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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 32 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 7 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 1 1 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 5: finding a friend. (search)
friend. The personal influence of Ralph Waldo Emerson was so marked, during Miss Fuller's early career, that a separate chapter may well be devoted to delineating it. The first trace of him that I have found among her voluminous papers is this from one of her lively and girlish letters to Mrs. Barlow, dated October 6, 1834. She describes an interview with the Rev. Dr. Dewey, who was, with herself, a guest at Mrs. Farrar's in Cambridge, and adds:-- He spoke with admiration of the Rev. W. Emerson, that only clergyman of all possible clergymen who eludes my acquaintance. But n'importe! I keep his image bright in my mind. Fuller Mss. i. 17. Again, she writes to another correspondent about the same time-- I cannot care much for preached elevation of sentiment unless I have seen it borne out by some proof, as in case of Mr. Emerson. It is so easy for a cultivated mind to excite itself with that tone! Fuller Mss. III. 281. More than a month later she writes to the Re
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Index. (search)
40, 142, 144, 146,148-150, 156-160, 162, 164, 165, 172,175, 177,179,180, 191,205, 216, 221, 226, 247, 284-286, 308, 311. Emerson, Mrs. R. W., 67, 69, 128. Emerson, Waldo, 67. Erckmann-Chatrian, 17. Eustis, Dr., 96. Eustis, Mary (Channing), 128. Everett, Edward, 33. F. Farrar, John, 41, 46, 52, 63, 182. Farrar, M88,196, 221-228, 282, 802; removal to Groton, 43; early composition, 46; first publication, 47, first journey, 68; care of family, 4, 58, 301, 30; friendship with Emerson, 62; love of children, 67 82 107, 210-reading, 68; verses, 38, 70, 102, 185 802; criticisms on Emerson, 71, t2, 157, 810; teaching in Boston, 75; in Providence, 7Emerson, 71, t2, 157, 810; teaching in Boston, 75; in Providence, 79; description of party in Boston, 86; self-esteem and humility, 88, 303, 806-808, 312; life at Jamaica Plain, 94; flower-pieces, 96; description of nature, 98; ryebread days, 104; conversations, 109; interest. in mythology, 114; relations with Miss Martineau, 128; women who took part in her conversations, 128; criticisms on co
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
and form a new church-though such an event as Emerson's withdrawal from the ministry in 1832 is sym is as well embodied as anywhere, perhaps, in Emerson's little treatise Nature, a work which, appea nobody can even laugh at without loving. But Emerson probably came nearer than anyone else to doinactive share in the enterprise and that while Emerson, Alcott, Theodore Parker, and Margaret Fullerr resigned the editorship after two years and Emerson assumed it for a like period, after which it ry genius of Thoreau. In addition to his and Emerson's, there were, among others, metrical contribther in thought or action, our Savonarola, as Emerson called him. During the earlier part of his lihe prosaic rationalism of the Unitarians. In Emerson it shines forth as an unfailing sense of the t least its general European kinship. When Emerson in the opening pages of Nature exhorts his covements. These men were no mere dreamers. Emerson resigning his pulpit rather than administer t[6 more...]
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 8 (search)
rty seem to me not only to overlook, but to despise They do not put their valor to drill. Neither on the field nor the platform has courage any inherent capacity — f taking care of itself. The writer then proceeds to make a quotation from Mr. Emerson, the latter part of which I will read:-- Let us withhold every reproachful, and, if we can, every indignant remark. In this cause, we must renounce our temper, and the risings of pride. If there be any man who thinks the ruin of a race op of the savage, unmindful of the quieter muskets of the civilized infantry, whose unostentatious execution blows whoop and tomahawk to the Devil. Before passing to a consideration of these remarks of Ion, let me say a word in relation to Mr. Emerson. I do not consider him as indorsing any of these criticisms on the Abolitionists. His services to the most radical antislavery movement have been generous and marked. He has never shrunk from any odium which lending his name and voice to it
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
ays followed on; they commenced what they called their trial; you met the same classes again; no man said he ought to be hung; no man said he was guilty; no man predicated anything of his moral position; every man voluntarily and inevitably seemed to give vent to his indignation at the farce of a trial, indicative again of that unheeded, potent, unconscious, but wide-spread sympathy on the side of Brown. Do you suppose that these things mean nothing? What the tender and poetic youth, as Emerson says, dreams today, and conjures up with inarticulate speech, is to-morrow the vociferated result of public opinion, and the day after is the charter of nations. The American people have begun to feel. The mute eloquence of the fugitive slave has gone up and down the highways and byways of the country; it will annex itself to the great American heart of the North, even in the most fossil state of its hunkerism, as a latent sympathy with its right side. This blow, like the first gun at Le
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
es, and the oracular press lays down the law. Why should not the lyceum be in the fashion? To begin, then, at home. For the first time within my memory we have got a man for Governor of Massachusetts, a frank, true, whole-souled, honest man. [Cheering.] That gain alone is worth all the labor. But the office is not the most important in the Commonwealth; only now and then it becomes commanding; in a sad Burns week, for instance, when Mr. Washburn was masquerading as Governor, and when, as Emerson said, if we had a man, and not a cockade, in the chair, something might be done ; or, later, when the present Chief Magistrate pushed Judge Loring, on false pretences, from his stool. Such occasions remind us we have a Governor. But in common times, the Chief Justiceship is far more commanding,--is the real Gibraltar of our State contests. John A. Andrew should have been Chief Justice. [Applause.] You remember they made the first William Pitt Earl of Chatham, and he went into eclipse in
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 19 (search)
eing now murdered by law. It is not yet fifteen years since the first Woman's Rights Convention was held. The first call for one in Massachusetts, a dozen years ago, bore a name heard often in manful protest against popular sins,--that of Waldo Emerson. But in that short fifteen years, a dozen States have changed their laws. One New York statute, a year old, securing to married women control of their wages, will do more to save New York City from being grog-shop and brothel than a thousan expediency. Deviate one hair's-breadth,--grant but a dozen slaves,--only the tiniest seed of concession,--you know not how many and tall branches of mischief shall grow therefrom. That handful of cotton-seed has perpetuated a system which, as Emerson says, impoverishes the soil, depopulates the country, demoralizes the master, curses the victim, enrages the bystander, poisons the atmosphere, and hinders civilization. I need not go over the subsequent compromises in detail. They are alway
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, II: an old-fashioned home (search)
I swam across from one point to another in this river was perhaps the proudest moment of my life. I had no feeling of fear, but one of great confidence. All along Mt. Auburn St. on the side bordering the river were apple trees and no houses. At the age of twelve the boy kept a diary of his own, from which it appears that one of his amusements was attending lectures on such subjects as these: The French Revolution, Ancient History, the poet Southey, and miscellaneous lectures by Rev. Waldo Emerson. The habit of omnivorous reading, which clung to him through his long life, can always be taken for granted. At this period he read Philip Van Artevelde, always a favorite, for the third time. A little later he speaks of spending many half-days in bookstores. During all these evidences of unusual maturity, compared with the slower juvenile development of to-day, the record shows a healthy interest in boyish amusements and activities. For instance:— Went to see Signor Bli