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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Kossuth (1851). (search)
f he begs it by words not truthful from the lips of Louis Kossuth. Happy art thou, free nation of America, that thou hast founded thy house upon the only solid basis of a nation's liberty! Thou hast no tyrants among thee to throw the apple of Eros into thy Union! Thou hast no tyrants to raise the fury of hatred in thy national family! This he says, when he knows that the newspapers of one half the Union are full of the records of the atrocities perpetrated by the white man upon the blacksviction, that we have the wolf by the ears; we can neither hold him nor safely let him go, --yet this man, whose tempest-tossed life has somewhat sharpened the eyes of his soul, can see only a solid basis of Liberty No tyrant to throw the apple of Eros in the Union; to raise the fury of hatred in thy national family What place has such fulsome and baseless eulogy on the lips of a truthful and honest man? I have a great deal more of the same tenor, but I shall weary your patience. You will no
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, chapter 21 (search)
ucts of the war. For the rest of her poems, they are rarely quite enough concentrated; they reach our ears attractively, but not with positive mastery. Of the war songs, the one entitled Our orders was perhaps the finest,--that which begins,--Weave no more silks, ye Lyons looms, To deck our girls for gay delights! The crimson flower of battle blooms, And solemn marches fill the night. Hamlet at the Boston is a strong and noble poem, as is The last Bird, which has a flavor of Bryant about it. Eros has Warning and Eros Departs are two of the profoundest; and so is the following, which I have always thought her most original and powerful poem after the Battle hymn, in so far that I ventured to supply a feebler supplement to it on a late birthday. It is to be remembered that in the game of Rouge et Noir the announcement by the dealer, Rouge gagne, implies that the red wins, while the phrase Donner de la couleur means simply to follow suit and accept what comes. Rouge Gagne The wheel
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 4 (search)
assages of romantic sacrifice and of ecstatic fusion, which I have heard with the ear, but could not trust my profane pen to report There were, also, the ebbs and recoils from the other party,—the mortal unequal to converse with an immortal,—ingratitude, which was more truly incapacity, the collapse of overstrained affections and powers. At all events, it is clear that Margaret, later, grew more strict, and values herself with her friends on having the tie now redeemed from all search after Eros. So much, however, of intellectual aim and activity mixed with her alliances, as to breathe a certain dignity and myrrh through them all. She and her friends are fellowstu-dents with noblest moral aims. She is there for help and for counsel. Be to the best thou knowest ever true! is her language to one. And that was the effect of her presence. Whoever conversed with her felt challenged by the strongest personal influence to a bold and generous life. To one she wrote,— Could a word <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual Reunion of the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
the challenger. And now the Southern bands are marshalling to accept the gage of battle. The oft and vainly repeated questions—where is the arbiter? and where the court of competent jurisdiction to adjust the federal relations of the States?—receive their final answer. Sabre, cannon and rifle are the arbiters, and the field of battle the court of last resort. War, that terrible litigation of nations, rules the hour and the counsels of men, and for four fateful years of wounds and death, Eros is dethroned and Mars triumphant. Pass in review the marshaled legions of history, about whose banners song and story have enwreathed their richest garlands, and as they move by in stately procession, name the scenes of desperate battles, mark the instances of heroic courage and endurance even when hope had hid its face and turned its back, point examples of suffering borne with God-like patience and fortitude, single out individual acts of knightly heroism and devotion, and for them all y