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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 210 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 190 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 146 0 Browse Search
Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters 138 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 96 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Cheerful Yesterdays 84 0 Browse Search
Jula Ward Howe, Reminiscences: 1819-1899 68 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 64 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 57 1 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 55 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Ralph Waldo Emerson or search for Ralph Waldo Emerson in all documents.

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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4: girlhood 1839-1843; aet. 20-23 (search)
She heard Channing preach, heard him say that God loves bad men as well as good; another window opened in her soul. Again, on a journey to Boston, she met Ralph Waldo Emerson. The train being delayed at a wayside station, she saw the Transcendentalist, whom she had pictured as hardly human, carrying on his shoulder the child of she still held in the main, and with which she felt he would not agree. She enlarged upon the personal presence of Satan on this earth, on his power over man. Mr. Emerson replied with gentle courtesy, Surely the angel must be stronger than the Demon! She never forgot these words; another window opened, and a wide one. Julia Wt least a man, every inch of him. ... I have had hardly the least dash of Transcendentalism, and that of the very best description, a lecture and a visit from Emerson, in both of which he said beautiful things, and to-morrow (don't be shocked!) a conversation at Miss Fuller's, which I shall treasure up for your amusement and in
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
night, and scratch myself with my hair mittens. . .. Beside this feast of hospitality, there was the theatre, with Macready and Helen Faucit in the Lady of Lyons, and the opera, with Grisi and Mario, Alboni and Persiani. Julia, who had been forbidden the theatre since her seventh year, enjoyed to the full both music and drama, but the crowning ecstasy of all she found in the ballet, of which Fanny Elssler and Cerito were the stars. The former was beginning to wane; the dancing which to Emerson and Margaret Fuller seemed poetry and religion had lost, perhaps, something of its magic; the latter was still in her early bloom and grace. Years later, our mother suggested to Theodore Parker that the best stage dancing gives the classic, in a fluent form, with the illumination of life and personality. She recalled nothing sensual or even sensuous in the dances she saw that season, only the very ectasy and embodiment of grace. (But the Doctor thought Cerito ought to be sent to the H
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 7: passion flowers 1852-1858; aet. 33-39 (search)
from the axe of the critical headsman. The veriest de'il --as Burns says -wad look into thy face and swear he could na wrang thee. With love to the Doctor and thy lovely little folk, I am Very sincerely thy friend, John G. Whittier. Emerson wrote:-- Concord, Mass., 30 Dec., 1853. Dear Mrs. Howe, I am just leaving home with much ado of happy preparation for an absence of five weeks, but must take a few moments to thank you for the happiness your gift brings me. It was very kind e better the pure pleasure I find in a new book of poetry so warm with life. Perhaps, when I have finished the book, I shall ask the privilege of saying something further. At present I content myself with thanking you. With great regard, R. W. Emerson. Oliver Wendell Holmes, always generous in his welcome to younger writers, sent the following poem, never before printed:-- If I were one, O Minstrel wild, That held “the golden cup” Not unto thee, Art's stolen child, My hand should yiel
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 3: Newport 1879-1882; aet. 60-63 (search)
d start in writing about Margaret Fuller. This night at 8.50 P. M. died Ralph Waldo Emerson, i.e., all of him that could die. I think of him as a father gone — fathirst time without a crutch, using only my cane. J. F. C.'s sermon was about Emerson, and was very interesting and delicately appreciative. I think that he exaggerated Emerson's solid and practical effect in the promotion of modern liberalism. The change was in the air and was to come. It was in many minds quite independently of Mr. Emerson. He was the foremost literary man of his day in America, philosopher, poet, reformer, all in one. But he did not make his age, which was an age oent. I cannot think how I can do without him. July 22. Commemoration of Mr. Emerson at Concord Town Hall. Several portraits of him and very effective floral deof which was interesting and some of which was irrelevant. He insisted upon Mr. Emerson's having been an evolutionist, and unfolded a good deal of his own tableclot
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 4:
241 Beacon Street
: the New Orleans Exposition 1883-1885; aet. 64-66 (search)
Irving's acting, Matthew Arnold's lectures, Cable's readings, and the coming opera. Pere Hyacinthe also has been here, and a very eminent Hindoo, named Mozumdar. I have lost many of these doings by my journeys, but heard Arnold's lecture on Emerson last evening. I have also heard one of Cable's readings. Arnold does not in the least understand Emerson, I think. He has a positive, square-jawed English mind, with no super-sensible aperg2s. His elocution is pitiable, and when, after his leEmerson, I think. He has a positive, square-jawed English mind, with no super-sensible aperg2s. His elocution is pitiable, and when, after his lecture, Wendell Phillips stepped forward and said a few graceful words of farewell to him, it was like the Rose complimenting the Cabbage ... The year 1883 closed with a climax of triumphant fatigue in the Merchants' and Mechanics' Fair, in which she was president of the Woman's Department. This was to lead to a far more serious undertaking in the autumn of 1884, that of the Woman's Department of the New Orleans Exposition. The Journal may bridge the interval between the two. February 3
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: more changes--1886-1888; aet. 67-69 (search)
len she wrote this summer a careful study of Dante and Beatrice, for the Concord School of Philosophy. This was a summer school of ten years (1879-88) in which Emerson, Alcott, and W. T. Harris took part. July 20 found her at Concord, where she and Julia had been wont to go together. She says, I cannot think of the sittings of many tourists present. The Mormons mostly an ill-looking and ill-smelling crowd. Bishop Whitney, a young man, preached a cosmopolite sermon, quoting Milton and Emerson. He spoke of the Christian Church with patronizing indulgence; insisted upon the doctrine of immediate and personal revelation, and censured the Mormons for somepan was Caroline Sturgis, daughter of Captain William Sturgis, and sister of Ellen (Sturgis) Hooper,--member of the inmost Transcendentalist circle, and friend of Emerson, Ellery Channing, and Margaret Fuller. I desire to set my house in order, and be ready for my departure; thankful to live, or willing to cease from my mortal life
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 9: in the house of labor 1896-1897; aet. 77-78 (search)
e ladies of the Council. Speeches: Rev. Mr. De Wars, Anglican minister, spoke of our taking A. A.W. to England. I wondered if this was my handwriting on the wall. October 10. Wheaton Seminary Club, Vendome. Reminiscences of Longfellow and Emerson.... As I was leaving one lady said to me, Mrs. Howe, you have shocked me very much, and I think that when you go to the other world, you will be sorry that you did not stay as you were, i.e., Orthodox instead of Unitarian. Miss Emerson apologizMiss Emerson apologized to me for this rather uncivil greeting. I feel sure that the lady misunderstood something in my lecture. What, I could not tell. November 1. The Communion service was very delightful. I prayed quite earnestly this morning that the dimness of sight, which has lately troubled me, might disappear. My eyes are really better to-day. I seemed at one moment during the service to see myself as a little child in the Heavenly Father's Nursery, having played my naughty pranks (alas!) and left my
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
so much good-will. I only deserve it because I return it. between this and the day itself came a Memorial meeting in honor of the ninety-sixth anniversary of Emerson's birth. Here she spoke mostly of the ladies of his family --Emerson's mother and his wife. Said also, Emerson was as great in what he did not say as in what heEmerson's mother and his wife. Said also, Emerson was as great in what he did not say as in what he said. Second-class talent tells the whole story, reasons everything out; great genius suggests even more than it says. she was already what she used to call Boston's old spoiled child! all through the Birthday flowers, letters, and telegrams poured into the house. From among the tokens of love and reverence May be chosen thEmerson was as great in what he did not say as in what he said. Second-class talent tells the whole story, reasons everything out; great genius suggests even more than it says. she was already what she used to call Boston's old spoiled child! all through the Birthday flowers, letters, and telegrams poured into the house. From among the tokens of love and reverence May be chosen the quatrain sent by Richard Watson Gilder:--how few have rounded out so full a life! Priestess of righteous war and holy peace, poet and sage, friend, sister, mother, wife, long be it ere that noble heart shall cease! the Woman's Journal issued a special Birthday number. It was a lovely and heart-warming anniversary, the pleasu
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
George's, Newport. officiated, Parson Stone being ill. The President made his response quite audibly. The Chanler children looked lovely, and the baby as dear as a baby can look. His godfather gave him a beautiful silver bowl lined with gold. I gave a silver porringer, Maud a rattle with silver bells; lunch followed. President Roosevelt took me in to the table and seated me on his right. This was a very distinguished honor. The conversation was rather literary. The President admires Emerson's poems, and also Longfellow and Sienkiewicz. He paid me the compliment of saying that Kipling alone had understood the meaning of my Battle Hymn, and that he admired him therefor. Wister proposed the baby's health, and I recited a quatrain which came to me early this morning. Here it is:--Roses are the gift of God, Laurels are the gift of fame; Add the beauty of thy life To the glory of thy name. I said, Two lines for the President and two for the baby ; the two first naturally for
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 13: looking toward sunset 1903-1905; aet. 84-86 (search)
July 30. Oak Glen. Rose at 6.15 A. M. and had good luck in dressing quickly. With dear Flossy took 9 A. M. train for Boston. At Middletown station found the teachers from the West [Denver and Iowa], who started the Battle Hymn when they saw me approaching. This seemed to me charming. My man Michael, recognizing the tune, said: Mrs. Howe, this is a send-off for you! . . . She was going to keep a lecture engagement in Concord, Massachusetts; her theme, A century from the birth of Emerson. She was anxious about this paper, and told Mr. Sanborn (the inevitable reporter calling to borrow her manuscript) that she thought the less said about the address the better. I have tried very hard to say the right thing, but doubt whether I have succeeded. Spite of these doubts, the lecture was received with enthusiasm. September 6. I was very dull at waking and dreaded the drive to church and the stay to Communion. The drive partly dissipated my megrims; every bright object seemed
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