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ch the enemy attacked Bachelor's Creek, it was evident they were taking steps looking toward the capture of the place. Deserters stated their force to be fifteen thousand to twenty thousand. Should this be their purpose, they have no small task before them. Our gunboats can be used in both rivers, and we are very strongly fortified on all sides, perhaps with one exception. Of all our defences, Fort Totten is the most formidable. It is a heavy earthwork, situated about half a mile from Evans, midway between the Neuse and Trent Rivers. It fronts the west, where stretches out before you an extensive plain, in former days a vast cotton plantation. To the right, on the bank of the Neuse, is Fort Stephenson, while to the left, on the opposite bank of the Trent, stands Fort Gaston. A strong breast-work runs in either direction to the rivers, thus linking all their forts together. Fort Totten is in a central commanding position. While it renders all approach from the west impossib
the soldiers endeavored to put out the conflagration, but much property was destroyed. In the afternoon the wind moderated and the fire was controlled. Ruins of the unfinished courthouse at Columbia The Congaree river bridge The empty prison The Presbyterian lecture-room Hunt's house Freight depot, South Carolina railroad The catholic convent: as Columbia looked after Sherman's army passed, in 1865 Home of state surgeon-general Gibbs The Lutheran church Evans and Coggswell's printing shop Deserted main street The Methodist episcopal church, Washington street The South Carolina railroad offices: what war brought to the capital of South Carolina it was decided that Sherman should march through the Carolinas, destroying the railroads in both States as he went. A little more than a month Sherman remained in Savannah. Then he began another great march, compared with which, as Sherman himself declared, the march to the sea was as child's
the soldiers endeavored to put out the conflagration, but much property was destroyed. In the afternoon the wind moderated and the fire was controlled. Ruins of the unfinished courthouse at Columbia The Congaree river bridge The empty prison The Presbyterian lecture-room Hunt's house Freight depot, South Carolina railroad The catholic convent: as Columbia looked after Sherman's army passed, in 1865 Home of state surgeon-general Gibbs The Lutheran church Evans and Coggswell's printing shop Deserted main street The Methodist episcopal church, Washington street The South Carolina railroad offices: what war brought to the capital of South Carolina it was decided that Sherman should march through the Carolinas, destroying the railroads in both States as he went. A little more than a month Sherman remained in Savannah. Then he began another great march, compared with which, as Sherman himself declared, the march to the sea was as child's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second battle of Manassas--a reply to General Longstreet. (search)
front when I received a note from Generals Hood and Evans, asking me to ride to a part of the field where they. M. he went to the position where Generals Hood and Evans had sent for him; that the battle was then being madg to his riding to the position occupied by Hood and Evans and his determination to use artillery on the columnack was led by Hood's brigades, closely supported by Evans. These were rapidly reinforced by Anderson's divisibatteries were ordered up after his joining Hood and Evans, and in the crisis of the assault. One was soon at ustained, for when he got to where Generals Hood and Evans were, the front lines of the enemy had swept across t on Jackson. After it commenced, Generals Hood and Evans sent for General Longstreet at a convenient, high piook some time for him to get where Generals Hood and Evans were, and also some time to get these batteries up aal center and left; Hood's two brigades, followed by Evans, led the attack. R. H. Anderson's division came gal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
was reinforced by Huger's division, consisting of three brigades under Generals Mahone, Armistead and Wright. One of Huger's brigades, preceding and including Seven Pines, was commanded by General Blanchard. This brigade may have been subsequently known as Wright's brigade. Page 71. Enumerating the Confederate forces engaged at Sharpsburg, says: The command of General Longstreet at that time embraced six brigades under D. R. Jones, the two under General Hood and one unattached under General Evans. His other three brigades were temporarily detached under General R. H. Anderson. There were six brigades so detached under Anderson. His own (Anderson's) division of three brigades and the three brigades of Wilcox, Featherston and Pryor, that I commanded; these were assigned to General Anderson the afternoon he marched from near Frederick City for Harper's Ferry, and subsequently formed a portion of his division. Page 75. Crouch's division, Fourth corps, Army of the Potomac, shoul
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Monocacy-report of General John B. Gordon. (search)
e, I had the division skirmishers (under Captain Keller, of Evans' brigade) deployed, and directed one brigade (Evans'), undeEvans'), under the protection of a dense woodland about seven hundred yards in front of the enemy's left, to move by the right flank and f-General York, were ordered to form on the left of Brigadier General Evans, and Terry's brigade to move in support of the lef when, on account of the wounding of one brigade commander (Evans), to whom explicit instructions had been given as to the moigadier-General York, became engaged, and the two brigades (Evans' and York's) moved forward with much spirit, driving back tts banks This position was in turn occupied by a portion of Evans' brigade in the attack on the enemy's third line. So profuana, commanding Hays' brigade; Colonel Atkinson, commanding Evans' brigade; Colonels Funk and Dungan, commanding the remnantsan Valkenburg, both of the Sixty-first Georgia regiment, of Evans' brigade, and both meritorious officers. Colonel Lamar, a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
umber. In this General Hampton's brigade participated largely and in a brilliant manner. His report, not yet sent in, will no doubt give full particulars. After this repulse, which was not followed up, as the enemy's infantry was known to be in close supporting distance, I withdrew the command leisurely to the mountain gap west of Upperville. The enemy attacked Brigadier-General Robertson, bringing up the rear in this movement, and was handsomely repulsed; the brave and efficient Colonel Evans, of the Sixty-third North Carolina troops, was, however, severely and it was feared fatally wounded, his body falling into the hands of the enemy. Jones' and W. H. F. Lee's brigades joined the main body near the gap, and positions were taken to dispute any further advance. The day was far spent. The enemy did not attack the gap, but appeared to go into camp at Upperville. In the conflicts on the left, the enemy was roughly handled. Lieutenant-Colonel Lewis, Ninth Virginia cavalry, w
ther make 53,000. Colonel Marshall then proceeds, from official reports, to show that all these numbers were exaggerated, and that one brigade, spoken of as seven thousand strong— that of General Drayton—was not known to be in the Army of Virginia until after the seven days, and that another brigade, of which General Johnston admitted he did not know the strength, Colonel Marshall thought it safer to refer to as the unknown brigade, which, he suggests, may have been a small command under General Evans, of South Carolina, who did not join the army until after it moved from Richmond. General Holmes's report, made July 15, 1862, states that on June 29th he brought his command to the north side of the James River, and was joined by General Wise's brigade. With this addition, his force amounted to 6,000 infantry and six batteries of artillery. General Ransom's brigade had been transferred from the division of General Holmes to that of General Huger a short time before General Holmes w
ly placed some of his batteries in position, but before he could complete his dispositions to attack the force before him, it withdrew to another part of the field. He then took position on the right of Jackson, Hood's two brigades, supported by Evans, being deployed across the turnpike and at right angles to it. These troops were supported on the left by three brigades under General Wilcox, and by a like force on the right under General Kemper. D. R. Jones's division formed the extreme rightd about two hundred yards beyond the line of battle, when he was recalled to the position on the railroad where Thomas, Pender, and Archer had firmly held their ground against every attack. While the battle was raging on Jackson's left, Hood and Evans were ordered by Longstreet to advance, but before the order could be obeyed, Hood was himself attacked, and his command became at once warmly engaged. The enemy was repulsed by Hood after a severe contest, and fell back, closely followed by our
other force pressed him in front. Rodes and Gordon were immediately hurled upon the flank of the advancing columns. But Evans's brigade of Gordon's division, on the extreme left of our infantry, was forced back through the woods from behind which d falling back. Just then Battle's brigade moved forward and swept through the woods, driving the enemy before it, while Evans's brigade was rallied and cooperated. Our advance was resumed, and the enemy's attacking columns, the Sixth and Nineteene flanked and about to be cut off, commenced to fall back. At the same time Crook's corps advanced against our left, and Evans's brigade was thrown into line to meet it, but after an obstinate resistance that brigade also retired. The whole front 's and Kershaw's fronts was handsomely repulsed; a portion of the assailants had penetrated an interval which was between Evans's brigade on the extreme left and the rest of the line, when that brigade gave way, and Gordon's other brigades soon foll
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