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e made an attack upon the left flank of the enemy, who had two strong batteries in a commanding position, which it was important to capture. The Fifth South Carolina regiment led the attack, but our troops were compelled to retire for a while under the heavy fire of the batteries and musketry, and the enemy immediately retreated. Up to the time of this attack, these batteries had been bombarding all the morning Gen. Longstreet's position in his intrenchments on this side of the run. General Evans, of South Carolina, was the first to lead his brigade into action at Stone Bridge. It consisted of the Fourth South Carolina regiment and Wheat's Louisiana battalion. Sustaining them was General Cocke's brigade, consisting of the 17th, 19th, and 28th Virginia regiments, commanded respectively by Colonels Cocke, Withers, and Robert T. Preston. These brigades were the first to bear the brunt of the action, as they were exposed to a concentric fire, the object of the enemy being to turn
as not at first estimated, and it was met by Gen. Evans, with only the Fourth South Carolina regimen of Gen. Holmes, from Fredericksburg, and of Gen. Evans, from Leesburg, were in the battle; and so, n. To meet this, we had only the brigade of Gen. Evans, consisting of the Fourth South Carolina, anmore explicitly the position of our forces. Gen. Evans was on the extreme left, and above the Stoneidge, they sought to come upon our rear. To Gen. Evans, as I have said, the task of defending the b be alive than dead. I spoke of the fact to Gen. Evans, in whose military department they are at pr soldiers found among them his own brother. Gen. Evans found among them Major Tillinghast, long knoed, by planting a battery of rifled cannon. Gen. Evans met it the best he could by planting his twoere first in position after those sustaining Gen. Evans, and upon a field so swept by musketry and obehind us, until discovered, I believe, by General Evans's brigade, who opened fire upon them. T
Brigadier-Generals in the Provisional army. 1. P. T. G. Beauregard, Capt. Engs. U. S. A. 2. Braxton Bragg, La., Capt. Art. U. S. A. 3. M. L. Bonham, S. C., Congressman from S. C. 4. John B. Floyd, Va., U. S. Sec. of War. 5. Ben. McCullough, Texas, Maj. Texas Rangers. 6. Wm. H. T. Walker, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Inft. U. S. A. 7. Henry A. Wise, Va., late Gov. of Va. 8. H. R. Jackson, Ga., late Minister to Austria. 9. Barnard E. Bee, S. C., Capt. Inft. U. S. A. 10. Nathan G. Evans, S. C., Major Inft. U. S. A. 11. John B. Magruder,, Va., Major Art. U. S. A. 12. Wm. J. Hardee, Ga., Lieut.-Col. Cav. U. S. A. 13. Benj. Huger, S. C., Major Ordnance U. S. A. 14. Robert S. Garnett, Va., Major Inft. U. S. A. There have been other appointments made, but they are not yet known outside of the War Office. Gens. Fauntleroy, Winder, Cocke, Ruggles, and Holmes are in the Provisional Army of Virginia. Gens. Theophilus H. Holmes, Gwynn, and Gattin are in the Provisi
's 2d, Williams' 3d, Bacon's 7th and Cash's 8th regiments South Carolina volunteers; of Shields' and Del Kemper's batteries, and of Flood's, Radford's, Payne's, Ball's, Wickman's and Powell's companies of Virginia cavalry, under Col. Radford. Cocke's brigade held the Fords below and in vicinity of the Stone Bridge, and consisted of Wither's 18th, Lieutenant-Colonel Strange's 19th, and R. T. Preston's 28th regiments, with Latham's battery and one company of cavalry, Virginia volunteers. Evans held my left flank and protected the Stone Bridge crossing, with Sloane's 4th regiment South Carolina volunteers, Wheat's Special Battalion Louisiana volunteers, four 6-pounder guns and two companies of Virginia cavalry. Early's brigade, consisting of Kemper's 7th, Early's 24th regiment of Virginia volunteers, Hays' 7th regiment Louisiana volunteers, and three rifle pieces of Walton's battery. Lieutenant Squires' at first were held in position in the rear of, and as a support to, Ewell's
eeding from Fairfax Court House, by Centreville, to Stone Bridge, the enemy passed in front of our entire line, but a distance ranging from five to two miles. At 9 o'clock, I reached an eminence nearly opposite the two batteries mentioned above, and which commanded a full view of the country for miles around, except on the right. From this point I could trace the movements of the approaching hosts by the clouds of dust that rose high above the surrounding hills. Our left, under Brigadier-Generals Evans, Jackson, and Cocke, and Col. Bartow, with the Georgia Brigade, composed of the Seventh and Eighth regiments, had been put in-motion, and was advancing upon the enemy with a force of about 15,000, while the enemy himself was advancing upon our left with a compact column of at least 50,000. His entire force on this side of the Potomac is estimated at 75,000. These approaching columns encountered each other at 11 o'clock. Meanwhile, the two batteries in front kept up their fire u