Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Edward Everett or search for Edward Everett in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
having followed the Ohio and the Mississippi to St. Louis, and having visited Looking-Glass Prairie, in 1842 published his American notes, in which he blows 'em up with moderation. The courteous Sir Charles Lyell (1845) was unfortunately justified in a dislike of American boasting. Meanwhile the Americans, sensitive as well as vainglorious or patriotic, on their part had not been idle, whether in the magazines or in books. Niles' weekly Register, and The North American review, with Edward Everett as editor, hurried to the defence, and Timothy Dwight, Irving, Fenimore Cooper, and Paulding were among those who, with or without finesse, parried the foreign thrusts. Robert Walsh wrote An appeal from the judgments of great Britain respecting the United States (18 9), while John Neal of Portland carried the fight into the enemy's camp by contributing to Blackwood's magazine from 1823 until 1826. After Dwight's death his Travels in New England and New York were published, four substan
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: Irving (search)
e Legation at Madrid, and this first sojourn in Spain had an important influence in shaping the direction of Irving's future literary work. In July, 1827, he brought to completion his biography of Columbus, later followed by the account of the Companions of Columbus (1831). The Columbus was published in London and in Philadelphia in 1828 and secured at once cordial and general appreciation. Southey wrote from London: This work places Irving in the front rank of modern biographers ; and Edward Everett said that through the Columbus, Irving is securing the position of founder of the American school of polite learning. Irving continued absorbed and fascinated with the examination of the Spanish chronicles. He made long sojourns in Granada, living for a great part of the time within the precincts of the Alhambra, and later he spent a year or more in Seville. He occupied himself collecting material for the completion of The Conquest of Granada, published in 1829, and for the Legends of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
phy, religion, and literature make clear, a new spirit was abroad in the land, and though Channing himself had caught much of it from other and earlier sources, it is certain that German philosophy and literature, some of it directly, much more of it indirectly, was, by the third decade of the century, becoming a chief influence in its dissemination. The impetus toward things German had come, about 1819, with the return to America from Gottingen of George Ticknor, George Bancroft, and Edward Everett, young men, all of them, of brilliant parts. The interest thus aroused was fostered by the coming to Harvard a few years later, as instructor in German, of Charles T. Follen, a political exile. From about this time, some direct knowledge of Kant, Fichte, and Schelling, of Schleiermacher, of Goethe and Schiller — of Goethe probably more than of any other German writer-gradually began to make its way into New England, while the indirect German influence was even greater, coming in part t
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
f will in God and the creature, 70 n. Essay upon projects, 93 Essay upon the Microscope, 161 Essays (Emerson), 352 Essays (Montaigne), 12 Essays Biographical and critical (Tuckerman), 244 Essays on the Constitution, 148 n. Essays to do good, 93 Eulogium on Major-General Joseph Warren, 168 Eutaw, 315, 316 Eutaw springs, 183 Evangeline, 212 Evans, Nathaniel, 122, 123, 176, 177 Evening Post, the, 261, 279 Everett, Alexander, 249 Everett, David, 236 Everett, Edward, 208, 249, 332 Exact epitome of the four Monarchies, 154 Examination into the leading principles of the Federal Constitution, an, 148 Examination of Franklin, 139 Examination of the Constitution, an, 148 Excursion, the, 213 Exercise . . . to the memory of . . .George II, an, 216 Expedition to the Rocky Mountains, 2 12 Experiencia, 22 Experiments and observations in electricity, etc., 96 F Fable for critics, 282 Faerie Queene, 11 Fall of British tyranny, t