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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 20 0 Browse Search
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James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Florence Nightingale. (search)
had done nothing else in her life but produce this wise, kind, and pointed little work, she would deserve the gratitude of suffering man. The book, too, although remarkably free from direct allusions to herself, contains much biographical material. We see the woman on every page,--the woman who takes nothing for granted, whom sophistry cannot deceive, who looks at things with her own honest eyes, reflects upon them with her own fearless mind, and speaks of them in good, downright, Nightingale English. She ever returns to her grand, fundamental position, the curative power of fresh, pure air. Disease, she remarks, is not an evil, but a blessing; it is a reparative process,--an effort of nature to get rid of something hostile to life. That being the case, it is of the first importance to remove what she considers the chief cause of disease,--the inhaling of poisonous air. She laughs to .scorn the impious cant, so often employed to console bereaved parents, that the death of childr
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Lydia Maria child. (search)
e distinctly disavowed. If readers complain of want of profoundness, they may perchance be willing to accept simplicity and clearness in exchange for depth. Doubtless a learned person would have performed the task far better, in many respects; but, on some accounts, my want of learning is an advantage. Thoughts do not range so freely, when the store-room of the brain is overloaded with furniture. And she gives at the end, with her usual frankness, a list of works consulted, all being in English, except seven, which are in French. It was a bold thing to base a history of religious ideas on such books as Enfield's Philosophy and Taylor's Plato. The trouble was not so much that the learning was second-hand,--for such is most learning,--as that the authorities were second-rate. The stream could hardly go higher than its source; and a book based on such very inadequate researches could hardly be accepted, even when tried by that very accommodating standard, American scholarship.
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Eugenie, Empress of the French. (search)
mother. It is said that a part of her education was acquired in England, and. that she has enjoyed the advantages of the best schools in France. Thus she speaks English, Spanish, and French with equal fluency. There is no court in Europe where the claims of etiquette are more rigidly observed than in the royal palaces of Madrid.t of the Church of England, and the other of the Church of Rome. Eugenie loved England. Her grandfather was an Englishman. Many of her dearest relatives were English; much of her education was English. The emperor, a man of warm affections, could not forget the hospitable welcome he had received in London, when an exile, baniEnglish. The emperor, a man of warm affections, could not forget the hospitable welcome he had received in London, when an exile, banished by Bourbon law from his own country, simply because his name was Napoleon Bonaparte. The emperor has also ever been ready to render the tribute of his admiration to the institutions of England. Thus both Louis Napoleon and Eugenie could be happy as the guests of Queen Victoria. There was moral sublimity in the event itsel
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
of the house. Under her strong supervision, two out of the five boys went honorably through Harvard College,--a third having previously graduated,while the young sister was sent to the best schools, where she showed the family talent. In the autumn of 1836, Margaret Fuller went to Boston, where she taught Latin and French in Mr. Alcott's school, and had classes of young ladies in French, German, and Italian. She also devoted one evening in every week to translating German authors into English, for the gratification of Dr. Channing,--their chief reading being in De Wette and Herder. The following extract will show how absorbing were her occupations:-- And now let me try to tell you what has been done. To one class I taught the German language, and thought it good success, when, at the end of three months, they could read twenty pages of German at a lesson, and very well. This class, of course, was not interesting, except in the way of observation and analysis of language.
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Eminent women of the drama. (search)
oved a labor of ease as well as of love. In her musical studies the child made rapid progress; and she also acquired, with rare facility, five modern languages,--English, Italian, French, German, and Spanish. At the age of sixteen--in 1855-she made her first public appearance in opera, in the city of Malta. Amina, in Sonnambula, s, she has attained lofty eminence; nor has she been less esteemed as a woman than admired as an artist. It seems proper, therefore, to select her as the representative English actress of her time. The portraits of Helen Faucit --portraits that, of course, were made long ago — represent a tall, elegant figure; a frank, sweet, ex ever will come to this country, on a professional expedition. American knowledge of her acting, therefore, must depend on the study of English stage records and English criticism. Those authorities bear ample testimony to the brilliancy of her past career and the sterling worth of her talents and character. Adverse opinion has
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Advertisement: The Philosophy of Housekeeping (search)
omizing millions of our land. It is not a sensation story, nor a re-hash of miscellaneous writers, but springs directly from the study, the experience, and the wide observation of its authors. There has never been written in this country, nor in England, any work upon these familiar topics which is at the same time so useful and so entertaining. The homely details of the kitchen, the nursery, and the sewing-room, are here invested with the charms of happy treatment and the graces of pure English. There cannot be brought to any family in the land a book which the agent can more confidently recommend for intrinsic value as a book of daily reference. The duties of the housekeeper, the cares and responsibilities of the wife and the mother, are illuminated by all the light of modern science; and the last discoveries in chemistry reduced to immediate practical utility. Though a scientific work, everybody can understand it; and whoever picks it up to get instruction, will continue to