hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 38 results in 18 document sections:

1 2
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
Aberbrothwick January 13, 1446. His third son, by his wife Lady Mariota Dunbar, was V.--Sir Walter Lindsay, of Beufort and Panbride, who married secondly Isabel, daughter of William, Lord Livingston, and by her had a son, VI.--Sir David Lindsay, of Edzell and Beufort, who died 1527, and had by his wife Catherine, daughter of Fotheringham, of Powrie, a son, VII.--Walter Lindsay, who fell at the battle of Flodden, 9th of September, 1513. He married a daughter of the noble family of Erskine, of Dun, a descendant of Sir Robert de Keith, Great Marischal of Scotland, who had command of the horse at Bannockburn. Walter Lindsay's second son, VIII.--Alexander Lindsay, married a daughter of Barclay, of Mathers. Their son, IX.--David Lindsay, was Bishop of Ross in 1600. His daughter, X.--Rachel Lindsay, married John Spottiswoode, who was born 1565. Douglas thus speaks of him: He became one of the greatest men of the kingdom for knowledge, learning, virtue and merit. He h
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
e of the first Stuart, in defence of the people. This is Selden, on every book of whose library you saw written the motto of which he lived worthy, Before everything, Liberty! That is Mansfield, silver. tongued, who proclaimed, Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free. This is Romilly, who spent life trying to make law synonymous with justice, and succeeded in making life and property safer in every city of the empire. And that is Erskine, whose eloquence, spite of Lord Eldon and George III., made it safe to speak and to print. Then New England shouts, This is Choate, who made it safe to murder; and of whose health thieves asked before hey began to steal. Boston had a lawyer once, worthy to stand in that Pantheon; one whose untiring energy held up the right arm of Horace Mann, and made this age and all coming ones his debtors; one whose clarion voice and life of consistent example waked the faltering pulpit to its duty
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
in the streets of London, would not have tried a man who could not stand on his feet. There is no such record in the blackest roll of tyranny. If Jeffries could speak, he would thank God that at last his name might be taken down from the gibbet of History, since the Virginia bench has made his worst act white, set against the blackness of this modern infamy. [Applause.] And yet the New York press daily prints the accounts of the trial. Trial! In the names of Holt and Somers, of Hale and Erskine, of Parsons, Marshall, and Jay, I protest against the name. Trial for life, in Anglo-Saxon dialect, has a proud, historic meaning. It includes indictment by impartial peers; a copy of such indictment and a list of witnesses furnished the prisoner, with ample time to scrutinize both; liberty to choose, and time to get counsel; a sound body and a sound mind to arrange one's defence; I need not add, a judge and jury impartial as the lot of humanity will admit; honored bulwarks and safeguards
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 16: Webster (search)
agne's tomb, when his imperial successor started back before the enthroned figure of the great emperor looking out upon him, instinct with life under the red glare of the torches. Let us apply another and surer test. How many speeches to a jury in a criminal trial possessing neither political nor public interest survive in fresh remembrance seventy years after their delivery? One can hardly think of jury speeches of any kind which stand this ordeal except, in a limited way, some few of Erskine's, and those all have the advantages of historical significance, dealing as they do with constitutional and political questions of great moment. But there is one of Webster's speeches to a jury which lives to-day, and no more crucial test could be applied than the accomplishment of such a feat. The White murder case was simply a criminal trial, without a vestige of historical, political, or general public interest. Yet Webster's speech for the prosecution has been read and recited until
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
18, 20, 21, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, 50, 112, 165, 166, 173, 197, 209, 211, 213, 226, 228, 231, 241, 245, 249, 257, 260, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 276, 283, 344, 349, 372 Emerson, Rev., William, 162 Emmett, Dan D., 291 Emory College, 153 Endicott and the red Cross, 21, 23, 26 Enfans d'adam, 268, 273 England's Neutrality, 305 English, James, 126 English, Thomas Dunn, 60, 281 English novel, the, 338, 340 Enquirer (N. Y.), 186 Enquirer (Richmond), 184 Epictetus, 264 Erskine, Lord, 97 Esprit des lois, 126 Equity jurisprudence, 77 Essa on the Muel, 157 Essay on Apple Pie, 215 Essay on Hampden, 209 Estray, the, 35 Eternal goodness, the, 52 Ethiopia Saluting the Colors, 284 Ethnogenesis, 294 Etude de l'histoire, 127 Eulogy of Sumner, 319, 320 Eureka, 60 Evangeline, 37, 38 Evening Bulletin (Phil.), 337 Evening Mirror (N. Y.), 59 Evening post (N. Y.), 184, 185 Evening post (Phil.), 177 Everett, Alexander H., 164 Everett,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ill, doubtless, be pleased to hear about Lord Abinger. I have written you that I have met him in society, and was not particularly pleased with him: he was cold and indifferent, and did not take to me, evidently; and so I did not take to him. Neither did I hear him, during a long evening, say any thing that was particularly remarkable; but all the bar bear testimony to his transcendency as an advocate. Indeed, James Smith—the famous author of Rejected Addresses—told me, last evening, that Erskine was the most eloquent man he remembered at the bar, but Scarlett Lord Abinger. by far the most successful advocate. You will perceive that this stretches over more than a quarter of a century. Abinger is said to be rich, and to love money very much. How is he as a judge now? Deplorable! I hear but one opinion; and recently I was with a party of lawyers who compose the Oxford Circuit, on which Lord Abinger is at this moment, and of which my friend Talfourd is the leader, when they al
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
brother William! he is always in some scrape; while the Duke of Clarence, sitting on the other side of the house, whispered to his friend, My brother Frederick is always saying some d——d absurd thing,—each supposing the other referred to by Denman! After dinner the conversation turned upon politics, and upon Canadian affairs in particular. His Lordship seemed to exult over Lord Durham, and to think that he had him on the hip. He praised Roebuck as a person of great talent; and spoke of Erskine as a very great man. When I asked who at the bar now was most like him, he said: Nobody: there is a degenerate race now; there are no good speakers at the bar, except Sir William Follett and Mr. Pemberton. He spoke of Lord Langdale as a person who had never done any thing, and who never would do any thing, and who was an ordinary man. He said that Mr. and Mrs. Austin, John Austin, 1797-1860; author of The Province of Jurisprudence Determined; and Mrs. Sarah Austin of the Taylor family o<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
nge, and if his guest had anything to say, he was sure to have an opportunity. Miss Edgeworth wrote, in 1835, After a visit made by Mr. and Mrs. Ticknor at Edgeworthtown. to a friend of Mr. Ticknor, thus:— I have been acquainted, and I may say intimately, with some of the most distinguished literary persons in Great Britain, France, and Switzerland, and have seen and heard all those distinguished for conversational talents; Talleyrand, Dumont, Mackintosh, Romilly, Dugald Stewart, Erskine, Sir Walter Scott, Sydney Smith, and Mr. Sharpe, the fashionable dinner-lions of London. I have passed days in the country-houses and in the domestic intimacy of some of them, and after all, I can, with strict truth, assure you, that Mr. Ticknor's conversation appeared to me fully on an equality with the most admired, in happy, apposite readiness of recollection and application of knowledge, in stores of anecdote, and in ease in producing them, and in depth of reflection not inferior to th
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 2: (search)
tic intercourse between Russia and the United States, showed me a letter of the Emperor to him. It was dated July 7, 1803, consisted of three sheets, and was very kind and affectionate. Laharpe had sent him, just before, one of Jefferson's messages to Congress, which had been furnished him by Joel Barlow at Paris. To this the Emperor replied:— I should be extremely happy—I believe I remember the words, and that my translation is literal—if you could put me in more direct relations with Erskine and Jefferson. I should feel myself greatly honored by it. This Laharpe showed to Barlow, and thereupon Jefferson wrote to the Emperor. A correspondence followed, and finally diplomatic relations. Why are none of the letters given in the published works of Jefferson? Such talk of the old gentleman made my evening interesting, and I parted from him, after eleven o'clock, with a good deal of regret. He is a truly venerable person, upon whom old age sits with a gracefulness that is v<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address of J. C. C. Black, at the unveiling of the Hill statue, Atlanta, Georgia, May 1, 1886. (search)
stration of self-government? Who has taught us that human virtue can set proper limits to human ambition? Who has taught the ruled of the world that man may be entrusted with power? Who has taught the rulers of the world when and how to surrender power? Of whom did Bancroft write, but for him the country would not have achieved its independence, but for him it could not have formed its Union, and now, but for him it could not set the Federal Government in successful motion? Of whom did Erskine say, you are the only being for whom I have an awful reverence? Of whom did Charles James Fox say in the House of Commons, illustrious man, before whom all borrowed greatness sinks into insignificance? Washington. What State first made the call for the convention that framed the Constitution? Virginia. Who was the father of the Constitution? Madison. Who made our system of jurisprudence, unsurpassed by the civil law of Rome and the common law of England? Marshall. Who was Marshall's
1 2