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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 56 14 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 46 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 25 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 18 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 17 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Charles Ellet or search for Charles Ellet in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 17: evacuation of Fort Pillow and battle of Memphis. (search)
of Memphis. Bombardment and evacuation of Fort Pillow. Col. Ellet's ram flotilla. capture of a Confederate transport. the vessels the shape of a ram flotilla,commanded by a very gallant man, Col. Charles Ellet, of the U. S. Army. These vessels were simply ordinary riverany enterprise. The Flag-officer assigned a proper position to Col. Ellet, and the combined fleet proceeded down the river to Fort Pillow, airly commenced, two of the army rams, the Queen of the West, Col. Charles Ellet, and the Monarch, Lieut.-Col. Ellet (a younger brother), dashLieut.-Col. Ellet (a younger brother), dashed fearlessly ahead of the gunboats and ran for the enemy's fleet. At the first encounter they sank one and disabled another of the Confeder fleet. He could only request co-operation, which the Commander, Col. Ellet, was eager to give. The latter fought well, but unfortunately hingly built and heavily armed, each of them being superior to any in Ellet's fleet. No doubt the enemy calculated a great deal on them. They
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
eutenant-Commander Selfridge's request he was sent on this duty in the Cairo, with the Pittsburg, Lieut.-Commanding Hoel, and the ram Queen of the West, Colonel Charles Ellet, Jr., commanding. These officers were cautioned to be particularly careful and run no risks. On the 12th of December the vessels proceeded on the duty asd along the road made by Sherman's soldiers, but unfortunately for the enemy they mistook the Lexington, Marmora, Queen of the West and Monarch--the two latter Colonel Ellet's rams — for transports. Before the Confederates could fire a second round, these vessels opened on them with shrapnel, grape and canister, cutting them up anter Geo. W. Brown, Rattler. Lieutenant-Commander Watson Smith, Marmora, Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant Robert Getty, Monarch, (ram) Queen of the West, (ram) Colonel Chas. Ellet, Jr. The second attack on Vicksburg terminated quite as unsatisfactorily as the first, and every one came to the conclusion that Vicksburg could only be co
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
emy seemed prepared for action again, and this time General Sherman having sent a messenger to inform the admiral that he was in position and was gradually encircling the Confederate Army, the gun-boats were ordered to take position again not further than 50 yards from the fort and begin to fire as soon as they pleased. The battle commenced and soon became very hot; when the tin-clads Glide, Lieutenant-Commander Woodworth, and Rattler, Lieutenant-Commander Smith, and the rain Monarch, Colonel Ellet, were ordered by the admiral to force their way through the obstructions above the forts, reach the ferry and cut off the enemy's retreat. In a short time all the guns in the works were silenced and the flag-ship Black Hawk was run to the bank alongside the fort to board it with her crew; at the same Appearance of Ix-inch gun silenced by the Cincinnati. time a messenger was sent to General Sherman informing him of the condition of affairs, and that if he would send a storming party