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L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience 5 1 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 27, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience, Final Chapter: the faithful but less conspicuous laborers. (search)
died before the close of the war. Other efficient nurses appointed by the Western Sanitary Commission (and there were none more efficient anywhere) were, Miss Carrie C. McNair, Miss N. A. Shepard, Miss C. A. Harwood, Miss Rebecca M. Craighead, Miss Ida Johnson, Mrs. Dorothea Ogden, Miss Harriet N. Phillips, Mrs. A. Reese, Mrs. Maria Brooks, Mrs. Mary Otis, Miss Harriet Peabody, Mrs. M. A. Wells, Mrs. Florence P. Sterling, Miss N. L. Ostram, Mrs. Anne Ward, Miss Isabella M. Hartshorn, Mrs. Mary Ellis, Mrs. L. E. Lathrop, Miss Louisa Otis, Mrs. Lydia Leach, Mrs. Mary Andrews, Mrs. Mary Ludlow, Mrs. Hannah A. Haines and Mrs. Mary Allen. Most of these were from St. Louis or its vicinity. The following, also for the most part from St. Louis, were appointed somewhat later by the Western Sanitary Commission, but rendered excellent service. Mrs. M. I. Ballard, Mrs. E. O. Gibson, Mrs. L. D. Aldrich, Mrs. Houghton, Mrs. Sarah A. Barton, Mrs. Olive Freeman, Mrs. Anne M. Shattuck, Mrs. E.
L. P. Brockett, Women's work in the civil war: a record of heroism, patriotism and patience, Index of names of women whose services are recorded in this book. (search)
Divers, Bridget, 80-82. Dix, Miss Dorothea L., 45, 97-108, 134,274,290. Don Carlos, Mrs. Minnie, 89. Dougherty, Miss Deborah, 408. Dykeman, Mrs. M. J., 408. Edgar, Mrs. T. D., 409. Edwards, Miss, 89. Elliott, Miss Melcenia, 48, 380-384. Ellis, Mrs. Mary, 408. Ellis, Miss Ruth L., 405. Ely, Mrs. Dr., 409. Engelmann, Mrs. Mary, 409. Etheridge, Mrs. Annie, 218, 301. Fales, Mrs. Almira, 47, 279-283. Fales, Miss, 409. Farr, Mrs. Lizzie H., 411. Felton, Miss Mary, 411. Ferris, Mrs.Ellis, Miss Ruth L., 405. Ely, Mrs. Dr., 409. Engelmann, Mrs. Mary, 409. Etheridge, Mrs. Annie, 218, 301. Fales, Mrs. Almira, 47, 279-283. Fales, Miss, 409. Farr, Mrs. Lizzie H., 411. Felton, Miss Mary, 411. Ferris, Mrs., 408. Field, Mrs. David Dudley, 62. Filley, Mrs. Chauncey I., 408. Fisk, Mrs. Clinton B., 408. Flanders, Mrs. Benj., 89. Flanders, Miss Fanny, 89. Flanders, Miss Florence, 89. Ford, Miss Charlotte, 406. Francis, Miss Abby, 209. Freeman, Mrs. Olive, 408. Fremont, Mrs. Jessie B., 274, 408. Frietchie, Barbara, 70-72, 76. Gardiner, Miss M., 301. Gibbons, Mrs. A. H., 406. Gibson, Mrs. E. O., 396, 399, 408. Gibson, Mrs. Peter, 410. Gillis, Miss Agnes, 405. Gilson, Miss Helen L., 45,
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 6. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Old portraits and modern Sketches (search)
s well as the most worthy of all my earthly comforts; and the reason of that love was more thy inward than thy outward excellences, which yet were many. God knows, and thou knowest it, I can say it was a match of Providence's making; and God's image in us both was the first thing and the most amiable and engaging ornament in our eyes. About this time our friend Thomas, seeing that his old playmate at Chalfont was destined for another, turned his attention towards a young Friend, named Mary Ellis. He had been for several years acquainted with her, but now he found his heart secretly drawn and inclining towards her. At length, he tells us, as I was sitting all alone, waiting upon the Lord for counsel and guidance in this, in itself and to me, important affair, I felt a word sweetly arise in me, as if I had heard a Voice which said, Go, and prevail! and faith springing in my heart at the word, I immediately rose and went, nothing doubting. On arriving at her residence, he states t
o await an indictment by the Hustings Court Grand Jury in May. The examination of Elizabeth Cullen, on the charge of receiving a quantity of beef stolen from Mary Broderick, was partially heard and continued until the 26 himself. Gamwell, slave of Joseph Pearce, was tried for stealing two please of bacon and one piece of soap from Major Amblor, and ordered to be finished for his dishonesty. Bel. Summers alias Anne Williams, Minus Travis Anna Adams, and Cors Livingston alias Mary Ellis, were brought up and required to answer the charge of being women of evil name and reputation, and occupying a private box on the floor of the dress circle in the Marshall Theatre, in a place set apart for respectable people.--The females are of the flash order, and well known about the city. It appears that on Friday night some person having a knowledge of their personal appearance identified them in one of the private boards. and informed the city police. The latter repacked to the pr