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ddresses of the several gentlemen were received with universal demonstrations of appreciation. In the evening a festival took place at the Planter's Hotel, the patriotic hostess of which is Madame De Bare. A grand Union ball was given, which was numerously attended. A series of skirmishes took place between a force of Union troops, under the command of Col. Sill, and a considerable body of rebel infantry and artillery, at the mouth of Battle Creek, Tennessee.--(Doc. 138.) Colonel Charles Ellett, commander of the ram squadron of the United States, on the Mississippi River, died at Cairo, Ill., while on his way to New Albany, Ind.--The Seventh, Twenty-second, Thirty-seventh, and Forty-seventh regiments New York State militia were mustered into the service of the United States Government for three months. A fight took place near Fair Oaks, Va., between the pickets of the Union army, supported by a redoubt, and a large attacking force of rebels, in which the rebels were re
Doc. 54.-evacuation of Fort Pillow. Colonel Ellett's report. opposite Randolph, below Fort Pillow, June 5. Hon. E. M. Stanton: To my mortification the e They carried away or destroyed every thing valuable. Early this morning Lieut.-Col. Ellett and a few men in a yawl went ashore, followed immediately by Col. Fitch ae rams twelve miles below the fort to a point opposite Randolph, and sent Lieut.-Col. Ellett ashore with a flag of truce to demand the surrender of the place. Their or two before we approached. The people seemed to respect the flag which Lieut.-Col. Ellett planted. The guns had been dismantled and some piles of cotton were burning I shall leave Lieut.-Col. Ellett here in the advance, and return immediately to Fort Pillow to bring on my entire force. The people attribute the suddenness oof the old order of things, though still professing to be secessionists. Charles Ellett, Jr., Colonel Commanding Ram Flotilla. A National account. Fort Pill
ssippi River, pro tem. Despatches from Colonel Ellett. opposite Memphis, June 6, 1862. To Hmy, which first boldly stood their ground. Col. Ellett, in the Monarch, of which Capt. Dryden is Fmpliance with the request of Col. Davis, Lieut.-Col. Ellett despatched the Monarch and the Switzerlaf Capt. Dryden, or the heroic conduct of Lieut.-Col. Ellett. I will name all parties in special reply person in my fleet who was disabled. Charles Ellett, Jr., Colonel Commanding Ram-Fleet. opposittection of the Constitution. (Signed) Chas. Ellett, Jr., Colonel Commanding. The bearer of ts office, Memphis, Tenn., June 6, 1862. Charles Ellett, Jr., Commanding, etc.: sir: Your note ofeached me. Respectfully, (Signed) Charles Ellett, Jr., Colonel Commanding. opposite Memphis,o my fleet. Respectfully, (Signed) Chas. Ellett, Jr., Colonel Commanding Ram-Fleet. Capta River or elsewhere. All must confess that Col. Ellett, Com. Davis, and all of their officers and [3 more...]
R. Rilett, ashore, with a flag of truce and the following note to the authorities. Opposite Memphis, June 4, 1862. To the Civil or Military Authorities of Memphis. Gentlemen: I understand that the city of Memphis has surrendered. I therefore send my son with two United States flags with instructions to raise one upon the Custom-House and the other upon the Court-House, on an evidence of the return of your city in the care and protection of the Constitution. (Signed,) Charles Ellett, Jr. The bearing of the flag and the above note was accompanied by Lieutenant Cranhell, of the Fifty-ninth regiment, and two men of the boatguard. The following is the reply of the Mayor of this city:-- Mayor's Office, Memphis, Tenn., June 8th, 1862. Colonel Chas. Ellet, Jr., Commanding, &c.-- Sir: Your note of this date is received, and the contents noted. The civil authorities of this city are not advised of its surrender to the forces of the United States
Death of Charles Ellett, Jr. The Philadelphia Inquirer states that Charles Ellett, Jr., died at Cairo, Saturday, the 21st inst., from the effects of a wound received in the late engagement at Memphis. The last publication, perhaps which he ever made was his report of that engagement as "Colonel commanding water rams." He was understood to have been but slightly wounded in that combat of boats; but that injury reported as slight terminated his career. He was a native of Pennsylvania,Charles Ellett, Jr., died at Cairo, Saturday, the 21st inst., from the effects of a wound received in the late engagement at Memphis. The last publication, perhaps which he ever made was his report of that engagement as "Colonel commanding water rams." He was understood to have been but slightly wounded in that combat of boats; but that injury reported as slight terminated his career. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and born in Penn Manor, in 1810. His parents were Charles and Mary Ellett, the latter of whom is still living in Philadelphia at the advanced age of eighty- two years. Mr. Ellett had passed a large part of his life in this State, following his pursuit of civil engineer.--He was consulting engineer with Judge Wright, on the James River and Kanawha Canal at its commencement, and was employed at different times on other public works in Virginia. He was a man of fine talents, and a very bol