hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for B. F. Eschelman or search for B. F. Eschelman in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
d with judgment and energy. Hagood and Johnson were thrown forward by him with a section of Eschelman's Washington Artillery, and found a heavy force of the enemy, with six or eight pieces of artie history of the Washington Artillery. By Colonel J. B. Walton, Captain J. A. Chalaron, Colonel B. F. Eschelman, and Colonel W. M. Owen. [At the reunion of the famous old Washington Artillery in Nhing. We give now those of Colonel Walton and Captain Chalaron, and will give in our next Colonel Eschelman's and Colonel Owen's.] Address of Colonel J. B. Walton. Mr. Chairman,—In rising to rom his labors and his works do follow him. The Washington Artillery. Address of Colonel B. F. Eschelman at their Reunion. In response to the toast, Our Veteran Association, to which ColoneColonel Eschelman responded, he said: Comrades and Friends,—Twenty-one years ago, the body of men which has now dwindled down to what you now know as the Veteran Association, left this city to gather de
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. (search)
Sketches of the history of the Washington Artillery. By Colonel J. B. Walton, Captain J. A. Chalaron, Colonel B. F. Eschelman, and Colonel W. M. Owen. [At the reunion of the famous old Washington Artillery in New Orleans, on the 27th of May last, among other admirable speeches were several which gave valuable sketches of this grand old corps, which are well worthy of preservation in our records, and which we take pleasure in publishing. We give now those of Colonel Walton and Captain Chalaron, and will give in our next Colonel Eschelman's and Colonel Owen's.] Address of Colonel J. B. Walton. Mr. Chairman,—In rising to respond to the toast The Washington Artillery, I should not fail to give expression of my high appreciation of the compliment which is conveyed by my selection, nor of the apprehension I feel that, in consequence of a somewhat protracted indisposition, which has prohibited anything like application, I may be found unequal to the grateful duty which has been
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
The Washington Artillery. Address of Colonel B. F. Eschelman at their Reunion. In response to the toast, Our Veteran Association, to which Colonel Eschelman responded, he said: Comrades and Friends,—Twenty-one years ago, the body of men which has now dwindled down to what you now know as the Veteran Association, left this city to gather dear experience in the tented field. We had admired ourselves and each other in our gay uniforms, had felt our jackets swell with military ardor, haColonel Eschelman responded, he said: Comrades and Friends,—Twenty-one years ago, the body of men which has now dwindled down to what you now know as the Veteran Association, left this city to gather dear experience in the tented field. We had admired ourselves and each other in our gay uniforms, had felt our jackets swell with military ardor, had played at mimic war—delightful sensations, the heritage of all soldiers in peace. What a pity they do not wear better when the mimicry stops and the reality begins! They did not go far with us. Take it altogether, we did not find war nearly as interesting as parades before our sweethearts and wives, or even as such occasions as this. I cannot attempt to tell you what we did find, but I hope we may be permitted to spend the balance of our time on the peace establishment. We thought we we<