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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cabinet, President's (search)
ger Oct. 27, 1881 Walter Q. Gresham Sept.24, 1884 Hugh McCulloch Oct. 28, 1884 Daniel Manning March 6, 1886 Charles S. Fairchild April 1, 1887 William Windom March 5, 1889 Charles Foster Feb. 21, 1891 John G. Carlisle March.6, 1893 Lyman J. Gage March 5, 1897 March 5, 1901 Secretaries of War. Henry Knox Sept. 12, 1789 Timothy Pickering Jan. 2, 1795 James McHenryJan. 27, 1796 Samuel Dexter May 13, 1800 Roger Griswold Feb. 3, 1801 Henry Dearborn March 5, 1801 William Eustis March 7, 1809 John Armstrong Jan. 13, 1813 James Monroe Sept.27, 1814 William H. Crawford Aug. 1, 1815 George Graham Ad interim John C. Calhoun Oct. 8, 1817 James Barbour March 7, 1825 Peter B. Porter May 26, 1828 John H. Eaton March 9, 1829 Lewis Cass Aug. 1, 1831 Joel R. Poinsett .March 7, 1837 John Bell March 5,1841 John C. Spencer Oct. 12, 1841 James M. Porter March 8, 1843 William Wilkins Feb. 15, 1844 William L. Marcy March 6, 1845 George W. Crawford March 8, 184
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Eustis, William, 1753-1825 (search)
Eustis, William, 1753-1825 Physician; born in Cambridge, Mass., June 10, 1753; died in Boston, Feb. 6, 1825; was graduated at Harvard in 1772, and studied medicine under Dr. Joseph Warren. As a surgeon he served throughout the Revolutionary War, and was a member of the Massachusetts legislature from 1788 to 1794. He was in the governor's council two years, and was in Congress from 1800 to 1805, and from 1820 to 1823. Secretary of War from 1809 until 1812, he then resigned, for there was much fault found with his administration. In 1815 he was sent as minister to Holland, and was governor of Massachusetts in 1824, dying while in office, Feb. 6, 1825.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hayne, Robert young -1839 (search)
Massachusetts and myself the very grounds which have, from the beginning, divided the two great parties in this country, and which (call those parties by what names you will, and amalgamate them as you may) will divide them forever. The true distinction between these parties is laid down in a celebrated manifesto, issued by the convention of the Federalists of Massachusetts, assembled in Boston, in February, 1824, on the occasion of organizing a party opposition to the re-election of Governor Eustis. The gentleman will recognize this as the canonical book of political scripture ; and it instructs us that, when the American colonies redeemed themselves from British bondage, and became so many independent nations, they proposed to form a national Union (not a federal Union, sir, but a national Union). Those who were in favor of a union of the States in this form became known by the name of Federalists; those who wanted no union of the States, or disliked the proposed form of union,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts, (search)
the State Constitution. Name.Party.Term. John Hancock1780 to 1785 James Bowdoin1785 to 1787 John Hancock1787 to Oct., 1793 Samuel Adams1793 to 1794 Samuel Adams1794 to 1797 Increase Sumner1797 to June, 1799 Moses Gill1799 to 1800 Caleb StrongFederal.1800 to 1807 James SullivanDem.-Rep.1807 to Dec., 1808 Levi LincolnDem.-Rep.1808 to 1809 Christopher GoreFederal.1809 to 1810 Elbridge GerryDem.-Rep.1810 to 1812 Caleb StrongFederal.1812 to 1816 John BrooksFederal.1816 to 1823 William EustisDem.-Rep.1823 to Feb., 1825 Marcus MortonDem.-Rep.Feb. to July, 1825 Levi LincolnDemocrat.1825 to 1834 John DavisWhig.1834 to March, 1835 Samuel T. ArmstrongWhig.March, 1835. to 1836 Edward EverettWhig.1836 to 1840 Marcus MortonWhig.1840 to 1841 John DavisDemocrat.1841 to 1843 Marcus MortonWhig.1843 to 1844 George N. BriggsDemocrat.1844 to 1851 George S. BoutwellWhig.1851 to 1853 John H. CliffordDem. & F. S.1853 to 1854 Emory WashburnWhig.1854 to 1855 Henry J. GardnerRepubli
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Simpson, James Hervey 1813-1883 (search)
Simpson, James Hervey 1813-1883 Military officer; born in New Jersey, March 9, 1813; graduated at West Point in 1832, entering the artillery corps. He was aide to General Eustis in the Seminole War, and in 1838 became a lieutenant in the corps of topographical engineers. He was colonel of the 4th New Jersey Volunteers in the Pensacola campaign, and was afterwards chief engineer of the Department of Ohio. In March, 1865, he was brevetted brigadiergeneral, United States army. Having been on surveying expeditions in the West, he published a Journal of a military reconnoissance from Santa Fe to the Navajo country; A report on the Union Pacific Railroad and its branches; and Essay on Coronado's March in search of the seven cities of Cibola. He died in St. Paul, Minn., March 2, 1883.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Spoliation claims. (search)
he ships were lured into that port by a special proclamation of King Joachim Murat. These spoliations constituted the basis of claims subsequently made upon, and settled by, France and Naples. The only country in Europe into whose ports American vessels might enter with safety was Russia. The War of 1812-15 wiped out all American claims for commercial spoliations against England. Those against France, Spain, Holland, Naples, and Denmark remained to be settled. Gallatin, at Paris, and Eustis, at The Hague, were instructed to press the subject. William Pinkney, former ambassador at London, appointed in Bayard's place as minister to Russia, was also commissioned to take Naples in his way, and to ask payment for American vessels and cargoes formerly confiscated by Murat, the Napoleonic sovereign. The restored Bourbon government demurred. The demand, they said, had never been pressed upon Murat himself, and they disclaimed any responsibility for the acts of one whom they regarded
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
derable towns—in Philadelphia, Trenton, New York, New Haven, and everywhere throughout Massachusetts, in order to give expression to this opposition in a manner to be audible on the floor of Congress. At Boston, on December 3d, 1819, a meeting was held in the State-house, without distinction of party, and embracing the leaders of both sides. That meeting, in its objects, was precisely like this now assembled. A large committee was appointed to prepare resolutions. Of this committee, William Eustis, afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sulliva<
derable towns—in Philadelphia, Trenton, New York, New Haven, and everywhere throughout Massachusetts, in order to give expression to this opposition in a manner to be audible on the floor of Congress. At Boston, on December 3d, 1819, a meeting was held in the State-house, without distinction of party, and embracing the leaders of both sides. That meeting, in its objects, was precisely like this now assembled. A large committee was appointed to prepare resolutions. Of this committee, William Eustis, afterwards Governor of Massachusetts, was chairman. With him were associated John Phillips, at that time President of the Senate of Massachusetts— a name dear to every friend of the slave as the father of him to whose eloquent voice we hope to listen to-night—Timothy Bigelow, Speaker of the House of Representatives, William Gray, Henry Dearborn, Josiah Quincy, Daniel Webster, William Ward, of Medford, William Prescott, Thomas H. Perkins, Stephen White, Benjamin Pickman, William Sulliva<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 3: Apprenticeship.—1818-1825. (search)
s, much is depending—the liberties of the people! And on Monday next arise in the greatness of your might, and cease not from the most strenuous exertions till you repose in the lap of victory! In spite of this eloquence, Otis was defeated by Eustis, Wm. Eustis. the Democratic candidate, to the intense disgust of his youthful advocate, who next turned his attention to foreign politics. Under the title of A Glance at Europe, and under his old signature of A. O. B., he contributed in AprilWm. Eustis. the Democratic candidate, to the intense disgust of his youthful advocate, who next turned his attention to foreign politics. Under the title of A Glance at Europe, and under his old signature of A. O. B., he contributed in April and May three articles, remarkably N. P. Herald, April 22, May 2 and 16, 1823. well written for a boy of seventeen, on the mad project of France, backed by the Holy Alliance, in attempting to restore Ferdinand of Spain to his throne, . . . and subjugating the people into an ill-timed acquiescence. A single passage from the second article shows that even at that early age he had acquired the vigor of characterization and power of invective which were afterwards to be used against domestic ty
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 4: editorial Experiments.—1826-1828. (search)
They were doubtless Democrats (or republicans, as they were then called) who had taken offence at his criticisms on Governors Eustis Wm. Eustis, Levi Lincoln. and Lincoln for their unsatisfactory conduct of the State's case against the National GWm. Eustis, Levi Lincoln. and Lincoln for their unsatisfactory conduct of the State's case against the National Government; and more followed their example a week or two later. Neverthless, we repeat, said the editor, our happiness at the loss of such subscribers is not a whit abated. We beg no man's patronage, and shall ever erase with the same cheerfulness lost none of his admiration for Harrison Gray Otis, and none of his chagrin and vexation over the latter's defeat by Governor Eustis, four years before, felt Wm. Eustis. that the time had now come for the vindication of the great Federal leader, Wm. Eustis. that the time had now come for the vindication of the great Federal leader, and that he should be chosen to the seat vacated by Mr. Webster. He accordingly wrote a carefully studied speech advocating his nomination, which he attempted to commit to memory, and then going to the caucus he seized an early opportunity to mount
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