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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 27, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. Ericsson or search for J. Ericsson in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 3 document sections:

Doc. 23.-launch of Ericsson's battery. New-York, Jan. 31, 1862. The Ericsson Floating Battery, for the United States Government, was yesterday safely launco dip her bows into the sea, or to strain herself, than in any other case. Capt. Ericsson, however, showed his confidence in the structure which he had builded, and ightest intention of sinking, being more than three feet out of water; and Captain Ericsson was delighted to find that she drew considerably less than his calculationy-one inches above the water line. According to the original estimate of Capt. Ericsson the vessel was expected to draw ten feet, and project above the water-line t will be eight or nine inches thick on every side, but in addition to this Capt. Ericsson will place on the side in which the two port-holes are bored, which will ofct in the vicinity like an earthquake. The Government has also ordered for Capt. Ericsson some wrought-iron shot, very handsomely turned. The engines have been pl
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 82.-fight in Hampton roads, Va., March 8th and 9th, 1862. (search)
was relieved by Greene, when I managed the turret myself, Master Stodden having been one of the two stunned men. Captain Ericsson, I congratulate you upon your great success. Thousands have this day blessed you. I have heard whole crews cheer yoit all her own way with our most powerful vessels. I am, with much esteem, very truly yours, Alban C. Stimers. Captain J. Ericsson, No. 95 Franklin Street, New-York. Official reports to the rebel Congress, sent in March 13, 1862. Presessels the Government might send there. Saturday was a terribly dismal night at Fortress Monroe. About nine o'clock, Ericsson's battery, the Monitor, arrived at the Roads, and upon her performance was felt that the safety of their position in a gnning the blockade at the mouth of James River, and taking part with the Merrimac. The Federal frigate St. Lawrence and Ericsson iron propeller came up from Old Point and engaged the Merrimac. A terrific battle ensued until two P. M. The Ericsson
ever should be less than from the St. Lawrence to the Gulf, and from the Atlantic to the Pacific. In the name of this vast assembly, once more he gave thanks to them all. Let us rejoice that these men went down fighting to the last, and that when they went down they left the Star-Spangled Banner of the Cumberland flying at her peak; the emblem that no dangers, no perils, no enemies, no treasons, not ocean itself could destroy our liberty. [Loud applause.] Three cheers were given for Capt. Ericsson, for Lieut. Worden, and for the President. Mr Kearney of the Congress then sang a humorous song in praise of the yacht America, the curiosity and astonishment of John Bull being represented by the chorus: Oh! where did she come from? New-York Town. Who's the Captain of her? One Mr. Brown: which the crew sang with great gusto. The satisfaction of the audience found huge and prolonged manifestation, and the jolly tar was called back. He sang the first verse of Uncle Sam is rich e