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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 13 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The capture of Fort Pillow (April 12th, 1864). (search)
tes were received and delivered. The answer was handed me, written in pencil on a slip of paper, without envelope, and was, as well as I remember, in these words: Negotiations will not attain the desired object. As the officers who were in charge of the Federal flag of truce had expressed a doubt as to my presence, and had pronounced the demand a trick, I handed them back the note, saying, I am General Forrest; go back and say to Major Booth that I demand an answer in plain, unmistakable English: Will he fight or surrender? Returning to my original position, before the expiration of twenty minutes I received a reply . . . [Major Booth replied, We will not surrender. ] . . . While these negotiations were pending the steamers from below were rapidly approaching the fort. The foremost was the Olive Branch, whose position and movements indicated her intention to land. A few shots fired into her caused her [to] leave the shore and make for the opposite. One other boat passed up
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Actions on the Weldon Railroad. (search)
s division by way of precaution. Evidently he expected Mott first at the junction. At 5 o'clock Hill had opened with his artillery, both shot and shell, some of which took the works, so-called, in reverse, but did little actual damage other than demoralizing the men, of whom there were many, even in the old regiments, who never had come to fight, but to run on the first chance, or get into the hospital, and, ho! for a pension afterward! Some of their officers could not speak a word of English, says Hancock in his report, and were therefore without that mutual intelligence and support which battle demands, and with nothing in common with their men but panic. The first assault came on Miles, opposite his Fourth Brigade, and at a part of the line held by the consolidation of material of different regiments. For a time the severity of Miles's fire, the slashing and other obstacles on the ground, staggered the assaulting column, and they must have baffled it completely if the fir
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 13.95 (search)
r, the Shamrock planted a shell in the enemy's magazine, which blew up, whereupon the Confederates hastily abandoned their works. In a short time Plymouth was entirely in possession of the Union forces. The casualties on the Union side were six killed and nine wounded. The vessels engaged were as follows: Doubleenders: Shamrock, Commander W. H. Macomb, commanding division, Lieutenant Rufus K. Duer, executive officer; Otsego, Lieutenant-Commander H. N. T. Arnold; Wyalusing, Lieutenant-Commander Earl English; Tacony, Lieutenant-Commander W. T. Truxtun. Ferry-boat: Commodore Hull, Acting Master Francis Josselyn. Gun-boat: Whitehead, Acting Master G. W. Barrett. Tugs: Belle, Acting Master James G. Green; Bazley, Acting Master Mark D. Ames. The Chicopee, Commander A. D. Harrell, and Valley City, Acting Master J. A. J. Brooks, were not present at the second and final demonstration.--J. R. Soley. Note on the destruction of the Albemarle. by her Captain, A. F. Warley, C. S. N.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 37: operations of the East Gulf Squadron to October, 1863. (search)
t schooner in mosquito inlet. expedition up Indian River and other points. capture of schooner and sloop. Lieutenant-Commander English in gun-boat Sagamore explores coast. value of property seized. violation of blockade. the sloop Helen burntquadron would have something more interesting to report than the capture of a salt crop. Late in February, Lieutenant-Commander Earl English, in command of the gun-boat Sagamore, received information that a schooner was in Mosquito Inlet, Florida, aster's Mate Henry A. Crane reports the results of an expedition up Indian River, under the instructions of Lieutenant-Commander Earl English. On the morning of February 23d, he started in a boat and reached a cove five miles above the mouth of Sing all those who deserved it an opportunity to distinguish themselves. On March 24th, 1863, he directed Lieutenant-Commander Earl English to proceed to Cedar Keys with the gunboat Sagamore, taking with him two armed launches from the flag-ship S
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., chapter 48 (search)
ell had foreseen had now come to pass, and the United States carrying-trade was being transferred to English hands. The papers of these vessels were so carefully made out that Semmes' Court of Admiralty did not dare meddle with them, as a rule; however, he was enraged at seeing such prizes slip through his judicial fingers; but on the 20th of June the fates were propitious in bringing another fly to the Alabama's web. This was the bark Conrad, of Philadelphia, and although her cargo was English, she was taken possession of and quickly converted into a vessel-of-war. Three or four officers, a dozen men, and the two captured field-pieces were put on board the little clipper with a celerity that would have astonished Mr. Gideon Welles, and the new Confederate cruiser was christened the Tuscaloosa. The baptismal ceremony was not elaborate. When all was ready, signal was given, the Tuscaloosa ran up the Confederate flag, and the crew of the Alabama gave three cheers, which were duly
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
o the Sound. Thus far the expedition was a failure. Something must be done, and from the reports of the Valley City, and a reconnoissance made by Lieutenant-Commander Earl English in a boat, it was found that there was plenty of water in the channel of Middle River, and that any of the vessels could turn the bends with the assi Bazley, Acting-Ensign M. D. Ames, having on board the pilot of the Wyalusing; next came the Otsego, Lieutenant-Commander H. N. T. Arnold; Wyalusing, Lieutenant-Commander Earl English; Tacony, Lieutenant-Commander Wm. T. Truxtun; Commodore Hull, Acting-Master Francis Josselyn, in the order named. Owing to the skill of the pilot, Ae explosion of a magazine on shore. This vessel was one of those frail craft of which we have so often spoken, in which so much was dared and done. Lieutenant-Commander English, in the Wyalusing, had the forethought, when the enemy began to retreat, to cover the road by which they were moving off with his guns and kept up a ra
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
nd then capture the schooners; but he failed in this, owing to the tide, which carried him so far out of his course that he found himself close aboard the schooners. Without hesitation, orders were given Mr. Reynolds to board one, while Mr. French carried the other. Both were taken without resistance, though the crews aggregated twenty men, nearly equal to the crews of the two boats. The Princess Royal's cutter captured the Annie Sophia. and the Bienville's, the Pet, both supposed to be English. After getting the schooners underway and securing their crews, one was placed in charge of Boatswain's Mate, Thomas Gallyer, of the Bienville, and the other in charge of Acting-Master's Mate Johnson, with orders to proceed to the Bienville, where they subsequently arrived in safety. Mr. French then proceeded in company with the other boat to perform the duty of destroying the Wren; but, finding it impracticable (owing to the strong current and wind against him, with his reduced crews) to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), English, Earl, 1824-1893 (search)
English, Earl, 1824-1893 Naval officer; born in Crosswicks, N. J., Feb. 18, 1824; entered the navy Feb. 25, 1840; was actively engaged during the Mexican War on the Pacific coast in Mexico and California; also served throughout the Civil War. In 1868, when the Tycoon of Japan was defeated by the Mikado's party, he found refuge on Commander English's ship Iroquois. He was promoted rear-admiral in 1884; retired in 1886. He died in Washington, D. C., July 16, 1893. English, Earl, 1824-1893 Naval officer; born in Crosswicks, N. J., Feb. 18, 1824; entered the navy Feb. 25, 1840; was actively engaged during the Mexican War on the Pacific coast in Mexico and California; also served throughout the Civil War. In 1868, when the Tycoon of Japan was defeated by the Mikado's party, he found refuge on Commander English's ship Iroquois. He was promoted rear-admiral in 1884; retired in 1886. He died in Washington, D. C., July 16, 1893.
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
r service as a man-of-war. In making the alterations, she had been cut down so as to leave the deck about two feet above the water when loaded. From this deck rose a casemate, with a flat roof and inclined sides. Within the casemate were four Brooke rifles, two VI 1/10-inch in the midship ports, and two Viiā€“inch on pivots at the bow and stern, so contrived that they could be fired either laterally or fore-and-aft. The armor protecting this powerful battery was four inches thick, made of English railroad iron, rolled into two-inch plates. The deck was of enormous strength, and its edges projected six feet from the side of the vessel, the projection being filled in and protected with a heavy covering of wood and iron. The Atlanta's bow ended in a ram, over which projected a torpedo spar. She was in every way one of the most powerful vessels which the Confederates had got afloat; and great things were expected of her. Intimations had reached Admiral Dupont that the Atlanta and
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
gainst a strong flood tide and a fresh wind; and the two officers of the boats were the only people who could return the fire. The leading boat had barely got out of range, when the prize capsized. Nothing daunted, Crosman pulled back under the fire of the troops, which covered the prize, and endeavored to right her; but after some time spent in unavailing efforts, he scuttled and sank her, returning with the loss of only one man to his ship. The ferry-boat Somerset, under Lieutenant-Commander Earl English, attacked the salt-works near Depot Key on October 4, 1862. After a few shells had been fired, a white flag was hoisted on the works, and a party was sent on shore to destroy them. No sooner had the party landed, than they were fired upon from the building displaying the flag of truce, and half of them were disabled. Immediately after the affair, the gunboat Tahoma arrived, under Commander John C. Howell. A strong force was landed, led by Crosman with his usual energy and j