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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
and accuracy of the divisional firing. Acting-Master Spavin's steadiness at the wheel merits commendation. Acting-Master H. N. Parish, who had charge of the Parrott pivot-gun, disabled early in the action of the 7th by the enemy's shot, afterwards assisted with his crew at the broadside battery. The paymaster, Wm. A. A. Kerr, acting as signal-officer, by his coolness and watchfulness was of material assistance; he also kept a careful record of the incidents of the several actions. Messrs. Emory, Swasey, McConnell and Lloyds, engineers of the vessel, with great difficulties to contend against, in the general unfitness of the engine, boilers and condensing apparatus for such rough service, managed to carry us through the action, for which I was thankful. Fortunately, the readiness of our medical officer, Mr. Perucer, was not called upon. Master's Mate Duncan, acting as gunner, provided a bountiful supply of ammunition for the battery. I have the honor to be, sir, your obed
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
and accuracy of the divisional firing. Acting-Master Spavin's steadiness at the wheel merits commendation. Acting-Master H. N. Parish, who had charge of the Parrott pivot-gun, disabled early in the action of the 7th by the enemy's shot, afterwards assisted with his crew at the broadside battery. The paymaster, Wm. A. A. Kerr, acting as signal-officer, by his coolness and watchfulness was of material assistance; he also kept a careful record of the incidents of the several actions. Messrs. Emory, Swasey, McConnell and Lloyds, engineers of the vessel, with great difficulties to contend against, in the general unfitness of the engine, boilers and condensing apparatus for such rough service, managed to carry us through the action, for which I was thankful. Fortunately, the readiness of our medical officer, Mr. Perucer, was not called upon. Master's Mate Duncan, acting as gunner, provided a bountiful supply of ammunition for the battery. I have the honor to be, sir, your obed
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
e 13th and 19th army corps, under Franklin and Emory, and a cavalry division of about 3,500 men, untwo officers of the regular army, Franklin and Emory, in command of divisions, but he seemed to ignons and forage of the mounted infantry. General Emory's corps got into action as the evening wasre enabled to re-form. It was, without doubt, Emory's corps that saved the day, and prevented the and rear. By the skillful manoeuvering of General Emory, the flanks of the two brigades now meetin line of the enemy retreated in disorder under Emory's fire, while fighting continued on the Federaeir position than to attempt a retreat. General Emory, in his official report, says: The enemy eir arduous labors of the following day. General Emory's and A. J. Smith's commands had entire poenemy's left. After some sharp fighting General Emory carried the enemy's position with a loss o driven back with loss. Up to the 25th, General Emory was kept busy in repulsing the numerous at[4 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
ormer under General McClernand, the latter under General Emory; but as the rear of the advanced corps left Alexandria, the advance of the army was commanded by General Emory, and the rear was protected by General A. J. Smirp-shooters, who fell back on their main body as General Emory advanced. No more of General Banks was seen bd. We think he had the highest respect of Franklin, Emory and A. J. Smith, which is a creditable proof of his el Shaw, of General Smith's command, reported to General Emory for duty at Pleasant Hill. As no one stood betwas ordered to proceed to the front and report to General Emory, etc. I could give many other instances where Geeted, General Smith asked me to accompany him to General Emory's quarters. They were soon engaged in earnest conversation, and I heard Emory say there was a bad outlook; that General Banks had just informed him that Colonl hope to escape, had frozen over. We went from General Emory's to Admiral Porter's boat, and General Smith to