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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The famous fight at Cedar creek. (search)
el infantry before the western defenses of the National Capital on the 12th of July, and the subsequent burning of Chambersburg by Early's cavalry, under McCausland, had produced a very considerable civilian panic, attracted the anxious attention of the whole country, and convinced Grant, before Petersburg, that decisive measures were required in the neighborhood of the Potomac if he was to retain his grip on the rebel capital. Accordingly, two small-sized infantry corps (Wright's Sixth and Emory's Nineteenth) were dispatched to Washington via Fortress Monroe, and were soon followed by two divisions (the First and Third) of the already famous cavalry corps of the Army of the Potomac. A new Middle Department was erected, and General P. H. Sheridan, as its commander, was given his first opportunity to earn his spurs in control of a separate army and an independent campaign. By the middle of August, the armies of Sheridan and Early confronted each other in the Valley north of Winc
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Baltimore riots. (search)
The Baltimore riots. Frederic Emory. The Baltimore riots of April 18th and 19th, 1861, and the disorders which followed them were, next to the conflict at Fort Sumter, the most exciting and significant of the events which preceded the general outbreak of hostilities between the North and the South. President Lincoln and his Cabinet were seriously inconvenienced, the North was aroused, the leaders of the new Confederacy were led to entertain hopes of valuable assistance from the Border States, and a formidable obstacle was interposed to the active prosecution of those military measures which the government at Washington had decided upon. The attack upon the Massachusetts troops was, in another sense, one of the most remarkable events of the civil war; for, unlike similar disturbances elsewhere, it was largely participated in by the friends of order and the enemies of secession. Parodoxical as the statement may appear, the riots of April, 1861, were the work mainly of the stro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
al Meade at Gettysburg, by Colonel James C. Biddle; General Reynolds' last battle, by Major Joseph G. Rosengarten; Gregg's cavalry at Gettysburg, by Major J. E. Carpenter; How Jefferson Davis was overtaken, by Major-General Wilson; Morgan's Indiana and Ohio raid, by Colonel J. E. McGowan; On the Field of Fredericksburg, by Hon. D. Watson Rowe; Recollections of General Reynolds, by General T. F. McCoy; Some recollections of Grant, by S. H. M. Byers; The Baltimore Riots, by Frederic Emory; The battle of Beverly ford, by Colonel F. C. Newhall; The battle of Shiloh, by Colonel Wills De Hass; The campaign of Gettysburg, by Major-General Alfred Pleasonton; The capture of Mason and Slidell, by R. M. Hunter; The draft Riots in New York, by Major T. P. McElrath; The famous fight at Cedar creek, by General A. B. Nettleton; The First attack on Fort Fisher, by Benson J. Lossing, Ll. D.; The First cavalry, by Captain James A. Stevenson; The First great crime of t