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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 40 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 30 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 28 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
HISTORY OF THE TOWN OF MEDFORD, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, FROM ITS FIRST SETTLEMENT, IN 1630, TO THE PRESENT TIME, 1855. (ed. Charles Brooks) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Essex or search for Essex in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Fourth action of the Arkansas. (search)
ommander Porter volunteered the service of the Essex to make an effort to destroy the Arkansas; an the same, and attack the lower batteries; the Essex was to push on, strike the rebel ram, deliver ind the lower fleet. This armored ram, the Essex was held to be the strongest vessel of war in herself to be so. Designed to operate with the Essex in the approaching action was one of Lieut. Cos) the large and formidable iron-clad ram, the Essex emerged from the smoke above and made directlyrkansas was exchanged for the bow guns of the Essex. As the latter struck the Arkansas, one of ht men and wounding six, half of the crew. The Essex swung alongside of the Arkansas, when the lattsed firing and drifted down the river. The Essex fired only three shots; and, but for the shortip to carreen and roll heavily. * * As did the Essex, so the Queen ran into the bank astern of us, ts of our stern battery. More nimble than the Essex, the Queen soon backed away, returning up-stre
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The end of the Arkansas. (search)
t of the enemy's fleet, consisting of the iron-clad Essex, three gunboats, and some transports, all hands were reinforced to fourteen vessels, and, headed by the Essex, was slowly advancing up the river. We had not steahalted, the fire of our guns was ineffective. The Essex continued to shell us at long range, but with no effscanty. The reports made by the commander of the Essex, W. D. Porter, were found to be so little supported of Commander Porter in relation to the part both the Essex and Cayuga took in the affair. * * It was preciselyArkansas seemed to be on fire. During this time the Essex did not advance more than one-quarter of a mile near a half off, and by the time Fairfax got up with the Essex, the Arkansas was discovered to be on fire, and he tction of the Arkansas. She was no trophy won by the Essex nor did she receive any injury at Baton Rouge from the would always speak as highly of Lieut. Stevens as if he had captured the Essex and all the rest of them.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Summary. (search)
Summary. 15th July, 1862, 7 to 8 A. M., the Arkansas disabled the Carondalet and chased two other boats down the Yazoo to the fleet; 8 to 9 A. M., ran through fleet of nearly forty armored vessels of safety to Vicksburg; caused burning of a mortar boat; 9 to 10 P. M., received fire of fleet passing from above to combine with lower fleet, and repelled attack by the ram Sumter. 22d July, repelled attacks by rams, the Essex retreating down the river, and Queen of the West retreating up the river. Before the end of July, the seige of Vicksburg had been raised by the departure of one fleet up the river, and of the other down the river. The Arkansas was master of the situation.