very speedily after the first attack. Thousands of pes gave way, the lamentations which went up from the spectators were like cries of anguish. Boats were put off from our vessels to save as many lives as possible. No serious injury was received by any one on board the United States fleet. Colonel Ellet received a pistol-shot in the leg; a shot struck the Carondelet in the bow, broke up her anchor and anchor-stock, and fragments were scattered over her deck among her officers and crew, wounding slightly Acting-Master Gibson and two or three
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Ellet and his steam-rams at Memphis. (search)
Ellet and his steam-rams at Memphis. Alfred W. Ellet, Brigadier-General, U. S. V. After the death of Colonel Ellet, the command of the ram-fleet was conferred upon the writer, by order of the Secretary of War.-editors. In the distance: Price, little Rebel, Queen of the West, and monarch. Union gun-boats. Van Dorn Jeff. Thompson. Bragg. Sumter. Beauregard (sinking). Lovell (sunk). the battle of Memphis, June 6, 1862 (looking north). retreat of the Confederate fleet. After a sketch by rear-admiral Walke. On the 8th of March, 1862, occurred the memorable catastrophe at Hampton Roads. The possibility of such a disaster had been repeatedly urged in warning terms by a gentleman who had vainly endeavored to avert it. I refer to the late eminent civil engineer, Charles Ellet, Jr., the inventor of the steam-ram. as a vehicle of war destruction. On the 6th of February, 1862, Mr. Ellet wrote in a pamphlet as follows: It is not generally known that the rebe
enemy had collected a force of twelve thousand men at Richmond, in Louisiana, nine miles from Milliken's Bend, I sent General Ellet to General Mowry, at Young's Point, to act in conjunction to wake them up. General Mowry promptly acceded to the request, and, with about one thousand two hundred men in company with the Marine brigade, General A. W. Ellet commanding, proceeded to Richmond, where they completely routed the advance-guard of the rebels, consisting of four thousand men and six piecesas handsomely performed by the different parties connected in it. David D. Porter, Assistant Rear-Admiral. Brigadier-General Ellet's report. Headquarters M. B. Brigade, flag-ship Autocrat, above Vicksburgh, June 17, 1863. Admiral: I had I feel indebted to the General for his prompt cooperation and advice, and his skilful manner of handling his forces. A. W. Ellet, Brigadier-General Commanding M. B. Brigade. A National account. Chickasaw Bayou, Thursday, June 18, via Cai
menced, and six or seven men were killed and wounded. While the army have had a troublesome enemy in front, behind them, the gunboats, Marine brigade, under General Ellet, and a small force of troops, under Generals Dennis and Mower, have kept at bay a large force of rebels, over twelve thousand strong, accompanied by a large qusion of Memphis. Meanwhile, Farragut had returned, and was witness to the labors of the engineers. The first force to approach it from above was the fleet of Colonel Ellet, on the fourteenth of June, and on the twentieth he was followed by Commodore Davis. General Butler had, in the mean while, despatched General Williams with a ed at Chickasaw Bayou for the steamers to be in readiness to leave for Vicksburgh, and before three o'clock a long line of steamers filed down to the wharf. General Ellet, with the Marine brigade, was the first to land, Admiral Porter next, then the lower fleet, and finally the long line of transports, commissary boats, tugs, ba
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Naval operations in the Vicksburg campaign. (search)
or gun-boats. Later in the month a more important expedition was sent down the river. It was composed of the Benton, Mound City, and Bragg, together with four of Ellet's rams, the Switzerland, Monarch, Samson, and Lioness, all under Lieutenant-Commander Phelps, with a detachment of troops under Colonel Charles R. Woods. At Millixistence, to the Navy Department, which henceforth exercised exclusive direction of it. The second was the order of the Secretary of War of November 8th, directing Ellet to report for orders and duty to Porter. These two changes made the vessels in the Mississippi for the first time a homogeneous naval force, and swept away all thrters. He received from Davis intact the squadron as it had come from Foote — the Benton, the seven Eads iron-clads, and the three Rodgers gun-boats. He had also Ellet's nine rams and several very valuable captured vessels, including the Eastport, and Montgomery's rams captured at Memphis — the Bragg, Pillow, Price, and Little Re
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Union vessels in the Vicksburg operations. (search)
), Lieut.-Com. T. O. Selfridge, 4 guns, 1 howitzer; Lexington, Lieut. James W. Shirk (St. Charles, Yazoo River, Dec., ‘62, Arkansas Post); Lieut.-Com. S. L. Phelps (Cumberland River, Jan.,‘63); Lieut.-Com. Le Roy Fitch (Tennessee and Cumberland rivers); Lieut. G. M. Bache (White River), 6 guns; Sept., ‘62, 7 guns, 1 howitzer; Tyler, Lieut. William Gwin (action with Arkansas, July 15, ‘62); Lieut.-Com. J. M. Prichett (Yazoo River, Dec., ‘62, Helena), 7 guns; Sept., ‘62, 9 guns, 1 howitzer. Ellet rams.--Lieut.-Col. A. W. Ellet, Col. C. R. Ellet. (Originally employed without armament; subsequently howitzers or other light guns were mounted from time to time. Frequent changes were also made in commanding officers. Those engaged in important actions are mentioned below. The vessels were the Fulton, Horner, Lancaster, Lieut.-Col. J. A. Ellet (passage of Vicksburg, March 25th, 1863); Lioness, Master T. O'Reilly (Yazoo River, December, 1862); Mingo, Monarch, Sergt. E. W. Davis (Ya
to the United States, be placed in similar circumstances, that every dwelling, outhouse or other structure in the said town of Austin (save three to be left as a protection to the women and children) be burned to the ground. Provost-Marshal will take possession of the town and see to the prompt execution of this order, and that no marauding be permitted nor personal injury be sustained by any citizen of said town. Personal effects he will allow owners to remove. By command of Brigadier-General A. W. Ellet. W. D. Crandall, A. A. G. Though the place was thoroughly searched for arms or other articles contraband of war, while the place was burning, the rapid and frequent discharge of secreted arms in two buildings took place, and at length an explosion of powder in the basement of the jail shook the firm earth and made the distant hills resound. Surely this is a dire punishment, but such is the result of war. This people must be made to feel that to harbor and encourage the enem
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
essels promptly returned the fire and kept up the battle for six hours, inflicting considerable damage on the fort. July 15, 1862. Confed. iron-clad ram Arkansas came down the Yazoo River and engaged the Federal gunboats Carondelet and Tyler, and ram Queen of the West. The ram succeeded in escaping to Vicksburg. July 22, 1862. Confed. steamer Reliance captured by U. S. steamer Huntsville. Unsuccessful attempt made to sink the Confed. ram Arkansas, at Vicksburg, by Lieut-Col. Ellet, with the Union ram Queen of the West and ironclad Essex, Commander W. D. Porter. July 29, 1862. Attack on Fort James, on the Ogeechee River, Ga., by Federal gunboats repulsed. August, 1862. August 6, 1862. Destruction of Confed. ram Arkansas by her commander, Lieut. Stevens, at Baton Rouge, La. August 16, 1862. Lieut.-Comdr. Phelps with 3 gunboats and 4 rams, and the 58th and 76th Ohio in transports, left Helena, Ark., sailed down the Mississippi to Milliken
tanley, 513 Edwards, T. W., 513 Edwards, William, 357 Eggleston, G. C., 4, 146 Egleston, C. T., 357 Ehrlacher, E. T., 64 Eibers, H., 513 Eigenbrodt, C. S., 357 Einhorn, C. W. J., 357 Ela, E. P. C., 357 Ela, W. H., 357 Elder, J. L., 152 Elder, Robert, 357 Elder, W. R., 514 Eldred, L. W., 454 Eldridge, Alpheus, 454 Eldridge, C. F., 514 Eldridge, Ebenezer, 357 Eldridge, H. R., 358 Eldridge, Nathan, 358 Eldridge, W. P., 358 Eliott, Charles, 2d, 514 Elkins, Henrl, 454 Ellet, A. W., 42 Elletts, James, 514 Ellick, E. A., 358 Elliott, B. R., 358 Elliott, Estes, 491 Elliott, Israel, Jr., 514 Elliott, Joseph, 3d Mass. Cav., 64, 358 Elliott, Joseph, 7th Mass. Inf., 454 Ellis, C. H., 514 Ellis, C. T., 454 Ellis, G. H., 358 Ellis, G. W., 358 Ellis, George, 358 Ellis, H. E., 491 Ellis, J. E., 358 Ellis, R. A., 562 Ellis, William, 491 Elms, C. H., 358 Elwell, Andrew, 116, 238 Emerson, A. B., 358 Emerson, C. H., 358 Emerson, F. F., 514 Emerson, G. O.,
IV., 106. Elizabeth River, Va.: V., 258; VI., 157, 158. Elizabethtown, Ky.: II., 328; IV., 148. Elk Mountain, Md.: signal station at, VIII., 320, 321. Elk River, Ala., I., 213, 362. Elk River, Tenn., II., 137, 178, 342. Elk River, bridge over, near Dechard, II., 273. Elkhorn, Ark., L. 365. Elkhorn Tavern Ark. I., 358. Elkins, J. A., VII., 207. Elkins Ferry, Ark., II., 352. Ellerson's Mill, Va., I., 319, 322, 364, 366. Ellet, A. W.: I., 240; VI., 35, 69, 151, 209, 314, 316. Ellet, C., Jr. I., 223, 236, 239 seq., 240 Seq., 241, 242; death of, I., 246; VI., 35, 83, 220. Ellet, C. R., VI., 151, 220, 318. Ellet, J. A., VI., 151. Elliot, S., Jr. I., 100, III., 191; VI., 272; X., 157. Elliott, Thomas Vii., 181. Elliott, W. L.: III., 318: X., 87. Elliott Grays, Virginia Sixth Inf., VIII., 383. Elliott's Salient, Petersburg, Va. , III., 193, 195, 205. Ellis,, C. S. S.,