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The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 19, 1865., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 4 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 3 1 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 23. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1865., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Erskine or search for Erskine in all documents.

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ts to make him show off. In one case, a brother had been confined by his brother as a lunatic. He appealed to the Lord Chancellor, and was brought up before him. Erskine was employed by the brother of the madman, and exhausted his ingenuity in cross-examination without being able to make anything of the case. The Chancellor was on the point of setting the lunatic free, when the physician who had attended him came into court, and whispered to Erskine that he (the madman) believed himself to be the Saviour of mankind ! Upon this, Erskine immediately altered his demeanor, apologised to the madman, and humbly begged his forgiveness, pleading, in apology, his eErskine immediately altered his demeanor, apologised to the madman, and humbly begged his forgiveness, pleading, in apology, his entire ignorance of what an exalted personage he had been dealing with. The poor innate, thrown entirely off his guard raised himself up, extended his hands in the stride of one addressing a multitude, and said, in deep and solemn tones, "I am the resurrection and the life." Of course the secret was out — the man was remanded — and