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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Joseph A. Engelhard or search for Joseph A. Engelhard in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
icsville, he was obliged to return to the hospital, and before the close of the expedition died of typhoid fever. My Aid-de-Camp, W. A. Blount, was severely wounded at Cold Harbor, and Lieutenant Francis J. Hawks, Assistant Engineer, was severely injured on Tuesday. My Ordnance Officer, Lieutenant James A. Bryan, though instructed to remain with his train in the rear, placed it in charge of an assistant and continued with me on the field throughout the expedition. My Quartermaster, Joseph A. Engelhard, did the same as soon as it was possible. All the gentlemen named bore themselves with marked gallantry and devotion. Captain Marmaduke Johnson's battery was attached to my brigade until so much disabled in action as to render it necessary to order it to the rear for repairs. I have reason to think that it performed very important service, but as it was not under my eye, and I have received no report from the Captain, I am not able to report the particulars of its action. I be
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ont. It being then nearly dark, I sent the Major-General a message, informing forming him of my position. He then ordered me to fall back to my original position in the rear of Pegram's battery. On the 3d, my brigade was held in reserve to support the battery in my front. The list of casualties has already been sent in to you. Very respectfully, C. Posey. Brigadier-General. Report of Brigadier-General Edward L. Thomas. headquarters' Thomas' brigade, August 12, 1863. Major J. A. Engelhard, Assistant-Adjutant General: Major — I reply to circular of August 12, 1863. I have the honor to report that this brigade, on July 1st, was, by order of Major-General Pender, formed in line of battle on the left of the road leading to Gettysburg. In this order it advanced to within about one mile of Gettysburg, in readiness to support Major-General Heth's division. From this position the brigade moved still farther to the front, and took a position assigned to it by Lieutenant-