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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Percy Elliott or search for Percy Elliott in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
mith, S. Syntis B. Green. Company B, Lieutenant Geo. D. Smith, Commanding: Killed—Sergeants Chase B. Postell, Sim Moreton; Privates E. L. Barie, Jas. C. Bryan. Wounded—Lieutenants Geo. D. Smith, Wm, D. Grant; Sergeant E. C. Wade; Privates Percy Elliott, F. Kreeger, J. Darracott, J. Douglass, J. N. Guerard, T. Kreeger, J. H. Polk, J. H. Butler. Company C, Captain Gilbert C. Rice Commanding: Killed—Captain G. C. Rice; Lieutenant George M. Turner; Sergeant George E. James; Privates B. Blois, John R. Dillon; Sergeants F. Ripon Sweat, Bayard J. McIntosh, Chas. R. Maxwell, M. McLean, C. J. Sweat, Albert Folker. Died Since of their Wounds—Company A: Lieutenant Fred A. Tupper; Private B. Green. Company B: Lieutenants George D. Smith, Wm. D. Grant; Sergeant E. C. Wade; Privates Percy Elliott, F. Kreeger, F. N. Guerard. Company C: Lieutenant Eugene T. Blois. The balance of the command were either captured unhurt after the fight, or escaped and were present at the sur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The charge of the Crater. (search)
with nerves of steel for the Herculean task of blood. We filed up a ditch, which had been dug for a safe ingress and egress to and from the earthworks, until we reached the vale between the elevation on which the breastworks were located and the one on the banks of the little stream just mentioned-within two hundred yards of the enemy. The ill-fated battery, which had been demolished by the explosion, projected from the line of earthworks for the infantry at an acute angle, and was called Elliott's Salient. It overlooked the enemy's line of works, which were on the northeastern slope of the same elevation, about 100 yards distant. The Crater, or excavation caused by the explosion, was about twenty-five feet deep, sixty feet wide and 150 feet long, with its crest about twelve feet above the ground. About seventy-five feet in rear of the line of earthworks there was a wide ditch with the bank thrown up on the side next to the fortifications. This was constructed to protect parti
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Signal service Corps. [Sunday news, Charleston, S. C., May 2, 1897.] (search)
me comparatively free from danger, while others were exposed and dangerous, that a term of service thereat, by any soldier, can be looked on as a certificate of bravery. You have passed a highly merited eulogy on our lamented Comrade Thomas Huguenin, whose highest honor is that he commanded at Fort Sumter, but let me call to your attention the fact that three members of the Signal Corps were constantly there on duty, sharing not only the dangers and trials of Huguenin, but also of Rhett, Elliott, Harleston, Mitchell and of all those other heroes who there did serve, and of whose records we, as brother soldiers, are so proud. Fort Sumter still holds out. By their side the signal officer stood, and beneath crumbling wall and the midst of bursting shells, with flag in hand by day and torch by night, they sent to this seemingly doomed city the glad tidings: Fort Sumpter still holds out. When you honor the memories of those heroes, who for their country, gave up their lives, forg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
s, on nearly the same field. From Rion's forts to Colquitt's salient there was a short gap. The forts were somewhat nearer to the Federal lines than the salient, but when on the 19th the forts were abandoned and new lines established south of Hare's Race Course, in the old canal, then the gap was closed and Colquitt's salient became nearer the Federal lines. Beyond Colquitt's salient to the east the lines ran to the salient, variously called Pegram's (who occupied it on the 18th of June), Elliott's (who there fought the mine fight in August) and Gracie's (who held it after the mine fight). None of these, however, were engaged on the 18th of June. The attack of the Federals commenced on the 16th. From the Virginia battery, on the banks of the Appomattox, to the Colquitt salient, the Confederate lines were there held by General Wise's Virginia brigade and the Virginia reserves. The Federals came across the James river and advanced on Petersburg by the Charles City roads. They sw