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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 79 3 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 58 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 13 1 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 1 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 9 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for William H. Emory or search for William H. Emory in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The capture of Port Hudson. (search)
ded by Major-General C. C. Augur and Brigadier-Generals Thomas W. Sherman, William H. Emory, and Cuvier Grover. Each division was composed of three brigades with thrd to the rear of Port Hudson on the 14th of March, with the divisions of Augur, Emory, and Grover, for the purpose of cooperating with the fleet by dividing the atte) when the main army began crossing Berwick Bay. Weitzel crossed on the 9th; Emory followed; they then bivouacked on the west bank to wait for Grover's movement. on Madame Porter's plantation, five miles distant. Meanwhile Banks had moved Emory and Weitzel slowly up the Teche, seeking to hold Taylor's forces in position unk within a few miles of the city; but fortunately the illness that had deprived Emory's division of its commander in the field had given New Orleans Seige of Port the inhabitants. Still by the 4th of July things were at such a pass that General Emory plainly told General Banks he must choose between Port Hudson and New Orlea