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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
n, where the Orange railroad crosses that river. With him were General Stuart and his cavalry. Elzey's brigade went into camp about a mile east of the railroad, and Trimble and Taylor were posted uproaching in force. General Ewell at once took position, and Colonel Johnson was ordered by General Elzey to hold the ford just below the railroad bridge. He placed the regiment in a skirt of wood ugh discovered them, and after a determined skirmish drove them away. It was the first time General Elzey had seen the men skirmish, and the cool manner in which Goldsborough's men deployed under a housand infantry, two regiments of cavalry and two batteries, feeling our strength. After General Elzey had developed the enemy's force, he drew back from the river to induce him to cross, but he was the common expression and cheers and shouts came from every passing battalion and brigade. Elzey rode by, and turning to the hearty cheers of the men, took off his hat, saying, Boys, I knew you
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
at morning, proud of their diminished ranks, which told the story of their deeds, and the trophy on their colors which showed them their General's approval. General Elzey had on that morning been in rear and selected a good position. When General Ewell came up he was so pleased that he made no attempt to change it. He placed Trimble in the centre, Elzey on the right, Steuart on the left, the First Maryland only being thrown forward, until later when some Virginia regiments were posted to cover our left flank, and towards the middle of the day Taylor came up and acted as reserve. The Baltimore battery and another posted on a hill in the centre of the lind actually was not 4,500 men, while Fremont claimed to have had over 30,000. He displayed less Generalship and his men and officers less spirit than have been ever exhibited by them. We claimed this a Maryland fight, all the Brigadiers commanding, Elzey, Trimble and Steuart being Marylanders, and Ewell being more than half one.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3.22 (search)
absent on detached duty since February, re-joined the regiment. From Frederick's Hall we marched to Blount's Bridge over the South Anna, where we reported to General Elzey, and were assigned to his brigade again, by request of the Colonel and all concerned. On Wednesday June 25th we moved to Ashland, where we slept in line of aited for a movement to be made by some one else. In the corner of a field near the crossroads of Cold Harbor, were collected Generals Jackson, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Elzey, Lawton, Whiting, and others, who sat silently in their saddles, waiting events, or every now and then exchanging a word or two in a low tone with a General officer, or one of their staff. Ranged along the side of the road fronting Gaines's Mill was Elzey's brigade; the rest beyond his right. Each man, from the General commanding the corps to the soldier in the ranks, seemed thoroughly impressed with the belief that everything depended on the impending battle; all were grave and quiet, con
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.37 (search)
ranks, and their losses, were forced to retire. The discipline and coolness of our men saved us from all this. In this battle General Ewell lost his horse, General Elzey was wounded, and the chivalrous Wheat, with many other of our old friends killed. General Elzey being wounded, devolved the command of his brigade upon ColoneGeneral Elzey being wounded, devolved the command of his brigade upon Colonel Walker, of the Thirteenth Virginia, and General Ewell separated us from it, making the Maryland line again a distinct command, under Colonel Johnson. Before the battle he had ordered Captain Brown to report to Brigadier-General Fitz. Lee, in order to give them a chance for service, so for seven days the command only consisted of unjust and extraordinary order. It was not the act of any friend of the regiment nor of any soldier who had ever served in it, as far as could be ascertained. Elzey and Steuart our first and second Colonels had been wounded in battle and were out of the field. They were never consulted about it. Colonel Johnson had been the s
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. (search)
(eighth brigade), Trimble's (seventh brigade), Elzey's (fourth brigade). These officers ranked — ElElzey, Trimble, Taylor. The numbers of the brigades were those they had in the army of the Potomac weighth Virginia regiments were assigned to General Elzey's brigade at Winchester. Colonel KirklandAt Cross Keys, on Sunday, June 8th, 1862, only Elzey's, Trimble's, and Stuart's brigades were engag not to aid in the result of the day. Here General Elzey and General Steuart were both wounded — ElElzey slightly. He came on duty again in a week. Steuart is still disabled — he was struck by a gra not dangerously. At Port Republic, next day, Elzey's brigade, under Colonel Walker, and Trimble'siments of General Ed. Johnson were assigned to Elzey's brigade, and the Maryland line now composed Penn, Seventh Louisiana slightly wounded. General Elzey was at first thought to be mortally woundet Williamsburg, was assigned to the command of Elzey's brigade which he still retains. At Malvern <