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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 5 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 4 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for Ellet or search for Ellet in all documents.

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enterprise was mainly designed for intimidation. As flag-officer, Commander Davis succeeded Commodore Foote in command of the newly improvised flotilla on the Mississippi River, this consisting partly of army rams devised and commanded by Colonel Ellet, and placed under the temporary command of the flag-officer. Commodore Foote had relinquished command, because of wounds, on May 9, 1861. The first naval engagement of the war, in the sense of a squadron fight, thus took place under a Massac Later, Fort Pillow was bombarded by Davis up to June 4, when it was abandoned, leaving forty heavy guns and much military material. On June 6 Davis commanded in a second fight with the Confederate flotilla, he being now fully reinforced by Colonel Ellet and his rams. The eight Confederate boats had from two to four guns each, and the five Union boats from thirteen to eighteen guns each. Greene's Mississippi (Campaigns of the Civil War), p. 15. An hour's fight decided the fate of Memphis,