hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 43 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 42 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 38 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 28 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 27 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for English or search for English in all documents.

Your search returned 21 results in 12 document sections:

1 2
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
th), and Elmsley, the writer of the Greek articles in the Quarterly Review. In a note subsequently added, Mr. Ticknor stated that Elmsley was not the writer of the articles ascribed to him. He expressed to me his surprise that I spoke so good English, and spoke it, too, without an accent, so that he should not have known me from an Englishman. This is the first instance I have yet met of this kind of ignorance. He is himself a cockney. June 19.—Among other persons, I brought letters to nd was announced, the dancing stopped, out of compliment to him, as Emperor; but Jack Towers cried out, No, no, my boys, none of that. You're aboard the King's ship, and Bony's no more here than any other man. So, strike up again. The band was English, and obeyed. When they first received an intimation of the unfriendly dispositions of the Algerine government, and before their determinations were known, two of the frigates went down to Algiers, to ascertain by personal inquiry. Captain F
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 4: (search)
ver done it, I had never spoken a word of Latin; but the moment I began, the difficulty vanished. I found that I could translate thus nearly as fast as into my mother tongue; in short, I found that I knew a great deal more Latin than I suspected, I shall hereafter use it upon all emergencies without hesitation. My instructor, Dr. Schultze, Schultze was a man of genius, and a poet as well as a scholar. He wrote Psyche, Cecilia, The Enchanted Rose, (which last has been translated into English,) and many miscellaneous poems. He was but two years older than Mr. Ticknor, having been born in 1789. He died in 1817. After his death, his works were collected and published by his friend Bouterweck, with a short sketch of his life. A new edition appeared in Leipsic in 1855, in four volumes, with a more full biography. An account of his life and works may be found in the third volume of Taylor's Historic Survey of German Poetry. is one of the private lecturers here, and is considered
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 5: (search)
ediate purpose. Thus, a few days ago, as I had denied that the Americans use the Indian steam-baths made by pouring water upon hot stones, the old gentleman had come with a curious letter of William Penn's on the subject, which he read aloud in English; but as this went no further than to the Indians, and not to the whites, he adroitly inserted a sentence or two gratis, from which it seemed the practice was common in Boston; and he did the thing so admirably that I did not at first suspect the. Rose is about forty-five or fifty years old, has long been in the English diplomacy, and came here directly from Munich, a year since, where he has been minister nearly two years. . . . . In his manners he is more American and democratic than English, and even in his dress there was a kind of popular carelessness which does not belong to his nation. He talks, too, without apparent reserve on subjects private and political, said a great deal of his mission to America, pronounced Jefferson to
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
erland, much better. She looked on her daughter, while her eyes filled with tears, and said in English, God grant me that favor, and I left her. The impression of this scene remained upon us all gladly give a year to learn German, for he considered it now the most important language, after English, for a man of letters; and added with a kind of decision which showed he had thought of the suband have taste enough to prefer Italian and German to either French, which I find frivolous, or English, which seems to me unmeaning. At sunset always came a walk,—not as in our own more decisive cly in work and reading. French was the language of conversation, but all the party understood English, and therefore Shakespeare and Milton came in for their share. This naturally produced discussin the evening. Do not misunderstand me. I do not regret that we have none of this comedy in English, for I deprecate the character and principles out of which it grows, and should lose no inconsi
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
character, carried me to tea at M. Pictet Deodati's, brother of Prof. Pictet, and chief-justice of the canton: a plain, sensible gentleman, who reminded me of the same class of persons in America. I passed a couple of hours happily at his house, and then, with the same sort of hospitality which had brought me to him, he ordered his carriage and took me to Geneva, to a ball at Mad. de Saussure's, a distant relation of the famous De Saussure who first ascended Mont Blanc. I found there many English, and much of the fashionable and respectable society of the city; and I observed that the ladies were handsomer than at Paris, but not so graceful; and seemingly more genuinely and simply kind and amiable, but not so ostentatiously gracious. Among other strangers, I found Simond, author of the Travels in England, a man of fifty, talking little, but in such a manner as to make others talk to him; with few apparent prejudices, and yet in all respects a decisive way of thinking and judging.
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
ainly nobody was ever less obnoxious from heresy in Spain than I was, for my best friends were always of the Church. The Nuncio and a shrewd little secretary he had even thought to convert me by putting good books into my hands, though I should never have suspected it if the Prince de Laval had not let me into the secret. Two attempts were made to convert Mr. Ticknor to Catholicism. Once at Rome, being at a grand funzione, a priest who stood near him and his companion addressed them in English, which he heard them speaking, and they found he was an American of the name of Patterson. His history, as afterwards told to Mr. Ticknor by Mr. George Harrison, was a curious one. He was a Philadelphian, rich, handsome, at the head of fashion, the best billiard player in town. He was still quite young when he was converted, and he immediately gave his property to the Church, keeping only a small stipend for himself; had his teeth pulled to destroy his beauty, and became a priest and an
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
where there are woods, if there is nothing else. These domains extend for many miles round the convent, and, even before I entered them, its domes and towers springing up on the dark, barren sides of the mountain, upon whose declivity it stands, were already visible. I spurred my horse with eagerness to greater speed, and just before eight o'clock reached the little village that has been formed round it, having, in this expeditious and not unpleasant mode of travelling, gone thirty-five (English) miles in four hours. The Escorial is as vulgar a name as the Tuileries. It signifies the place where scoria are thrown, and it is so called because there was formerly an iron manufactory near, that threw its scoria on this spot. Its more just name is San Lorenzo el Reale, since it is a royal convent, dedicated to Saint Lorenzo. It is a monument of the magnificence, the splendor, the superstition, and perhaps the personal fears of Philip II. It was at the battle of St. Quintin, which
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
le gardens abounding in fruits, water, and shade, belonging to the better sort of peasantry, of which no trace is to be found in the rest of the Peninsula. As to the character of the people, they have not the Spanish force and decision, but neither have they the Spanish coldness, pride, and obstinacy. They are even polite and gentle, so that the first peasant I met seemed to me to be asking alms, when he was only bidding me God speed; and in their houses, owing to the free introduction of English manufactures for above an hundred years, under the Methuen treaty, they have more conveniences and are able to receive you more comfortably than in Spain. In short, from what five days experience taught me, which is a good proportion of all that can be known in this little kingdom, I would rather travel in Portugal than in Spain, though my guides, with true Spanish exclusiveness, were every moment reminding me how much worse it was. On the 23d, just five months from the day I entered M
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
ectric principle that gives life to the dead mass of inefficient knowledge, and vigor and spirit to inquiry. Besides this, I desire to learn something of Scottish literature and literary history, and pick up my library in this department and in English. It is not a great deal; if it were, I might shrink from it. I began this morning, recollecting that the longer I suffer myself to defer it, the longer I must be kept from you. The first person I went to see was Mrs. Grant. . . . . I had notqualified to give them, Walter Scott, Mr. Jamieson, Dr. Anderson, and Mr. Thomson. Mr. Jamieson comes to me every morning, and we have read Scotch poetry together, from the earliest times down to our own day, until it has become as easy to me as English. But I wish him to continue a week longer, for in every literature there are many things to be learnt besides the words and the language, which can never be learnt but on the spot, because they are never preserved but as a kind of tradition, e
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
. Ticknor. An early death cut short the high career of the Baron de Stael, and caused a loss both to friendship and to letters, which Mr. Ticknor always continued to regret. In concluding a short note, dated March 17, 1819, M. de Stael says:— Laissez moi esperer, que j'aurai encore quelques lignes de vous, avant de passer l'atlantique; et que vous n'oublierez pas des amis, qui vous sont bien tendrement attaches. In 1825 the following interesting letter came from him, written in English, so nearly perfect that it is given here exactly from the autograph. Coppet, August 10, 1825. my dear Ticknor,—It is an object of most sincere regret to me, that it was not in my power to be of any use to your friends in Paris, and to express to them the gratitude and friendship which I feel for you. Your kind letter reached me here a few days ago, and I had left Paris about the middle of June. Nothing can be more striking than your observations on Lafayette's journey, and your pictu
1 2