Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Robert G. Evans or search for Robert G. Evans in all documents.

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Yeas--for the Proposition as amended — were as follows — the names in italics being those of Whigs: Messrs. Allen, Ashley, Atchison, Atherton, Bagby, Benton, Breese, Buchanan, Colquitt, Dickinson, Dix, Fairfield, Hannegan, Haywood, Henderson, Huger, Johnson, Lewis, McDuffie, Merrick, Niles, Semple. Sevier, Sturgeon, Tappan, Walker, Woodbury--27. The Nays--against the proposed Annexation — were : Messrs. Archer, Barrow, Bates, Bayard, Berrien, Choate, Clayton, Crittenden, Dayton, Evans, Foster, Francis, huntington, Jarnagin, Mangum, Miller, Morehead, Pearce, Phelps, Porter, Rives, Simmons, Upham, White, Woodbridge--25. Yeas: From Free States, 13; Slave States, 14. Nays: From Free States, 12; Slave States, 13. and the proposition being returned to the House, the amendment of the Senate was concurred in by 134 Yeas to 77 Nays — a party vote: so the Annexation of Texas was decreed, in the following terms: Resolved, by the Senate and House of Representatives of the
0. Nays — Norris and Williams, of New Hampshire; Toucey, of Connecticut; Brodhead, of Pennsylvania; Clayton, of Delaware; Stuart, Gen. Cass, the inventor of Popular Sovereignty, who was in his seat and voted just before, did not respond to the call of his name on this occasion. of Michigan; Pettit, of Indiana; Douglas and Shields, of Illinois; Dodge (A. C.) and Jones, of Iowa; Walker, of Wisconsin; Hunter and Mason, of Virginia; Pratt, of Maryland; Badger, of North Carolina; Butler and Evans, of South Carolina; Dawson, of Georgia; Fitzpatrick and C. C. Clay, of Alabama; Adams and Brown, of Mississippi; Benjamin and Slidell, of Louisiana; Morton, of Florida; Houston and Rusk, of Texas; Dixon, of Kentucky; Bell and Jones, of Tennessee; Atchison, of Missouri; Sebastian and Johnson, of Arkansas; Gwin and Weller, of California--36. So the Senate decisively voted that the people of the new Territories, formed by this act from the region shielded from Slavery by the Compromise of 1
the fresh brigades of Sherman and Keyes approaching — the latter already in musket-range — our lines gave back, but under orders from Gen. Bee. The enemy, maintaining their fire, pressed their swelling masses onward as our shattered battalions retired: the slaughter for the moment was deplorable, and has filled many a Southern home with life-long sorrow. Under this inexorable stress, the retreat continued until arrested by the energy and resolution of Gen. Bee, supported by Bartow and Evans, just in the rear of the Robinson House, and Hampton's Legion, which had been already advanced, and was in position near it. Imboden's battery, which had been handled with marked skill, but whose men were almost exhausted, and the two pieces of Walton's battery, under Lieut. Richardson, being threatened by the enemy's infantry on the left and front, were also obliged to fall back. Imboden, leaving a disabled piece on the ground, retired until he met Jackson's brigade, while Richardson jo
ed the 8th Virginia, 13th, 17th, and 18th Mississippi, forming the brigade of Gen. Evans. Gen. Evans's official report states his forces in the engagement at 1,709Gen. Evans's official report states his forces in the engagement at 1,709; which evidently does not include the 13th Miississippi, with six guns, held in reserve, and so posted as to repel aid to our side from Edwards's Ferry. Col. Baker hilled outright, and more than 500, including the wounded, taken prisoners. Gen. Evans, in his report, claims 710 prisoners, including wounded, and guesses that we s own loss at 155 only, including Col. E. R. Burt, 18th Mississippi, killed. Gen. Evans says he had no cannon in the fight — which is true; for his artillery was whesapping the foundations, if not of Rebel strength, at least of Rebel energy. Gen. Evans officially reported that he had fought and beaten 8,000 men,commanded by Gen.lish affair on the part of Stuart, who was palpably misled by the gas-conade of Evans, with regard to his meeting and beating more than four to one at Ball's Bluff.
, Charles Francis, nominated for Vice-President by the Freesoilers, 191. Adams, ex-Gove., one of South Carolina's Commissioners to Washington, 411. Adams, Green, of Kentucky, 194. Adams, John, allusion to, 33; 35; 42; letter from, to Robt. G. Evans, 51; letter to Jefferson on the Missouri Restriction, 80; becomes President in 1797, 88; his Treaty with the Indians in 1798, 102. Adams, John Quincy, his firm stand in behalf of the Georgia Indians, 103; attempts to purchase Texas, 149; ua, 176. Eppes, Mr., of Fla., at Charleston Convention, 314. Etheridge, Emerson, is threatened with cold steel and bullets, if he speaks for the Union, 484; chosen Clerk of the House, 555. Eustis, captured, with Mason and Slidell, 606. Evans, Robt. J., letter to, from John Adams, 51. Evarts, Jeremiah, on Slavery and Indians, 106. Evarts, Wm. M., of N. Y., at Chicago Con., 321. Everett, Alexander H., his instructions respecting Cuba, 268. Everett, Edward, early pro-Slaver