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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 43 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 42 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 38 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 28 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 27 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 22 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 20 0 Browse Search
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Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, III: the boy student (search)
ulllook-ing Baltimore negroes and a lively colored waiter whom he had made friends with at the New York hotel, and added, Slaves and a freeman is the difference, I suppose. While in Virginia, Wentworth received this letter from his mother, with its pathetic reference to her son Thacher's fatal voyage:— Now for news—Thacher sailed yesterday for Rio Janeiro. . . . He took out Books of all kinds, Scientific and literary. Theology, Law, History, Poetry, Philosophy, French, Spanish and English— he expects to be home in July. . . . I hope you will be able to come to some determination during this pilgrimage—what you would like best to do after you leave College. . . . At any rate the next term had better decide the business as it is very important that from the time you graduate you should be able to support yourself independently and be able even to lay up something to carry you through your Profession or to help you along during the first years of your setting out. From
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, IX: the Atlantic Essays (search)
ive a charming letter from Agassiz, begging me to collect corals, starfishes, etc., of which I already have a store. And after his return, he reported:— I spent part of yesterday with Prof. Agassiz and enjoyed it very much, and he was delighted with my collection from the Azores especially the sea-urchins, of which he found eight species, some of them new. Some of the things he is to return to me, labelled, for the [Worcester] Natural History Society. The home-coming from Fayal Mr. Higginson described in this letter to his mother:— We arrived last night at 9 1/2 [June, 1856] after a three weeks passage. . . . The world looks very odd, people talking English, lighted shops last night, and horses. To-day everybody with bonnets and shoes! People so well dressed, so intelligent, and so sick—so unlike the robust baseness of Fayal and Pico. And the foliage is so inexpressibly beautiful. Houses agonizingly warm, after the fireless rooms of Fayal, and the chilly o
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XI: John Brown and the call to arms (search)
ry to guard the building to prevent the meetings from being broken up by riotous young men. Mr. Higginson described this new duty in a letter, dated January, 1861, referring to the annual meeting of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society:— This week has been given over to mobs; I have been one of the captains of the fifties spoken of in Scripture; that is we had sixty men armed and organized, under my direction, to protect the platform and Wendell Phillips. Part were Germans and part English; this was done prior to the Sunday meeting at Music Hall, but there was no danger then; before the end of the convention it grew rather formidable. It was worth it all to see Mr. Emerson addressing the meeting and interrupted with all kinds of insults and he so utterly undisturbed,— not stooping even to control and put it down, which might perhaps just then have been done—but rising above it by sheer dignity. Wendell Phillips never was so buoyant and charming as through it all. Many have <
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XII: the Black regiment (search)
orial, when the war is over, of my share in it. After the presentation of this sword he reported:— Jan. 8, 1864. Did I tell you that after the New Year's Festivals, the little Tribune correspondent came to me for my wemarks (he is English, 3 feet high; and a goosey) and the inscription on my sword. I could not give him the former but the latter was easily made visible. It ran thus Tiffany & Co. New York. These three swords entwined with a faded sash are still where Colonet altogether. Uncle York finally officiated in driving to the grave, and as the vehicle jolted over the roots in the woods he says, I did n't care how much I jolt he—I pure tink of my money all de time. This use of the word pure is genuine old English. Meantime the chaplain of the regiment, who had been in the habit of varying his spiritual duties by daring forays into the enemy's country, was captured. The Colonel wrote, March 26, 1864:— We have just heard from our dear old Chapla<
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XIII: Oldport Days (search)
he wrote:— This feeling of fertility is a happy thing, it enriches all life and enables me to do without many things. In analyzing his own style, the author noted in his journal:— I have fineness and fire, but some want of copiousness and fertility which may give a tinge of thinness to what I write . . . . What an abundance, freshness and go there is about the Beechers, for instance. They are egotistic, crotchety and personally disagreeable, and they often make fritters of English but I wish I could, without sacrificing polish, write with that exuberant and hearty zeal . . . Shakespeare may have written as the birds sing, though I doubt it—but minor writers at least have to labor for form as the painter labors—the mere inspiration of thought is not enough. . . . There must be a golden moment but also much labor within that moment. At least it is so with me, and I cannot help suspecting that it is even so with the Shakespeares. On New Year's Day, 1866, the thou
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, XV: journeys (search)
en ascetic jaw—eyes and mouth full of mobility and sensitiveness, the most winning voice and manner, as much American as English, and speaking so nobly and sweetly and humanly. I never felt more the power of the Roman Catholic Church than in seeingreation and form of activity, and spoke of the great danger of overwork to all. He seemed to have the common impression (English) that there is less freedom of thought in America than here, which seems to me quite untrue. He thought any seeming shrothed and softened they say but a Herald reporter still—not of distinguished look but with a resolute air—accent neither English, American nor French—talks of course about himself mainly but not in a specially conceited way—and seems perfectly incapsekeeper said to him, Are you an American gentleman, sir? You don't speak like one. I should have taken you rather for English. He said, rather severely, I suppose you mean that for a compliment, but I don't consider it one. Ah, said she, but