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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 210 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 190 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 146 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 138 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 96 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 84 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 68 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 64 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 57 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 55 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Ralph Waldo Emerson or search for Ralph Waldo Emerson in all documents.

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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 1: the Boston mob (second stage).—1835. (search)
Surely, An Abolitionist and Another Abolitionist—two against one—ought to atone for the essay of Hancock. I am disgusted with this squeamish regard for Mr. Lyman, and think it very unwise, as well as positively criminal, for any to attempt to exonerate him from blame. Ellis Gray Loring Mr. Loring was born in Boston, in 1803, the only son of a mother widowed shortly after his birth. At the Latin School, where he was distinguished for scholarship, he had a friend and companion in R. W. Emerson. A gentle and delicate boy, he greatly endeared himself to his classmates and his teachers. He was admitted to the bar in 1827, and attained immediate success. His espousal of the anti-slavery cause at once cost him the larger number of his clients; and the sudden coldness of the Ticknors, Prescotts, and other leading Boston families put an end to his hitherto intimate social relations with them. He never regretted what he thus forfeited, and never wavered in his adhesion to the caus
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
man had been burnt Lib. 6.102. at the stake, it was not the act of numerable and ascertainable malefactors, but of congregated thousands, seized by a mysterious, metaphysical and almost electric phrenzy, and therefore not indictable. Well did Emerson write to Carlyle, October 7, 1835: We have had Emerson's Correspondence, 1.84. in different parts of the country mobs and moblike legislation, and even moblike judicature, which have betrayed an almost godless state of society. The churches Emerson's Correspondence, 1.84. in different parts of the country mobs and moblike legislation, and even moblike judicature, which have betrayed an almost godless state of society. The churches were deeply engrossed in putting down anti-slavery sentiment within and without—the Southern religious bodies with a common voice holding up Lib. 6.5, 93, 194. the abolitionists to public reprobation. A reputed vicegerent of the Almighty, Alexander Campbell, founder of the Christian sect, proclaimed the divine right of Lib. 6.69. slavery and the impiety of interference with it. The Northern churches were divided, but the weight of expression was on the side of the slave-driver. The Methodis
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
t universal ferment, which perhaps exhibited its greatest activity and its greatest moderation in Massachusetts. As Mr. Frothingham well says, in his Life of Theodore Parker, all institutions and all ideas P. 125. went into the furnace of reason, and were tried by fire. Church and state were put to the proof, and the wood, hay, stubble—everything combustible—were consumed. The beginning of this period may be sought as far back Goodell's Slavery and Anti-Slavery, p. 387. as 1825, R. W. Emerson refers this era of activity, this schism between the party of the Past and the party of the Future: the Establishment and the Movement, to 1820 and the twenty years following. It seemed a war between intellect and affection: a crack in nature which split every church in Christendom into Papal and Protestant, Calvinism into Old and New schools, Quakerism into Old and New; brought new divisions in politics, as the new conscience touched temperance and slavery. The key to the period appea
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 4: Pennsylvania Hall.—the non-resistance society.—1838. (search)
th ( Life of Chas. Follen, p. 430). Almost in the same words, but after an interval of seven years (March 3, 1844), Emerson, in a discourse criticising the New England Reformers, held up an ideal which was like nothing so much as Mr. Garrison'sout supporting it by a total regeneration. At a date (December 2, 1841) still nearer the one which now engages us, Mr. Emerson, again in a critical mood, offered this unconscious justification of Mr. Garrison's course—this echo of his prospectusPeace Convention, which, as far as I can learn, bids fair to excite a general interest. Mrs. Chapman adds: I send you Emerson's oration [the famous discourse before the Harvard Divinity School, July 15, 1838]. It is rousing the wrath of the Cambr with reference to this epoch-making event that J. Q. Adams wrote in his diary on Aug. 2, 1840: A young man, named Ralph Waldo Emerson, a son of my once loved friend, William Emerson, and a classmate of my lamented son George, after failing in the e
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 8: the Chardon-Street Convention.—1840. (search)
besides the persons already enumerated, Francis Jackson, Henry G. Chapman, Samuel Philbrick, William Adams, Andrew Robeson, James Russell Lowell, George Ripley, C. P. Cranch, and not a few ladies. Among the interested but passive spectators Lib. 10.194. Weiss's Life of Parker, 1.158. were Dr. Channing, who, as Theodore Parker reports, doubted the propriety of the Convention, since it looks like seeking agitation, and [he] fears the opinion of Garrison, Quincy, and Maria W. Chapman; and R. W. Emerson, who has left the best—indeed, an ideal— summary view of the Convention in its three stages. Emerson's Lectures and Biographical Sketches, ed. 1884, p. 351. Quincy presided. The Come-outers protested against any organization of the meeting, which they desired to be free, without chairman or secretary or committee, bishop or pope. They were overruled, and the Sabbath question was taken up, and proved to be the only theme considered. The Rev. J. V. Himes, pastor of the Chapel, Lib. 1
inia, 1.230, 231, 249; confessions, 250. Tyler, John [1790-1862], on A. S. documents at South, 1.486; plan to restrict slavery in D. C., 2.325. Tyng, Stephen Higginson, Rev. [b. 1800], 1.213. Tyson, Elisha [b. near Philadelphia; d. Baltimore, Feb. 16, 1824, aged 75], 1.393.—Portrait in Life, and in Genius of U. E., April, 1830. Unionist, edited by C. C. Burleigh, 1.416. Unitarians, muzzle for the Lib., 1.462, 463, 2.258, doctrinal timidity, 224.—See, also, W. E. Channing, R. W. Emerson, C. Follen, E. S. Gannett, S. May, Jr., S. J. May, J. G. Palfrey, J. Pierpont, R. F. Wallcut, H. Ware, Jr. Universalists, Maine, mum about slavery, 2.78.—See, also, A. Ballou, G. Bradburn, A. St. Clair. Ursuline Convent sacked, 1.448, 466, 2.33, 189.—View in Memorial Hist. Boston, vol. 3. Utica, mob, 2.39, 42, 45, 52; A. S. centre, 259. Van Buren, Martin [1782-1862], Presidential aspirant, 1.500; opposed by Lib., 2.81; pledge against abolition in D. C., 82, 198; reelection