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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 5: Bennington and the Journal of the Times1828-29. (search)
s, white vest, and walked as erect as an Indian (James A. Briggs, in N. Y. Evening Post, August 5, 1879). but the editor of the Journal rarely deigned to notice the attacks on his paper, and never those on himself. He quickly won friends whose admiration and love he never lost, and who attached themselves to him with the loyal devotion which characterized those who followed his leadership in after years. Chief among these, as already mentioned, was James Ballard, the Principal of the Bennington English and Classical Seminary for Young Gentlemen and Ladies, an institution which was the pride of the town, and which attracted pupils from a considerable distance. He was a man born to impress and inspire, and a most successful teacher, combining Ellis's Life of E. H. Chapin, pp. 26-30. firmness with gentleness, physical with moral courage, enthusiasm and energy with a tender, affectionate, and deeply religious nature. The two men were irresistibly attracted to one another, and spent
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 13: Marriage.—shall the Liberator die?George Thompson.—1834. (search)
f that town. His father, Timothy Jackson, was a minute-man who joined in the pursuit of the retreating British on April 19. 1775. He himself was a soldier at Fort Warren in Boston harbor in the War of 1812. He early took an active part in the municipal affairs of Boston, and directed some of its chief territorial improvements, but did not seek office. He was a very tower of strong will, solid judgment, shrewd forecast, sturdy common sense; sparing of words, yet a master of terse, homely English; simple and frugal in his habits, but charitable and hospitable in an unusual degree. He was one of John Pierpont's parishioners, at Hollis-Street Church, vigorously taking his part in the bitter conflict with the rum-selling and pro-slavery element of the congregation. Afterwards he rendered similar services to Theodore Parker. of the Rev. George B. Cheever, and others. We return to Mr. Garrison, who had still one powerful shaft in his quiver—the direct application of anti-slavery sen