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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The capture of Mason and Slidell. (search)
of the seizure and release of the British steamer Trent, and the capture of Slidell and Mason, and their secretaries, George Eustis and J. E. McFarland. I have never seen, even in the official reports of Captain Wilkes and his officers, an account ers of the steamer, her clearance from Havana, with the list of passengers and crew. Should Mr. Mason, Mr. Slidell, Mr. Eustis, and Mr. McFarland be on board, you will make them prisoners, and send them on board this ship immediately, and take poairfax bowed, and said: I have instructions to effect the arrest of Messrs. Mason and Slidell, and their secretaries, Messrs. Eustis and McFarland. I have information that they are on board, and I would like to see your passenger list. For a damnrnational law; an act, indeed, of wanton piracy, which, had we the means of defense, you would not dare to attempt. Mr. Eustis, one of the secretaries, was more violent than either of the principals, and made a demonstration in the direction of s
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 7: the Trent affair. (search)
federate Government to the Courts of England and France; the other two were Messrs. Eustis and McFarland, attaches to the commissioners. The Trent was one of a linanied by his family, consisting of his wife, four children and a servant, and Mr. Eustis by his wife and servants. The Trent left Havana about 8 o'clock, a. m., onand Mr. Mason, were known to be on board, as also two other gentlemen (naming Mr. Eustis and Mr. McFarland), and that the orders were to take and carry them on board fterward Mr. Mason, repeated that his orders were to take them, together with Mr. Eustis and McFarland, and carry them on board his ship, which orders he must executempelled by the employment of actual force greater than they could resist; and Mr. Eustis and Mr. McFarland united with them in expressing a like purpose. The offic Very respectfully, Your obedient servants, John Slidell, J. M. Mason, George Eustis, J. E. Mcfarland. Captain Charles Wilkes, Commanding U. S. S. San Jacinto,
o manned and armed. Messrs. Slidell, Mason, Eustis, and McFarland were recognized, and told they and crew. Should Mr. Mason, Mr. Slidell, Mr. Eustis, and Mr. McFarland be on board, you will mak see him. Mr. Mason soon joined us, and then Mr. Eustis and Mr. McFarland, when I made known the obje to the boat, into which he got. Soon after Mr. Eustis came to the boat, accompanied by Mr. Fairfax, viz., Messrs. Slidell, Mason, McFarland, and Eustis, to the San Jacinto, where I delivered them ov whom I recognized Messrs. Mason, Slidell, and Eustis. The confusion at this time passes descriptio passengers (not including Mr. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, or McFarland) were disposed to give trouble; his orders were to take them, together with Mr. Eustis and Mr. McFarland, and carry them on board hkes. Messrs. John Slidell, James M. Mason, George Eustis, and J. E. Mcfarland. Captain Wilkes' Slidell, J. E. Mcfarland, J. M. Mason, George Eustis. Captain Wilkes, Commanding United States [16 more...]
he crowd was perfectly compact. Through the courtesy of the store-keepers, ladies had admission to their windows and verandahs. The street was never, on any occasion, more greatly crowded or more splendidly embellished by the presence of the soldiers and the fair sex. Gen. James Trudeau, whose staff was a prominent feature before the multitude — this being its first parade — was composed of Brigade Inspector, Maj. Alex. Trudeau; First Aid-de-Camp, Capt. Jas. R. Currell; Paymaster, Capt. Geo. Eustis; Quartermaster, Capt. Phil. Buchanan; Assistant Aids, Captains Conrad, Burthe, and Forstall. This legion consists principally of the Orleans battalion of Artillery, the Chasseurs-a-Pied, the Orleans Guard battalion, the Esplanade Guards, the Louisiana Cadets, the Garibaldi Rifles, and the German and other companies. Gen. Tracy's brigade, the right resting on Camp street, was composed of a squadron (two companies) of cavalry, a battalion of artillery, and two regiments of infantry;
compliance with this demand being refused, the officer said he had orders to arrest Messrs. Mason, Slidell, McFarlane and Eustis, and that he had sure information of their being passengers in the Trent. While some parley was going on upon this mattearge armed guard of marines, boarded her. The officer said he had orders to arrest Messrs. Mason, Slidell, McFarlane, and Eustis, and had sure information that they were passengers in the Trent. While some parley was going on upon this matter Mr. Sl James M. Mason and E. J. MacFarlane are citizens of the United States, and residents of Virginia. John Slidell and George Eustis are citizens of the United States, and residents of Louisiana. It was well known in Havana, when these parties embar John Sildell, in similar circumstances, was going to Paris as a pretended Minister to the Emperor of the French, and George Eustis was the chosen Secretary of Legation for that simulated mission. The fact that these persons had assumed such charac
nd place for receiving them. I avail myself of this occasion to offer to your Lordship a renewed assurance of my very high consideration. William H. Seward. Lord Lyons to Mr. Seward. Washington Dec. 27, 1861. Hor. Wm. H. Seward, &c, &c.: Sir: --I have this morning received the note which you did me the honor to address to me yesterday, in answer to Earl Russell's dispatch of the 30th November last, relative to the removal of Mr. Mason, Mr. Slidell, Mr. MacFarlane, and Mr. Eustis from the British mail packet Trent. I will, without any loss of time, forward to Her Majesty's Government a copy of the important communication which you have made to me. I will, also, without delay, do myself the honor to confer with you personally on the arrangements to be made for delivering the four gentlemen to me, in order that they may again be placed under the protection of the British flag. I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedi
nd place for receiving them. I avail myself of this occasion to offer to your Lordship a renewed assurance of my very high consideration. William H. Seward. Lord Lyons to Mr. Seward. Washington Dec. 27, 1861. Hor. Wm. H. Seward, &c, &c.: Sir: --I have this morning received the note which you did me the honor to address to me yesterday, in answer to Earl Russell's dispatch of the 30th November last, relative to the removal of Mr. Mason, Mr. Slidell, Mr. MacFarlane, and Mr. Eustis from the British mail packet Trent. I will, without any loss of time, forward to Her Majesty's Government a copy of the important communication which you have made to me. I will, also, without delay, do myself the honor to confer with you personally on the arrangements to be made for delivering the four gentlemen to me, in order that they may again be placed under the protection of the British flag. I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedi
oine, with whom M. Mercier had no communication whatever. His visit, as has been heretofore announced in the Herald, was entirely in relation to commercial affairs. It is well-known here that the rebel Secretary of Legation to France, George Eustis, Jr., has sent home a dispatch full of encouragement to the rebel leaders. He expresses gratification at the kind and favorable reception he has received in the French capital, and is by no means hopeless of patching up some kind of recognitionel leaders would gladly see Mexico made a French colony, and France enjoying the monopoly of its trade, in return for French aid and recognition at the present critical moment in the affairs of the rebel confederation. The recent dispatches of Mr. Eustis are believed to have reference to such an arrangement.--These speculations are indulged by well-wishers of the conspiracy, under the impression that England's present weakness is Louis Napoleon's opportunity to carry out his policy for the aggr