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Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 43 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 42 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 38 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 32 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 28 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 27 1 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 26 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 22 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 22 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard). You can also browse the collection for English or search for English in all documents.

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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
d warmhearted kindness as ever. It was a great pleasure to see him. December 8.—. . . . The evening we spent at the Prussian Minister's, Mr. Bunsen's, whose wife is an English lady. There was a large party, consisting chiefly of Germans and English. I was introduced to many, but remember few, except Wolff, the sculptor, some of whose beautiful works were in the tasteful rooms; Lepsius, who is now distinguishing himself in Egyptian antiquities; Kestner, the Hanoverian Minister, and son of reform and American slavery, and such exciting topics as necessarily produced lively talk. We sat long at table, and then I carried Dr. Bowring to Mr. Trevelyan's, Since Sir Walter Calverley Trevelyan, Bart. where there was a small party of English, but none so interesting as himself and his wife. January 2, 1837.—. . . . In the evening we went for a short time to the Princess Massimo's. We brought letters to her, but did not deliver them until lately, because they have been in great af
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 4: (search)
I have seen a good deal of within the last three weeks, and who is full of knowledge, wisdom, and gentleness; I mean Mr. Elphinstone, who wrote the Embassy to Cabul, was thirty years in India, was long Governor of Bombay, and refused to be Governor-General of India. It is rare to meet a more interesting man. Right Hon. Mountstuart Elphinstone. February 6.—. . . . We dined to-day at Prince Massimo's, and met there the Prince, his son; Monsignor; several other Italians; three or four English, whom we are in the habit of meeting everywhere in society, . . . . a party of thirteen or fourteen. Some rooms in their magnificent palace were opened which we had not seen before, which are worthy of the oldest of the Roman families; particularly a large saloon painted in fresco by Giulio Romano, in one corner of which is the famous ancient statue of the Discobolus, for which the Prince was offered twelve thousand of our dollars, and was able—which few Roman princes would be—to refuse i<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
. . In the evening I was presented at Court, which took a tedious while; for I left home before seven o'clock and did not get back till nearly ten, the first hour being spent in assembling, with eight or ten other Americans, at General Cass's and getting to the palace, an hour and a half at the palace itself, and half an hour to find my carriage and get home . . . . . I think about an hundred and thirty persons were presented. Of these, perhaps seven or eight were Austrians, sixty or more English, one Russian,—my friend Tourgueneff,—and the rest chiefly Germans, with a few Italians and Spaniards. The Russians are hardly permitted to come to Paris now, or, if they do come, hardly dare to be presented at Court, so small is the ill — will of the Emperor, and so detailed his inquisition into private affairs. Tourgueneff avowed it to me as we went up the stairs. When we were all arranged in a row round the two halls of audience, with the ambassadors and ministers in the order of th<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 7: (search)
midst of. political disputes between some of those who, even on this neutral ground, could not help the ascendancy of the partisanship that governs them everywhere else. The Diplomacy—except at Lord Granville's, which was always flooded with English, and at General Cass's, which was nothing but stupid-had no open salons this winter . . . . . The effect of the whole of this is, that the society of Paris is less elegant than it used to be. Its numbers are greater and its tone lower, and politged to stop a little. Anna, who likes the salons less than I do, goes out less; but enough to see all the forms in which, from the politics or the taste of the people, they appear. . . . . One thing strikes me in all these places. I find no English. Though there are thirty thousand now in Paris, they can hardly get any foothold in French society, and it is only when you are at a great ball—at Court or elsewhere—that you meet them. These balls are separate things, entirely, from the prop<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 10: (search)
health and happiness and little sorrow since we saw you. We all remember Dresden, and its hospitalities, with much pleasure and gratitude, and hope we have friends there who will not entirely forget us. Mrs. Ticknor desires that her acknowledgments and compliments may be offered to you. I remain, my dear Prince, Very faithfully and affectionately yours, George Ticknor. From Prince John, of Saxony. Dresden, 4 July, 1842. dear Sir, Prince John always wrote to Mr. Ticknor in English, and the correspondence continued till the end of Mr. Ticknor's life.—I have received, with great pleasure, your letter and the books and newspapers you had the kindness to send me. Mr. Stephens's work seems to be very interesting. I have, methinks, found some time ago a notice of it, in the Augsburger Allgemeine Zeitung. My sister being in this moment at Florence, the newspapers are to make a journey into the bel paese la dove'l si suona. I am sure the author will be much charmed by it,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 12: (search)
one of a popular character, could reach at once in England. This shows that America is fast taking a high position as a literary country; the next half-century will be abundantly productive of good authors in your Union. And it is yet to be observed that there is not, nor probably will be, a distinct American school The language is absolutely the same, all slight peculiarities being now effaced; and there seems nothing in the turn of sentiment or taste which a reader can recognize as not English. This is not only remarkable in such works as yours and Mr. Prescott's, but even, as it strikes me, in the lighter literature, as far as I see it, of poetry or belles-lettres . . . . You will, I hope, be pleased to learn that Lord Mahon has proposed your name as an Honorary Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries. You will be united in this with Everett, Prescott, and Bancroft. Lord Mahon, as President of the Society, said at its annual meeting, April 23, 1850: It is also with great pl
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 15: (search)
Ticknor's purchases the Library was saved all commissions. On the 2d of February he closed his third box of books bought in Rome; making in the three boxes seven hundred and eighty-nine volumes, chiefly Italian, but a good many French, and some English, etc., which have cost, binding inclusive (but not emballage), five hundred and five dollars. In one of his letters to Mr. Everett, from Rome, he refers to the fact that five sixths of the books then in the Library were in the English language, and to intimations he had received of a feeling among some persons in favor of making the Library exclusively English. After alluding to his original anxiety to have a popular circulating library, with many copies of many popular books, he goes on:— I do not, indeed, want for my personal convenience any library at all, except my own, but I should be ashamed of myself, if, in working for such an institution as our Public Library, I could overlook the claims of the poor young men, and oth
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
me sit with him, whenever I could find half an hour for it. He is a man of good fortune, but as simple-hearted and unsophisticated a mere German scholar as I have ever known, reading nearly all languages worth it, and talking several, especially English, very well. . . . . Gregorovius, too, is here, whose remarkable book on Corsica was not only translated into English, but had the honor of a separate translation in the United States. He has been employed the last four years on a history of English, but had the honor of a separate translation in the United States. He has been employed the last four years on a history of Rome for the eleven centuries and more that elapsed between its first occupation by the barbarians and its capture by the Constable Bourbon; a well-limited period, taking in what may most fairly be called the Middle Ages. He assigns six years more to his most difficult task, living here meanwhile in straightened circumstances, but with a very bright, cheerful nature, that seems to gild his dark hours as they move on . . . . . I said at the beginning of my letter that Rome is a good place to li
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 18: (search)
h. Indeed, it was well worth while; for nobody talks as well as he does, not even Villemain or Mignet, who have the more brilliant epigrammatic style of recent fashion, while he talks with the beautiful grace and finish of the ancien regime. Once or twice when Macaulay was present this produced a curious contrast. He —Macaulay, I mean-talked French, indeed, and not bad as to idiom, but it was most amusingly hard and unwieldy, and poured forth, if not as triumphantly as he pours forth his English, yet with the same tone and accent. . . . . July 14.—Your letter of June 27, addressed to Anna, came this morning. Thank you for it as much as if it were addressed to me, for I have had the full benefit of it. So have sundry of your friends, —as far as good news about you are concerned,—for I read it on my way down to Milman's, where I met the Heads, the Lyells, Macaulay, and Elwin, the editor of the Quarterly, all of whom were glad to hear about you. We had a most agreeable breakfast;
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
nd. It is a fine modern castle, built on a hillside, which is full of varieties of surface and charming glens, and commands grand views of the sea at every opening. The possessor, Mr. Hamborough, is a middle-aged man with a family of beautiful English children, and much devoted to botany and wood-craft. His place bears proofs abundant of his good taste, as well as of his great resources. Just after we arrived all the school-children of the neighborhood— about one hundred and eighty—came in after Sir Walter's own heart; many very curious, but all bought because he wanted them. His chief studies, as you may remember, were in botany, mineralogy, and geology, but he has done a good deal in Oriental literature, and is very rich in old English—having been one of the Bannatyne Club --and in the local literature and history of Northumberland. Indeed, it is a very precious library, and although I care nothing about one half of it, the other half interests me more than any similar collec<
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