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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Essex or search for Essex in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
The birth of the ironclads The river ironclad Essex : one of James B. Eads' Mississippi monsters, converted by him from a snag-boat, and completed in January, 1862 The type favored by Ericsson: the single turreted U. S. Monitor Saugus This splendid picture of the vessel lying at anchor in the James, off Bermuda Hundred, shows clearly the details of the type of perfected monitor most favored by Ericsson. Only a few months after the duel of the Monitor and the Merrimac in Hampton Roads, no less than thirty-five ironclads of the monitor type were being constructed for the Federal navy. The old Continental Iron Works in New York, that had built the original monitor, were busy turning out six vessels of the Passaic class, while others were being rushed up by shipbuilders in the East, and on the Ohio and the Mississippi. Ericsson was already at work upon the huge Dictator and Puritan, each nearly five times as large as the first monitor. These were destined not to be
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most daring feat — passing the forts at New Orleans (search)
up and knocked the nine-inch guns about like twenty-four pounders, to the astonishment of everybody. There was but one man who showed fear and he was allowed to resign. This was the most desperate battle I ever fought since the days of the old Essex. It was the anxious night of my life, wrote Farragut later. The spar-deck shown below recalls another speech. Don't flinch from that fire, boys! There is a hotter fire for those who don't do their duty! So shouted Farragut with his ship fas the fleet Admiral David Dixon Porter was born in 1813 and died in 1891. The red blood of the sea-fighter had come down to him unto the third generation. He was the younger son of Commodore David Porter, who won fame in the Constellation and Essex. His grandfather had served with distinction in the nondescript navy of the Colonies in the war for independence. Yet with such a lineage of the free and open sea, Porter, like Farragut, proved that he could adapt himself to the cramped arenas
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
, on February 6th, where Flag-Officer Foote's flotilla consisted of the Cincinnati (flagship), Carondelet, St. Louis, and Essex, to which formidable force were added the three small wooden gunboats, Lexington, Tyler, and Conestoga. This was a jointested by Grant's army, was vigorously attacked by the same flotilla, with the exception of the Lexington, Cincinnati, and Essex, the latter having been put out of action in the attack on Fort Henry by a shot through her boilers. The fleet, however,obstacles to be overcome as enough to appall the stoutest heart. second attempt was made to destroy the Arkansas by the Essex and the Queen of the West. It was unsuccessful. The former went down stream to join Farragut, and the latter returned tot Stevens, her new commander, was eager to put his vessel into action, she ran aground, on the 6th of August, just as the Essex hove in sight. Commander William D. Porter at once opened with his bow guns, and seeing that resistance was useless, Lie
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The sea life of 1861: life on the Federal war-ships (search)
twenty thousand dollars, and even the cabin-boys The Essex Below appear four picked men from the crew of the EssexEssex. Seated on the right in the front row is Bill young, the medal of honor man whose portrait appears above. W. L. Park, to hgut had his first training as a fighter and about the newer Essex there hung much of the spirit of the navy of former days. ny-where. From Fort Henry till the fall of Port Hudson the Essex was always in the thick of the fight. One of the Essex's med. Then Commander W. D. Porter started up-stream with the Essex. As he approached the Arkansas, a few well-directed shots away, and drifting again into the current she blew up. The Essex had accomplished the destruction of the last Confederate raMississippi River. William young, gunner's mate of the Essex Four picked men gunners' crew of the Essex received laEssex received large sums. If other vessels were in a certain radius of distance or attached to the same station, they also had a share in th