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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 79 3 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 58 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 13 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for William H. Emory or search for William H. Emory in all documents.

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too weak to sit up long at a time, and lay in bed while his friend and I sat by and listened. No verbal or other change has been made in the dictation, which Mr. Davis did not read over: Three brothers came to America from Wales in the early part of the eighteenth century. They settled at Philadelphia. The youngest of the brothers, Evan Davis, removed to Georgia, then a colony of Great Britain. He was the grandfather of Jefferson Davis. He married a widow, whose family name was Emory. By her he had one son, Samuel Davis, the father of Jefferson Davis. When Samuel Davis was about sixteen years of age his widowed mother sent him with supplies to his two half-brothers, Daniel and Isaac Williams, then serving in the army of the Revolution. Samuel, after finding his brothers were in active service, decided to join them, and thus remained in the military service of Georgia and South Carolina until the close of the war. After several years of service he gained sufficien
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 22: the secret service fund--charges against Webster, 1845-46. (search)
chard Bache, also an officer of the Navy, drowned while making a survey of the coast; Mrs. Robert J. Walker, the wife of the Secretary of the Treasury and whilom Senator from Mississippi; Mrs. Irwin, wife of the former Minister to Sweden; Mrs. William H. Emory, whose husband was afterward a General in the United States Army, and who was herself a well-known wit; Mrs. Charles Abert; Mrs. Richard Wainright of the Navy, and Mrs. Allen McLane, a woman of marvellous wit, and strong, bright understan a flickering green and gray light, and exhaled a delicate odor. This perfume now brings back a ray of the old joy that used to pervade us all when the family were bidden to supper there. On these occasions Mr. Davis and Professor Bache, General Emory and Mr. Walker, jested like boys, told stories of their West-Point life, or of canvasses for office in Mississippi. I had known Mr. Walker since my infancy, and his wife was my mother's dear and intimate friend before my birth, and sometimes
the present legislature has been called to meet in extraordinary session, and the members having been elected under extraordinary circumstances, no calculation as to their course on this subject can be made by ordinary rules. I believe that Emory Afterward General W. II. Emory, of the United States Army. will lose no reputation by his triumph over the favoritism of the Top. Eng. Bureau, but the Government cannot now gain all which his knowledge of the particular subject would have secur as to their course on this subject can be made by ordinary rules. I believe that Emory Afterward General W. II. Emory, of the United States Army. will lose no reputation by his triumph over the favoritism of the Top. Eng. Bureau, but the Government cannot now gain all which his knowledge of the particular subject would have secured to us, if he had been continued to the position of Astronomer. I am as ever truly your friend, Jefferson Davis. James Alfred Pearce, U. S. Senator, D. C.
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1, Chapter 40: social relations and incidents of Cabinet life, 1853-57. (search)
in the same predetermined artificial way, but had much that was new and interesting to tell. One evening, in the presence of two officers of the army at our house, he said he had ridden camels without a bridle. How did you guide them? said General Emory. By my foot touching them first one side or the other on the nose, answered Mr. Sumner. General Emory took out a pencil and made a calculation, and after Mr. Sumner had passed to other subjects, the General interjected suddenly the remark, AcGeneral Emory took out a pencil and made a calculation, and after Mr. Sumner had passed to other subjects, the General interjected suddenly the remark, According to my calculation, your leg must be nine feet long to guide a camel as you did. Mr. Sumner made no response. He had a large collection of field maps made in the Crimea, and traced the course of the different battles in a very interesting manner with little tin flags. At midsummer we took a house two or three miles out of town, and spent the heated term there, so that I could be near my husband, who was far from robust. Mr. and Mrs. Pierce used frequently to come to us for the