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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 34 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 3, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Thomas Dunn English or search for Thomas Dunn English in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 10: Thoreau (search)
stasy of ours can lower its height, or dim its lustre, but there it lies in the east of literature, as it were the earliest and latest production of the mind. From the wildwood simplicity of Walden, he startles the reader with deliverances which might have come from the Bodleian. Those who have not learned to read the ancient classics in the language in which they were written must have a very imperfect knowledge of the history of the human race. . . . Homer has never been printed in English, nor Aeschylus, nor Virgil even,—works as refined, as solidly done, as beautiful almost as the morning itself; for later writers, say what we will of their genius, have rarely if ever equalled the elaborate beauty and finish and the lifelong and heroic literary labours of the ancients. Thoreau translated the Prometheus Vinctus and tried his hand at Pindar. His pages are sown with classical allusions and quotations. The sunset at Cape Cod brings a line of Homer into his memory with a
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 14: Poe (search)
dle of the year (May to October) he published, in Godey's Lady's Book, his Literati, a series of biographical—critical papers dealing with the chief living writers of Gotham; and the year was further made memorable by the controversy with Thomas Dunn English engendered by the publication of the Literati, and by a scandal growing out of his friendship with the poetess, Mrs. F. S. Osgood. Early in 1847 the poet's wife died, and throughout the year, as indeed during the preceding year, the family altered as to be scarcely recognizable in their final recast. His melody, especially in his later poems, grows in large measure out of his all but unexampled use of parallelism and of the refrain. C. A. Smith, Repetition and parallelism in English Verse, pp. 44 f. Not a little of his charm, moreover, both in his earlier and in his later work, results from his use of symbolism. It is idle to complain that his best verses—as Israfel or The haunted Palace —are superficial; and it is futile<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 17: writers on American history, 1783-1850 (search)
full of taste and eloquence; full of life and power. You give us not wretched paste-board men; not a sort of chronological table, with the dates written out at length, after the manner of most historians;—but you give us real, individual, living, men and women, with their passions, interests, and peculiarities. Theodore Parker wrote: I think you are likely to make, what I long since told you I looked for from you, the most noble and splendid piece of historical composition, not only in English, but in any tongue. Emerson said of the History: It is noble matter, and I am heartily glad to have it nobly treated. Bancroft is less than a quarter of a century dead, and these beautiful laurels are already withered. A new age has accepted other standards than his. Bancroft, our first historian who had studied in Germany, was well known at home and abroad as a hard student and a man of great learning. The abundant foot-notes in the first volumes of his history show how freely he u
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
Thus it was, in 1821, that he decided to take up his pen as an occupation. Very deliberately he proceeded to examine the tools of expression that were ready to his hand. He found them very defective. He had no well-based accurate knowledge of English, let alone modern languages. Accordingly, on 30 October, 1821, he planned a preliminary course to lay accurate foundations for a literary career. Blair's Rhetoric, Lindley Murray, the introductory chapter of Johnson's Dictionary were studied at had been adequately treated by French or Spanish writers, Prescott began original work by mastering the chronicles of Andres Bernaldez as a first-hand source. Luckily the secretary devoted to his service was an able young Harvard graduate, a Mr. English, capable of supplementing the author's eyes, and sympathetic with his methods. The copy of Bernaldez obtained was in manuscript of no easy style. The actual composition of Ferdinand and Isabella began in 1829, after eight years of prelimi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
e nor newspaper, these weeklies were something of each. From the former they doubtless took away a good many readers; to the latter they were an incentive to the maintaining of literary departments which in a few papers, like the Tribune, became important. Newspapers in foreign languages, especially the German, multiplied rapidly about the middle of the century. Some of the ablest journalists of the middle of the century, not only of papers in the German language but also of papers in English, were liberal-minded Germans who sought in America the freedom of speech which was denied them in their native country. The telegraph, in 1844 shown to be practical, and put to successful use during the Mexican War, led to numerous far-reaching results in journalism. Telegraphic columns became a leading feature; news associations grew as the wires lengthened; but the greatest effect on the journalism of the country at large was to decentralize the press by rendering the inland papers, i
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 2: poets of the Civil War I (search)
ne or Thaddeus Oliver), a widely popular piece expressing sympathy with the minor and unnoted victims of the conflict. Also popular was the anonymous Tardy George, that is, General McClellan, of whom the North demanded more activity than he ever attained. In the same cause, though without the mention of names, was Wanted—A Man, by Stedman, who shortly after had to write another elegy, Kearny at seven pines, upon the gallant officer commemorated by Boker in the Dirge for a soldier. Thomas Dunn English's The charge by the Ford and Melville's Malvern Hill deal with the later events of McClellan's first campaign. Lincoln's call for new troops gave rise to the sentimental but immensely effective Three hundred thousand more by James Sloan Gibbons and to Bret Harte's The Reveille (sometimes called The Drum), which is said to have played a large part in holding California loyal. The advance of Lee to Antietam, his repulse there, and his retreat found a record in Whittier's Barbara Friet
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
le songs and to hope for that repose which ought to fill the artist's firmament while he is creating. The four remaining years of his life were spent in an unavailing search for that repose. He endeavoured to make sure where next week's dinners were coming from before carrying out his ambitions for creative work. He continued his connection with the Peabody Orchestra, but his chief endeavour turned him aside, this time into the field of scholarship. He wandered about in Old and Middle English, and ranged far in the Elizabethan period. These enthusiastic studies resulted in lectures at the Peabody Institute, and in 1879 in his appointment as lecturer in Johns Hopkins University. The science of English verse and The English novel are the products of those two years, besides some books for boys and many poems. But consumption had made such advances that it was feared that he would not live to complete his last series of lectures. Indeed, those who listened to him momentarily fea
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
worth studying as marking a stage in the development of primitive English. The life of Joel Chandler Harris was comparatively uneventful may be added, are better than the poems that he wrote in standard English. Indeed, Dunbar's command of correct English was always somewhat m. The effort now making in England, through the Society for Pure English, to restore the old words and racy idioms that survive in the Cornd Northumbrian dialects and thus to enrich and revitalize standard English, could hardly find imitation in this country, because there are nof the negro dialects and those that are more French or German than English, American dialects fall into three groups, those of New England, ts. The charge is made that it is merely an importation of cockney English. The critics, however, when pressed for proof, have been able to h to remark, And my language is plain. This is undoubtedly cockney English, but it is American as well, though it has always been and still i
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
Elsket, and other stories, 388 Elson, Louis C., 353 Emancipator, the, 188 Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 2, 3, 4, 5, 9, 11, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, 50, 112, 165, 166, 173, 197, 209, 211, 213, 226, 228, 231, 241, 245, 249, 257, 260, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 276, 283, 344, 349, 372 Emerson, Rev., William, 162 Emmett, Dan D., 291 Emory College, 153 Endicott and the red Cross, 21, 23, 26 Enfans d'adam, 268, 273 England's Neutrality, 305 English, James, 126 English, Thomas Dunn, 60, 281 English novel, the, 338, 340 Enquirer (N. Y.), 186 Enquirer (Richmond), 184 Epictetus, 264 Erskine, Lord, 97 Esprit des lois, 126 Equity jurisprudence, 77 Essa on the Muel, 157 Essay on Apple Pie, 215 Essay on Hampden, 209 Estray, the, 35 Eternal goodness, the, 52 Ethiopia Saluting the Colors, 284 Ethnogenesis, 294 Etude de l'histoire, 127 Eulogy of Sumner, 319, 320 Eureka, 60 Evangeline, 37, 38 Evening Bulletin (Phil.), 337