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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
rovide any redress for the abuse of the authority conferred by the bill. For thus having convinced the understanding and touched the conscience of a nation, he was publicly thanked by some seven hundred addressers of Boston and Lib. 20.55, 57, 62. vicinity—great lawyers, like Rufus Choate and Benjamin R. Curtis; men of letters, like George Ticknor, William H. Prescott, and Jared Sparks (the last also the President of Harvard College); theologians like Moses Stuart, Leonard Woods, and Ralph Emerson of Andover Seminary. Half as many gentlemen of Newburyport confessed Lib. 20.73. their gratitude to Webster for his having recalled them to a due sense of their Constitutional obligations; and in this group we read the names of Francis Todd (who, if a novice in slave-catching, had known something of Ante, 1.180. slave-trading) and of the Rev. Daniel Dana, D. D. These Ante, 1.207. addresses, with Professor Stuart's obsequious pamphlet Lib. 20.83. on Conscience and the Constitution, e
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 10: the voyage and Arrival.—December, 1837, to January, 1838— age, 26-27. (search)
een people in the United States of this grade, except at a Methodist meeting, so absorbed in devotion. Ascending the hill at Havre, which I did in company with Mr. Emerson, Ralph Emerson, an American merchant, then resident in Havre, now living in San Francisco. I had a beautiful prospect over the city beneath, and passed in viRalph Emerson, an American merchant, then resident in Havre, now living in San Francisco. I had a beautiful prospect over the city beneath, and passed in view of many of the country houses of gentlemen belonging to the city. I could distinctly observe the wall and moat which surrounded the city; though the city has now actually outgrown the military strait-jacket by which it was invested. Some of the best portions are without the walls. After a considerable walk took breakfast, stwelve o'clock,—a late one, even for France; and it was a delicious meal, with light wine and coffee clear as amber. After walking round the city, I dined with Mr. Emerson at his house, whose acquaintance I have made through the introduction of my friend Cleveland. Our hour was between six and seven o'clock; stayed till ten o'cl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
cordial, affectionate reception I received there, and the invitation to make that a home if I ever returned to England. I wrote by the Britannia only half-a-dozen letters. How it made me start to see the smoke puffing from her funnel, which was only to cease when she touched the English pier! To Hillard again, Aug. 11:— I have just returned from an excursion in the country with Felton, to see his wife. Saturday, in a gig, we went to Lancaster. En routeto Cambridge, dined with Ralph Emerson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, living at Concord. whom we found very agreeable and sensible. He did not lead out his winged griffins, to take us into the empyrean; so we went along as with mortal beasts. Perhaps he thought we should not be very docile. He had just received a very characteristic letter from Carlyle, over whom the fancy to come to America had again driven. He will not come. Emerson has two delightful children,—a girl and boy. The girl he calls his honeycomb. Come back stau