Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for George E. Ellis or search for George E. Ellis in all documents.

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sachusetts Historical Society, founded in 1791, has long done good service in preserving the details of national and local history, Its first centenary was commemorated Jan. 24, 1891, with an oration by T. W. Higginson, and addresses by Rev. George E. Ellis and Robert C. Winthrop; and the public exercises were followed by a reception at Mr. Winthrop's house. and its succession of presidents, distinguished by the names of Savage, Winthrop, and Ellis, are an assurance of genuine merit in investEllis, are an assurance of genuine merit in investigation. Theodore Parker, Wendell Phillips, and Henry Wilson, the last an historian as well as Senator and Vice-President, were not admitted to the Society. Richard Hildreth's History of the United States did not bring him membership while he remained in Boston, but after his removal to New York he was made a corresponding member. Sumner was not chosen a member till a few weeks before his death. James Freeman Clarke's membership came late in his life, though his knowledge of history was a
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 38: repeal of the Missouri Compromise.—reply to Butler and Mason.—the Republican Party.—address on Granville Sharp.—friendly correspondence.—1853-1854. (search)
C. Waterston, wrote letters warm with admiration and gratitude. Whittier in an ode commemorated the speech, in which he found— Brougham's scathing power with Canning's grace combined, and recalling the rock by which they had sat by the seaside four years before, saw in it ‘the type of one Who, momently by Error's host assailed, Stands strong as truth, in greaves of granite mailed, And, tranquil-fronted, listening over all The tumult, hears the angels say, Well done! ’ Rev. George E. Ellis, since president of the Massachusetts Historical Society, wrote, September 14:— I cannot forbear the expression of the respect and admiration with which I have watched your course in public life, in reading all that comes from your lips and pen, and in imagining you as often amid the surroundings of a coarse and unprincipled crew, maintaining principles that require the highest moral courage for their championship. It is my firm belief, from many chance remarks that I hear, th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
o town; by appointment visited Lambeth, where I was shown over the palace by Rev. Mr. Thomas, the son-in-law of the Archbishop; attended House of Commons, where I heard Lord John Russell on the Jews again; dined with Mr. Adolphus, Adolphus and Ellis, the reporters, were each old friends of Sumner. Ante, vol. 1. p. 343; vol. II. pp. 64, 65, 373. and met there Mr. Macaulay, also Mr. Ellis; after dinner also Mr. Paull, Henry Paull. now member for St. Ives, who remembered meeting me at BerMr. Ellis; after dinner also Mr. Paull, Henry Paull. now member for St. Ives, who remembered meeting me at Berlin. August 4. Lunched at Argyll Lodge; called on Lady Morgan; Sumner made her acquaintance in 1838. Ante, vol. II. pp. 21, 46. went to House of Commons; dined at Senior's en famille. August 5. Mr. Parkes breakfasted with me; at ten o'clock left London; took the train to Godalming, where I got upon the outside of the stage-coach for twenty-four miles on my way to Mr. Cobden's at Midhurst, passing the great estates of Petworth, now in the hands of Colonel Wyndham. Mr. Cobden was waiti