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The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: January 4, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Erskine or search for Erskine in all documents.

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Alexander Carlyle. In the last number of Blackwood's Magazine, is a review of the Memoirs of Alexander Carlyle, of Inverses, which, we take it, have just been published — at least we never heard of them before. They embrace a period of forty years and more, and are written in a delightful style, to judge from the specimens presented by the reviewer. Carlyle was a minister of the Kirk of Scotland, at a time when Robertson, Erskine, John Home and Hugh Blair were preaching, and he was intimate with all of them, as well as with David Hume, and others of that period, who have become famous. He was born at Preston Pans, and was twenty-three years old when Gen. Cope was defeated there, by the High landers, under Charles Edward, the young chevalier, or Pretender, as he was sometimes styled, although his father was more properly so styled at that time. He saw the Highland host, and gives a lively description of them and their leaders. His account of Charles Edward himself detracts s