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handsome sabre, carelessly slung by his side, and a heavy pair of Mexican spurs, that jingled and rattled on the pavements, were all I could see of this splendid horseman and dashing leader. Thickset, full-faced, close-cut hair, and ruddy complexion, he looked more like Ainsworth's gentleman of the road than a young, daring cavalry chief of thirty summers. He leaned in his saddle and communicated with General Johnston, and as both smiled, I could hear that his party had been chased by old Emory of the Fifth U. S. Dragoons, whose light artillery could now be heard blazing away south of the town. As Johnston stands conversing with General Griffiths of the Mississippi Brigade, we have a full view of that well-known officer. He is uncovered, and his small compact head is finely developed. His hair is grey, and cut close; his deep-set grey eyes are full of meaning; his features calm as those of a Jesuit; his complexion is ruddy; he wears military whiskers, and no moustaches; his u
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 40: in front of Washington. (search)
d although it resulted in a defeat to our arms, yet it detained the enemy and thereby served to enable General Wright to reach Washington with two divisions of the 6th corps, and the advance of the 19th corps before him. Stanton says in his report: Here (at Washington) they (we) were met by troops from the Army of the Potomac, consisting of the 6th corps under General Wright, a part of the 8th corps under General Gilmore and a part of the 19th corps, just arrived from New Orleans under General Emory. Taking Grant's statement of the troops which had arrived from his army, they were sufficient to hold the works against my troops, at least until others could arrive. But in addition to those which had already arrived, there were the detachments from the invalid corps, called, I believe, the Veteran reserves (of which I was informed there were 5,000), the heavy artillery regiments, the hundred days men, and, I suppose, the part of the 8th corps mentioned by Stanton. To all of these
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
3, 106- 111, 114, 116-130, 133, 136, 140- 166, 170-179, 184, 185-187, 194, 195, 200-213, 219-228, 230-238, 240, 243-248, 250-257, 260, 263, 264, 267, 269, 271-276, 279, 280- 480 Early, Jno. C., 186 Early, Captain R. D., 187 Early, Lieutenant S. H., 68, 81, 97, 130, 186 East Berlin, 258, 263, 264 East Tennessee, 466 Echols. General, 331, 385, 388, 396, 399, 460, 462, 465, 466 Edinburg, 368, 436, 450, 461 Elzey, General, 23, 24, 25, 33, 36, 38, 77, 78, 375, 376, 381 Emory, General (U. S. A.), 393 Evacuation, 53, 54, 55, 56, 65, 66, 67, 89, 105, 363, 384, 467 Evans, Colonel, 4, 5, 16, 26, 31, 32, 35, 37, 47, 52, 132, 140, 154, 155, 158, 173, 188, 190, 349, 359, 388, 422, 425, 444, 448 Ewell, General, 3-6, 13, 15, 31, 33, 50, 51, 54, 56, 63, 74-82, 84, 86, 88, 92-94, 97, 101-03, 106, 107, 108, 111, 112, 114-122, 126, 129, 131, 133, 135, 136, 137, 144, 151, 153- 155, 158, 163, 164, 185, 187, 188, 236, 237, 238, 240, 243, 249, 251, 253-56, 261, 264, 266, 269
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Raid on the Virginia Central Railroad-raid on the Weldon Railroad-Early's movement upon Washington-mining the works before Petersburg-explosion of the mine before Petersburg- campaign in the Shenandoah Valley-capture of the Weldon Railroad (search)
ut this time arrived at Fortress Monroe, on their way to join us. I diverted them from that point to Washington, which place they reached, almost simultaneously with Wright, on the 11th. The 19th corps was commanded by Major-General [William H.] Emory. Early made his reconnaissance with a view of attacking on the following morning, the 12th; but the next morning he found our intrenchments, which were very strong, fully manned. He at once commenced to retreat, Wright following. There is nommanders, Meade and Butler, on the lookout, but the attack was not made. I concluded, then, a few days later, to do something in the way of offensive movement myself, having in view something of the same object that Lee had had. Wright's and Emory's corps were in Washington, and with this reduction of my force Lee might very readily have spared some troops from the defences to send West. I had other objects in view, however, besides keeping Lee where he was. The mine was constructed and r
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Sheridan's advance-visit to Sheridan-Sheridan's victory in the Shenandoah-Sheridan's ride to Winchester-close of the campaign for the winter (search)
the men did halt and turn back. Many of those who had run ten miles got back in time to redeem their reputation as gallant soldiers before night. When Sheridan got to the front he found Getty and Custer still holding their ground firmly between the Confederates and our retreating troops. Everything in the rear was now ordered up. Sheridan at once proceeded to intrench his position; and he awaited an assault from the enemy. This was made with vigor, and was directed principally against Emory's corps, which had sustained the principal loss in the first attack. By one o'clock the attack was repulsed. Early was so badly damaged that he seem disinclined to make another attack, but went to work to intrench himself with a view to holding the position he had already gained. He thought, no doubt, that Sheridan would be glad enough to leave him unmolested; but in this he was mistaken. About the middle of the afternoon Sheridan advanced. He sent his cavalry by both flanks, and the
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 5: Round about Richmond. (search)
onfuse his operations, but presently found a part of the enemy's cavalry and a battery under General Emory marching in his rear by a crossroad from the Yorktown road. He formed and charged in columng his line of retreat and forcing him off to the beach road along the James River. The march of Emory's cavalry across to the Hampton road misled Hooker's division to the same march, and that divisiwhich led it over into the Yorktown road. These misleadings delayed the advance on both roads. Emory followed Stuart until the latter in turn came upon strong grounds, where pursuit became isolatedrtillery, crossed College Creek near James River, and came in after the action at the redoubts. Emory abandoned the pursuit as not feasible, and bivouacked on the route. Cavalry rencounters of the wounded, and missing. Gibson reported one officer and four men wounded, and one gun abandoned. Emory reported two killed and four wounded, and Sanders one officer wounded. But most of the Federal
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 6: the battle of Williamsburg. (search)
ame evident that the fight was for the day, D. H. Hill was asked to return with the balance of his division. Meanwhile, Hooker was bracing the fight on his left. Emory reported to him with his cavalry and light battery, but as his fight was in the wood, Emory was asked to reconnoitre on his extreme left. The fight growing in thEmory was asked to reconnoitre on his extreme left. The fight growing in the wood, Grover drew off part of his brigade to reinforce against it. The Seventy-second and Seventeenth New York Regiments of Taylor's brigade were also sent; then the Seventy-third and Seventy-fourth New York Regiments of the same brigade; but the Confederates gained ground gradually. They were, however, getting short of ammuniti and only a few minutes later D. H. Hill's, of the Confederates. On the approach of Kearny's leading brigades, one regiment was detached from Berry's to reinforce Emory's Cavalry detachment on their left. The other regiments were deployed, the Fifth Michigan on the left of the road, the Thirty-seventh New York on its left, along
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 7: Seven Pines, or Fair Oaks. (search)
of tangled woods that fringe its banks, the valley seldom more than a hundred yards wide. Artillery was posted to command all bridges and those ordered for construction. On the 26th, General McClellan ordered General Fitz-John Porter to organize a force to march against a Confederate outpost near Hanover Court-House. Porter took of Morell's division three brigades,--Martindale's, Butterfield's, and McQuade's,--Berdan's Sharp-shooters and three batteries, two regiments of cavalry under General Emory, and Benson's horse battery; Warren's brigade to march up the right bank of the Pamunkey in connection with operations projected for the fighting column. Porter was the most skilful tactician and strongest fighter in the Federal army, thoroughly trained in his profession from boyhood, and of some experience in field work. The Confederate outpost was commanded by Brigadier-General L. O'B. Branch, six regiments of infantry, one battery, under Captain Latham, and a cavalry regiment, un
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
and accuracy of the divisional firing. Acting-Master Spavin's steadiness at the wheel merits commendation. Acting-Master H. N. Parish, who had charge of the Parrott pivot-gun, disabled early in the action of the 7th by the enemy's shot, afterwards assisted with his crew at the broadside battery. The paymaster, Wm. A. A. Kerr, acting as signal-officer, by his coolness and watchfulness was of material assistance; he also kept a careful record of the incidents of the several actions. Messrs. Emory, Swasey, McConnell and Lloyds, engineers of the vessel, with great difficulties to contend against, in the general unfitness of the engine, boilers and condensing apparatus for such rough service, managed to carry us through the action, for which I was thankful. Fortunately, the readiness of our medical officer, Mr. Perucer, was not called upon. Master's Mate Duncan, acting as gunner, provided a bountiful supply of ammunition for the battery. I have the honor to be, sir, your obed
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
and accuracy of the divisional firing. Acting-Master Spavin's steadiness at the wheel merits commendation. Acting-Master H. N. Parish, who had charge of the Parrott pivot-gun, disabled early in the action of the 7th by the enemy's shot, afterwards assisted with his crew at the broadside battery. The paymaster, Wm. A. A. Kerr, acting as signal-officer, by his coolness and watchfulness was of material assistance; he also kept a careful record of the incidents of the several actions. Messrs. Emory, Swasey, McConnell and Lloyds, engineers of the vessel, with great difficulties to contend against, in the general unfitness of the engine, boilers and condensing apparatus for such rough service, managed to carry us through the action, for which I was thankful. Fortunately, the readiness of our medical officer, Mr. Perucer, was not called upon. Master's Mate Duncan, acting as gunner, provided a bountiful supply of ammunition for the battery. I have the honor to be, sir, your obed
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