hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 19 results in 5 document sections:

ited almost entirely from the New York Fire Department. The smaller picture is a nearer view of their quarters, over which they have placed the sign Hotel de Zouave. We see them still wearing the uniform of the battlefield: wide dark-blue trousers with socks covering the bottoms, red flannel shirts with the silver badge of the New York Fire Department, blue jackets elaborately trimmed with braid, red fez caps with blue tassels, and a blue sash around the waist. Their regiment, the famous Ellsworth's Zouaves, was posted at Bull Run as a support for Rickett's and Griffin's Batteries during the fierce fighting of the afternoon on the Henry House hill. They gave way before the charge of the Confederates, leaving 48 dead and 75 wounded on the field. About 65 of them were taken prisoners, some of whom we see here a month after the battle. The following October the prisoners were exchanged. At the beginning of the war the possession of prisoners did not mean as much to the South as it
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
killed. May 20, 1861: North Carolina seceded. May 24, 1861: Col. E. Elmer Ellsworth, 11th N. Y. Vols., killed by a civilian while removing a Southern flagachment of Cavalry. Confed., 13th Va., Rosser's Battery, Colonel Ephraim Elmer Ellsworth One of the First to Fall. The shooting of this young patriot profoundly shocked and stirred the Federals at the opening of the war. Colonel Ellsworth had organized a Zouave regiment in Chicago, and in April, 1861, he organized another from the Fire Department in New York City. Colonel Ellsworth, on May 24, 1861, led his Fire Zouaves to Alexandria, Virginia, seized the city, and with his own m the proprietor of the hotel, James T. Jackson, as he emptied a shotgun into Ellsworth's breast. Jackson was immediately shot dead by Private Brownell. The last letter Colonel Ephraim Elmer Ellsworth Marshall House, Alexandria, Virginia, 1861 detachments of Cavalry. Losses: Union 6 killed, 8 wounded. Septemb
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ellsworth, Ephraim Elmer, 1837- (search)
Ellsworth, Ephraim Elmer, 1837- Military officer; born in Mechanicsville, N. Y., April 23, 1837; was first engaged in mercantile business in Troy, N. Y., and as a patent solicitor in Chicago he acquired a good income. While studying law he joined a Zouave corps at Chicago, and in July, 1860, visited some of the Eastern cities61, he organized another from the New York Fire Department. These were among the earlier troops that hastened to Washington. Leading his Zouaves to Alexandria, Ellsworth was shot dead by the proprietor of the Marshall House, while he was descending the stairs with a Confederate flag which he Ephraim Elmer Ellsworth. had pulled Ephraim Elmer Ellsworth. had pulled down, May 24, 1861. His body was taken to Washington, and lay in state in the East Room of the White House. It was then taken to New York, where it lay in state in the City Hall, and, after being carried in procession through the streets of the city, it was conveyed to his birthplace for burial. He was young and handsome, and hi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
ay 10, 1861 Baltimore, Md., occupied by United States troops......May 13, 1861 Gen. Geo. B. McClellan, U. S. A., assumes command of the Department of the Ohio, embracing a portion of West Virginia......May 13, 1861 Engagement at Sewell's Point, Va.......May 18-19, 1861 Ordinance of secession of North Carolina adopted in convention, vote unanimous......May 21, 1861 United States troops advance into Virginia and occupy Arlington Heights and Alexandria......May 24, 1861 Col. E. E. Ellsworth, of the New York Fire Zouaves, shot at Alexandria, Va.......May 24, 1861 Gen. Irwin McDowell, U. S. A., assumes command of the Department of Northeastern Virginia......May 28, 1861 Grafton, W. Va., occupied by United States troops......May 30, 1861 Ordinance of secession of the State of Tennessee adopted by the legislature......June 8, 1861 Virginia State troops transferred to the Confederate government......June 8, 1861 Engagement at Big Bethel, Va.......June 10, 186
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
o popular vote in May)......April 25, 1861 Richmond becomes the capital of the Confederacy and general rendezvous of Southern troops......May, 1861 Virginia incorporated with the Confederacy, and Gen. Robert E. Lee in command of the Virginia Confederate forces......May 6, 1861 Gen. Benjamin F. Butler takes command at Fortress Monroe......May 22, 1861 People confirm the secession ordinance......May 23, 1861 First advance of the Federals into Virginia......May 24, 1861 Col. E. E. Ellsworth enters Alexandria in command of the New York Fire Zouaves, and is shot by Jackson, a hotelkeeper at Alexandria, while taking down a Confederate flag......May 24, 1861 Slaves around Fortress Monroe entering the Federal lines are declared contrabrand by Gen. B. F. Butler......May 27, 1861 Occupation of Newport News by the Federals......May 27-29, 1861 Federal troops cross the Ohio at Wheeling and at Parkersburg.......May 27, 1861 Occupy Grafton, W. Va......May 30, 1861 Af