Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3. You can also browse the collection for George B. Emerson or search for George B. Emerson in all documents.

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Cod, and from New Hampshire,—men of good stock, enterprising, self-poised, and large-minded. Some had a pedigree in which they took pride; while others, who could not boast that distinction, fell easily into the fashion of the place. They educated their children in academies and colleges; and when rare ability and ambition were combined in their sons, they sent them to foreign universities. They were careful in the training of their daughters, placing them in the classical school of George B. Emerson, an accomplished teacher, whose devotion to his work for more than thirty years is gratefully remembered. Before steam navigation had been well developed, or even before it existed at all, they sought the advantages of foreign travel for themselves and their families. They had Harvard College near by, which has at all times diffused the academic spirit in the city and its suburbs, and raised up scholars and intellectual guides, through whom a humanizing influence has been diffused ov
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 36: first session in Congress.—welcome to Kossuth.—public lands in the West.—the Fugitive Slave Law.—1851-1852. (search)
peech. Dr. I. Ray, yielding to the force of his argument against the power of Congress to legislate for the rendition of fugitive slaves, though holding previously a different opinion, wrote:— The lofty tone which pervades your speech, peculiarly appropriate to the subject, quickened the motion of my blood a little, and—I mention it as a matter of fact, not compliment—frequently reminded me of Burke's American speeches. I doubt not it will make its mark on public sentiment. George B. Emerson thought it an admirable speech,—one of the noblest that have ever been made in Congress. Professor Charles Beck commended its mild and manly tone, superior to speeches conspicuous for violent language, and entitling it to a permanent place in the future discussion of the slavery question in all its aspects. J. E. Worcester, author of the Dictionary, wrote with admiration of its ability and excellent spirit. William C. Bryant said it was the only thing which preserved the character
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
re American and English friends to welcome him,—among the former T. G. Appleton, Mr. and Mrs. George B. Emerson, and Madame Laugel; and among the latter, Nassau W. SMrs. George B. Emerson, and Madame Laugel; and among the latter, Nassau W. Senior. His first friendly office was a search for Crawford the artist, then facing death; and it was to be their last meeting. His time was well occupied in visitinFrancais, to hear L'ami à la Campagne, a pleasant piece. March 30. Drove with Mr. and Mrs. George B. Emerson Mr. Emerson (1797-1881) was the widely known educaMrs. George B. Emerson Mr. Emerson (1797-1881) was the widely known educator, Ante, vol. II. pp. 158-288; vol. III. p. 2. to the museum of porcelain at Sevres, which was interesting. Dined with them, and then with Mr. Emerson went to thMr. Emerson (1797-1881) was the widely known educator, Ante, vol. II. pp. 158-288; vol. III. p. 2. to the museum of porcelain at Sevres, which was interesting. Dined with them, and then with Mr. Emerson went to the French opera, where La Favorita was played. Of course the show was fine; but I have heard the chief parts sung with more effect in Boston by an Italian company. Mr. Emerson went to the French opera, where La Favorita was played. Of course the show was fine; but I have heard the chief parts sung with more effect in Boston by an Italian company. March 31. Rain and unpleasant weather. Dined with Mr. and Mrs. Greene at their lodgings, beyond the Luxembourg. Received to-day an interesting call from the Comt