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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 19, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. W. Ellis or search for J. W. Ellis in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

rom Col. Burnside rode up and asked for the field officers. Col. Martin then ordered us forward. Prior to this some of the Seventy-first had gone over to the First Rhode Island, and were fighting in their ranks. Boroughs, commissary of the Seventy-first, rode up in front of us, dismounted from his horse, and told the boys to go in and fight on their own account, which they did with a will. Just prior to this Capt. Hart, of Company A, had been wounded and carried from the field; also Capt. Ellis, of Company F. Then Lieut. Oakley came on. Going forward to the brow of the hill he received a shot in the leg of his pantaloons from one of his own men. Some time after this the firing ceased upon both sides. McDowell, with his staff, then rode through our lines, receiving a cheer from the Seventy-first, and passed down the hill to the left, within 600 feet of the enemy's line. After that the brigade fell back into the woods and rested, taking care of the wounded, and removing them
Col. Duryea. Shortly after all the forces were directed to retire, the design of the reconnoissance having been accomplished. I am not, of course, speaking of the movements of other corps excepting as immediately connected with my regiment, and it were especially gratuitous, inasmuch as their General was upon the field and directed the movements of the various commands in person. Frederick Townsend, Colonel Third Regiment Rebel official report. Yorktown, Va., June 11, 1861. Hon. J. W. Ellis, Governor of North Carolina: sir:--I have the honor to report that eight hundred of my regiment and three hundred and sixty Virginians were engaged for five and a half hours with four and a half regiments of the enemy, at Bethel Church, nine miles from Hampton. The enemy made three distinct and well-sustained charges, but were repulsed with heavy loss. Our cavalry pursued them for six miles, when their retreat became a total rout. Fearing that heavy reinforcements would be sent
e Pinckney, at Charleston, seized. December 30. The United States arsenal at Charleston seized. January 2. Fort Macon and the United States arsenal at Fayetteville seized by North Carolina. January 3. Forts Pulaski and Jackson, and the United States arsenal at Savannah, seized by Georgia troops. January 4. Fort Morgan and the United States arsenal at Mobile seized by Alabama. January 8. Forts Johnson and Caswell, at Smithville, seized by North Carolina; restored by order of Gov. Ellis. January 9. The Star of the West, bearing reinforcements to Major Anderson, fired at in Charleston harbor. January 10. The steamer Marion seized by South Carolina; restored on the 11th. January 11. The United States arsenal at Baton Rouge, and Forts Pike, St. Philip, and Jackson, seized by Louisiana. January 12. Fort Barrancas and the navy-yard at Pensacola seized by Florida. January 12. Fort McRae, at Pensacola, seized by Florida. These forts cost $5,947,000, are pier